3D printing with Easy Cheese !

http://www.cnet.com/news/3d-printing-with-easy-cheese-isnt-so-easy/

Turns out 3D printing with Easy Cheese isn’t so easy

Delve into the complicated and messy world of spray-cheese 3D printing as a maker attempts to produce gooey cheese forts and cracker toppings. No, it’s not an April Fools’ joke.

Innovations in 3D printing are coming fast and furious these days. There seems to be particular interest in food-related printers capable of making anything from pizza to pancakes. But the world has really been crying out for a spray-cheese printer, and now we have one in the form of the Easy Cheese 3D Printer.

The printer uses a special mechanism to trigger the cheese can while the print head moves around to position the cheese in the correct location. At least that’s the idea. It doesn’t always go as planned. Sometimes the trigger puller slips off, resulting in no cheese being dispensed. Sometimes the cheese bubbles up around the print head, creating a gooey mess.

There are a couple of minor moments of triumph. The printer does a decent job of squeezing a mound of cheese out onto a cracker, though it fails to cleanly disconnect the cheese stream. It also creates a passable spray-cheese fort in the form of a square with layers of cheese. Let’s face it, this innovation isn’t likely to attract NASA’s attention.

The experiment comes from the creative mind of Andrew Maxwell-Parish, manager of the Hybrid Lab at the California College of the Arts. Previously, he designed an interactive tip jar called the Wu-Tang Can and a High Five Camera for capturing high fives with strangers. Suddenly, the Easy Cheese 3D printer concept doesn’t seem so out there anymore.

cnet.com

by | April 1, 2015 11:18 AM PDT

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3Ducation for students?

A Series of 3D Printing Videos To Educate Students Has Hit the Classroom!

http://goo.gl/Znj9ad

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Saying that 3D printing is oftentimes a difficult concept to explain is a bit of an understatement, especially to anyone who works in or related to the field. It took months for my mother to stop asking where the paper went in the printer, and I’m still not fully convinced that she finally understands instead of having just grown tired of my attempting to explain it to her.

However 3D printing isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. It will continue to be an increasingly important part of our lives. Not only as more manufacturing industries integrate additive manufacturing processes into their businesses, 3D printing will be playing ever increasing roles in the healthcare industry, dental applications, and food service, and rapid prototyping will continue to usher in an era of better designed consumer products. It is more important than ever to begin introducing the concepts behind 3D printing to schools now so our current generation grows into the one that will usher in a new age of democratized manufacturing.

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The 3D printing information aggregator 3D Printing for Everyone — 3DP4E — has joined the growing list of companies producing educational materials aimed directly at those who are unfamiliar with 3D printing concepts and technology. Their new series of Whiteboard Animations was specifically developed after 3DP4E founder Ron Rose had recent media studies graduate Noah Waldman produce a four minute video explaining 3D printing technology and processes.

“When I was hired by 3DP4E, I really didn’t know much about 3D Printing,” explained Waldman, who was hired based on multiple white-board animation videos that he has produced and uploaded to YouTube. “But I thought it was such a neat field of technology that I began to read up about it in order to try and get a better understanding of it. Also because it was kind of my job.”

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The first video titled3Ducation 101: What is 3D Printing walks viewers through the basics of both fused deposition manufacturing — FDM — and stereolithography — SLA — 3D printing methods. Rose was so impressed with the video that Waldman produced that he hired him to create an entire series of videos idea for the classroom or just to explain what you to do your parents, friends, or partners who may not get it.

“I think what Noah is creating is just brilliant!” said Rose, the founder and CEO of 3DP4E. “Our goal is to become a resource for people looking to get into 3D Printing, and I feel that these videos are the best way to learn the basics. They are smart, informative and just so entertaining to watch.”

There are currently five videos in the 3Ducation series, including History of 3D Printing, 3D Printing by Any Other Name, What is Digital Manufacturing, and their latest, 3D Printing Materials. Presenting the information using a straightforward and easy-to-follow method like white-board animation is an ideal way to communicate the complexity of 3D printing to neophytes and students alike. All of the 3Ducation videos are available for free and if you would like to share them in your classroom with your students they are available on the 3DP4E YouTube page and their Vimeo page.

3ducation

Those who work in 3D printing-related fields sometimes run into trouble in unexpected avenues — like explaining what they do to those at home. Whether trying to tell Mom what you do all day at work or explaining to students in the classroom, there’s a new educational tool available, thanks to the team at 3D Printing for Everyone (3DP4E). With a new series of Whiteboard Animations from Noah Waldman, 3DP4E’s 3Ducation series has now expanded to five short videos explaining 3D printing technology.

3DPRINT.COM
by  | FEBRUARY 20, 2015

3D printing revolution in school

September is round the corner and 3D printing is ready for school!

Check out our latest blog post on the many incredible ways 3D printing is being of great assistance in the classroom!

http://malta3dprinting.blogspot.com/…/3d-printing-goes-back…

Modern universities around the world have successfully endorsed 3D printers in the classroom. Students from all walks of life are creating innovative products, rivaling the originality and ingenuity of high-end companies.

They’ve created interesting products like boats and augmented reality headsets, to name a few.

While many of these institutions at the top of the educational hierarchy are focusing on additive manufacturing, what about those lower down the learning tree?

Imagine the possibilities of having small, user-friendly 3D printers in our children’s classrooms. Computers provided a tremendous leap in learning potential, proof that accepting modern means of learning can pay dividends.

Malta 3D Printing’s Facebook page recently featured an interesting infographic regarding the myriad of different uses 3D printers would have in a classroom.

Titled ‘Revolutionizing the Classroom,’ the picture explains how printing could impact 9 different academic subjects – from biology and chemistry, to graphic design and history.

The global surge in interest in 3D printing has even lead to books being written specifically for teachers seeking to use a printer in the classroom. One of the more recent additions is titled ‘The Invent To Learn Guide to 3D Printing in the Classroom: Recipes for Success‘, by Norma Thornburg, David Thornburg and Sara Armstrong.

Available on Amazon, the step-by-step guide has received plenty of positive reviews. It presents 18 stimulating printing projects – covering a wide range of subjects including mathematics, engineering and science.

For educators less comfortable with certain technical aspects of 3D printing, this book is definitely for you.

It is crucial that we introduce these technologies at a young age, allowing for children to get accustomed to them nice and early. The usual naysayers – Luddites and technophobes – may resist such a transition, as they did when desktop computers slowly made their way into the classroom a couple of decades ago.

However, provided all goes well, 3D printers can become a bastion of educational technology!

Picture

It’s perfect for allowing children to explore their imagination, simultaneously widening their range of creative skills. Furthermore, it encourages kids to keep trying even after they’ve failed, as printing itself requires trial and error.

So often, children are frustrated by failure, yet 3D printing allows for an environment which accepts it with open arms.

It’s nice to know that messages from the printing industry aren’t falling on deaf ears. As far back as 2009, projects like KIDE have begun infiltrating classrooms in the UK. Started byDejan Mitrovic – a technological pioneer – his educational scheme focuses on bringing 3D printing into the classroom, focusing on a ‘think-create-use’ model.

This Vimeo video captures the KIDE project in action – displaying the students’ work in a 2 minute slideshow.

On the other side of the pond, an article by Redorbit tells us about 12 groups of teachers who visited the Michigan Technological Institute to learn more about 3D printing. They were effectively given a crash course, ensuring they return to their respective schools with a decent understanding.

Slowly, but surely, the world is embracing 3D printing. It’s only a matter of time before it spreads across the globe!

Perhaps one-day the children of the future will begin community altering projects in their very own classrooms. We’ll open our newspapers to read about a local group of boys and girls who helped to pioneer a contraption of the future.

All we must do is provide them with the tools and proper guidance – then sit back in awe as we watch the cogs in our little men and women’s brains turn.

MALTA3DPRINTING.BLOGSPOT.COM
by  | 26 August 2014

3D printing revolution

An infographic on some of the many ways in which 3D printing can be a HUGE asset to the classroom!

"An infographic on some of the many ways in which 3D printing can be a HUGE asset to the classroom!"