3D printed hands for free

http://time.com/4016974/3d-printed-hands-e-nable/

See How Kids Are Getting 3D-printed Hands for Free

A global network of almost 6,000 volunteers is making it happen.

With standard prosthetic hands costing anywhere from several thousand to a hundred thousand dollars, convincing insurance companies to buy new hands and arms for growing kids every couple of months is an impossible task.

After watching a YouTube video about 3D-printed prosthetics, RIT professor Jon Schull had an idea. With one YouTube comment, he harnessed an online community of volunteers and problem-solvers to work toward one goal—providing free, 3D-printable prosthetics to kids in need.

Two years later, Schull has taken his idea and turned it into a global network of almost 6,000 volunteers. To date, the e-NABLE network has printed over 1,500 devices in 50 countries, and the network continues to grow at a rapid pace.

e-NABLE’s wrist and elbow actuated prosthetics cost only $30-$50 apiece, and require up to three days worth of printer time and assembly. Schull’s volunteers are matched with a child in need, and provide the customized, completed hand or arm at no cost to the child’s family. e-NABLE’s network is currently working on making the devices available in other countries, as well as printing the hands with different skin tones and with different materials that will make the hands look more similar to the human hand.

While e-NABLE’s volunteers are spawning new variations of hands and arms faster than he can keep up with, Schull hopes to be able to expand his model to help solve new problems. He sees heads-up displays, text-to speech translators, and even gene printing in e-NABLE’s future.

“I believe we… have proven that there are probably hundreds of thousands of digital humanitarians ready willing and able to lend a metaphorical hand for the global good,” Schull said. “And so the…goal is to figure out what iceberg this is the emerging tip of.”

time.com

by Julia Lull | Aug. 31, 2015

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3D printed stormtrooper suit

http://3dprint.com/92613/3d-printed-stormtrooper-suit/

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Entire 3D Printed Star Wars Episode VII Stormtrooper Suit Shown off at PAX Prime By Barnacules

What’s the most highly anticipated movie the year? Of course it’s Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens, the first movie in the series after Disney’s purchase of the rights to Star Wars from George Lucas in 2012. While Star Wars fans are certainly excited for the next episode, many are wondering just how well director J.J. Abrams will fare in his Star Wars debut on December 18th.

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Whether you are a Star Wars fan or not, since you’re at this site you likely are a fan of 3D printing, and what better way to enhance the excitement surrounding this upcoming film than with one of the more elaborate 3D printing projects we have seen in a while?

You may remember Jerry Berg, aka Barnacules, who is a bit of a YouTube sensation himself. Back at the end of last year, we partnered with Barnacules on a video in which he polished a handful of 3D printed bronzeFill ‘Bitcoins’ using various methods. Barnacules is now back to his old 3D printing habits, this time working with MyMiniFactory on a project which can only be described as awesome! Over the last several months, an entire Star Wars Episode VII Stormtrooper suit has been fabricated, which he has been chronicling on his YouTube channel over the last few months. After lots of printing, and some incredible design work on the part of MyMiniFactory, we are told that this suit is finally complete and will be officially unveiled at PAX Prime in Seattle this weekend by Barnacules himself.

The suit–which is the work of Lloyd Roberts, the lead designer on the project, who also happens to be one of MyMiniFactory’s most popular 3D designers–was created in pieces to specifically fit the build of Barnacules. Roberts was certainly not the only one who helped out on this mindblowingly awesome project. Another MyMiniFactory character artist named Francesco Orrù put his talents to use on the project as well, using Zbrush.

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While all the components making up the Stormtrooper suit have not been publicly released and have remained under wraps, MyMiniFactory has made two key parts of the costume available on their website for free download. The Stormtrooper helmet, designed by Roberts, with some special help from his friend Ricardo Salomao, is quite impressive and will certainly get all you Star Wars fans out there a bit more excited for the film’s December release. Additionally MyMiniFactory has made the Stormtrooper TFA blaster also available for download on their site. The weapon, which was designed by another very popular MyMiniFactory user, Kirby Downey, looks pretty spectacular if you ask me.

While we are sure that there will be plenty of quality images of the 3D printed suit over the next couple of days coming from PAX, we were able to obtain a handful of pictures so far, which you can see above as well as in the gallery below. Also we highly recommend following Barnacules’ YouTube channel where he is sure to show off the suit in its entirety very soon.

Let us know if you happened to attend PAX and bump into this Barnacules wearing this incredible piece of work. What did you think? Discuss in the 3D Printed Stormtrooper Suit forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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3dprint.com

by  | AUGUST 31, 2015

3Ducation for students?

A Series of 3D Printing Videos To Educate Students Has Hit the Classroom!

http://goo.gl/Znj9ad

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Saying that 3D printing is oftentimes a difficult concept to explain is a bit of an understatement, especially to anyone who works in or related to the field. It took months for my mother to stop asking where the paper went in the printer, and I’m still not fully convinced that she finally understands instead of having just grown tired of my attempting to explain it to her.

However 3D printing isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. It will continue to be an increasingly important part of our lives. Not only as more manufacturing industries integrate additive manufacturing processes into their businesses, 3D printing will be playing ever increasing roles in the healthcare industry, dental applications, and food service, and rapid prototyping will continue to usher in an era of better designed consumer products. It is more important than ever to begin introducing the concepts behind 3D printing to schools now so our current generation grows into the one that will usher in a new age of democratized manufacturing.

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The 3D printing information aggregator 3D Printing for Everyone — 3DP4E — has joined the growing list of companies producing educational materials aimed directly at those who are unfamiliar with 3D printing concepts and technology. Their new series of Whiteboard Animations was specifically developed after 3DP4E founder Ron Rose had recent media studies graduate Noah Waldman produce a four minute video explaining 3D printing technology and processes.

“When I was hired by 3DP4E, I really didn’t know much about 3D Printing,” explained Waldman, who was hired based on multiple white-board animation videos that he has produced and uploaded to YouTube. “But I thought it was such a neat field of technology that I began to read up about it in order to try and get a better understanding of it. Also because it was kind of my job.”

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The first video titled3Ducation 101: What is 3D Printing walks viewers through the basics of both fused deposition manufacturing — FDM — and stereolithography — SLA — 3D printing methods. Rose was so impressed with the video that Waldman produced that he hired him to create an entire series of videos idea for the classroom or just to explain what you to do your parents, friends, or partners who may not get it.

“I think what Noah is creating is just brilliant!” said Rose, the founder and CEO of 3DP4E. “Our goal is to become a resource for people looking to get into 3D Printing, and I feel that these videos are the best way to learn the basics. They are smart, informative and just so entertaining to watch.”

There are currently five videos in the 3Ducation series, including History of 3D Printing, 3D Printing by Any Other Name, What is Digital Manufacturing, and their latest, 3D Printing Materials. Presenting the information using a straightforward and easy-to-follow method like white-board animation is an ideal way to communicate the complexity of 3D printing to neophytes and students alike. All of the 3Ducation videos are available for free and if you would like to share them in your classroom with your students they are available on the 3DP4E YouTube page and their Vimeo page.

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Those who work in 3D printing-related fields sometimes run into trouble in unexpected avenues — like explaining what they do to those at home. Whether trying to tell Mom what you do all day at work or explaining to students in the classroom, there’s a new educational tool available, thanks to the team at 3D Printing for Everyone (3DP4E). With a new series of Whiteboard Animations from Noah Waldman, 3DP4E’s 3Ducation series has now expanded to five short videos explaining 3D printing technology.

3DPRINT.COM
by  | FEBRUARY 20, 2015

3D printed sculptures

A Truly Mesmerizing Video Featuring 3D Printed Sculptures Created Using the Golden Ratio

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDwal4PhZv4

Want to see more like this? Follow us on http://www.facebook.com/artFido These 3d-printed zoetrope sculptures were designed by John Edmark.
YOUTUBE.COM

3D printable records

3D printable records that work on standard turntables!!

Although the quality and design needs improvement, this development means that we might all have an excuse to bust out our (grand)parents’ dusty record players and print our own tunes! 🙂

http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/21/3d-printed-record/

3D printed record puts a new spin on digital music

If you thought downloading music from the internet had nothing new to offer, think again. One of the tech editors over at Instructables — Amanda Ghassaei — has put a new twist on the digital delivery of music by 3D printing a record. Ghassaei developed a technique that converts digital audio files into 3D printable (33 rpm) grooved plastic discs, that actually play on regular turntables. Not only that, she printed some functioning prototypes as proof of concept. The printer used was relatively high-resolution, with 600 dpi on the x/y axes, and layers just 16 microns thick, but the audio quality is still somewhat low — 11KHz, with a 5 – 6bit resolution. The important thing, however, is that it worked — highlighting even more uses for the burgeoning technology. Want to know what it sounds like? Skip the needle past the break for a lo-fi (or is it “warmer”) demo that includes Nirvana, New Order, Daft Punk and more. Want to make your own? Head to the source for the blow-by-blow instructions.
ENGADGET.COM
by James Trew | @itstrew | December 21st 2012 At 7:15am