3D printed halo guns!

Lucky Winners at the UGC Received Incredibly Detailed 3D Printed Halo Guns as Prizes, Including a Sniper Rifle Measuring in at 5.3 Feet in Length!

http://goo.gl/osM4vo

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One area in which 3D printing has really excelled as of late is in the reproduction of weapons and props from popular video games. For decades, gamers have been trying to reproduce these often intricate virtual pieces in the actual physical world. The ability to turn an item within a game into a 3D model and then fabricate a near-exact replica of that item on a 3D printer has certainly taken things up a notch or two.

If you are a video game enthusiast, then it’s likely you have either played in, watched, or at least know someone who has participated in some sort of gaming tournament. Some people actually make careers out of their incredible gaming skills. One company called Ultimate Gaming Championship (UGC) caters to these types of people. Whether you want to show off your skills, or make perhaps thousands of dollars, UGC hosts tournaments and leagues in which gamers can meetup, socialize, and have a blast.

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Earlier this month, UGC hosted a tournament in St. Louis, MO where gamers came together to compete for $20,000 in prizes. Yes, I said $20,000! The occasion for such a large giveaway? November marked the 10th anniversary of the Halo 2 launch, the first-person shooter video game which was developed by Bungie Studios and released in 2004. I think it’s fair to say that those reading this article have at least heard of the game before.

The event, which drew in over 500 gamers worldwide, and took place over a three day period, from January 2-4, had an extra special component to it this time. Owner and Founder of UGC, Matt Jackson, turned to 3D printing as a way to add to the excitement and energy at the venue.

“I developed and 3D printed several weapons from the game Halo to co-align with the theme of our last event which was a Halo 2 Anniversary 4v4 $20K payout tourney,” explained Jackson to 3DPrint.com. “I thought this was an interesting way to bridge the exposure of 3D printing game props to competitive video gaming.”

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Jackson printed out a total of three weapons from the game, which included the standard M6 Hand Gun, a gold MVP Award M6 Hand Gun, and the grandaddy of them all, a Halo 4 Sniper Rifle, which measured a staggering 5.3 feet in length. The weapons were all a big hit, showing the capabilities that 3D printing has, and how those capabilities can be integrated into the gaming space, allowing for the virtual world to merge with that of the physical.

In the end, there was only one Grand Prize winning team, DenialEsports, but in actuality everyone was a winner, as they all seemed to have a blast, as 3D printing inched its way a bit closer to the mainstream. Check out some additional photographs that Matt Jackson was kind enough to share with us below, as well as a video showing the final moments of the tournament. Lets hear your thoughts on yet another amazing use for 3D printing. Discuss in the Ultimate Gaming Championship forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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3DPRINT.COM
by  | JANUARY 11, 2015

Gaming experience with 3D printing

Check Out LyteShot: An Outdoor Gaming Experience Which Allows Players to Interact With Each Other in the Real World

http://goo.gl/GXFdQE

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Video games are fun. There are no questions about it, and they will only continue to improve as time goes by. The one problem with video games, however, is the fact that more and more kids are passing up physical outdoor activities and instead spending hours on end in front of their television sets, smartphones and tablets.
Thanks to one father, named Mark Ladd, and his company, LyteShot, this may be about to change. Ladd was tired of seeing his kids stuck to their phones and tablets, and wanted to conceive of a way that he could get them out of the house and also connect with them in a fun way.
“I wanted to come up with a way to integrate the digital gaming experience, to get them to head outside and once again engage their imagination,” says Ladd.
So he and co-founder Tom Ketola came up with a new type of mobile gaming system which also happens to utilize 3D printing for the customization of peripherals, and they are currently trying to raise funding via Kickstarter. LyteShot provides for a real-world gaming experience, where gamers actually interact with one another on a physical level.
The LyteGun
Gamers are equipped with two devices, a Lyter (the weapon), and the LytePuck, which is a sensor. The sensor acts as a target of sorts, receiving a signal from the Lyter when a player is hit, and alerting the players via a light and vibration mechanism. The Lyter acts as the base for adding on peripherals to turn it into a gun, knife, sword, or virtually anything you can think of. The company is also making it so that these peripherals can be 3D printed on virtually any 3D printer. Backers of the Kickstarter campaign may choose a backer level that comes with the .STL files for 3 of these 3D printable peripherals, and developers and gamers themselves may also design and 3D print their very own.
The LyteDagger

Currently LyteShot is working on completing a game called Assassin, but they are also welcoming other developers to join in and develop more games. It should be interesting to see what comes about with LyteShot, and what types of other games are developed for it, if successfully funded on Kickstarter. Conceivably the possibilities are endless. Other than games that involve weapons, there could even be sports games, where developers create some sort of 3D printable accessory that could turn the Lyter into a hockey stick or baseball bat, or virtually anything else that they can think up.

The idea of 3D printing could make this mobile gaming application quite unique, allowing gamers to modify their weapons and fully customize them for their own unique gaming experience.

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What do you think about LyteShot? Have you backed them on Kickstarter? Discuss in the LyteShot forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3DPRINT.COM
by  | JANUARY 8, 2015

3D printed Assassin’s Creed Blade

If you’re an Assassin’s Creed fan the signature retractable blade must have fascinated you at some point.

Farell Rozan loved it so much he designed and printed this working prop based on ‘Black Flag’. Follow the link below to check out his design in more detail!

http://3dprint.com/18863/assassins-creed-blade-3d-print/

We have seen our fair share of 3D printed props based on those found within video games. In fact, there are a whole slew of cosplayers who rely on many of these props to express themselves in a type of performance art. 3D printing has taken prop making, added precision and complexity, and has allowed for much more realistic pieces to be made.

One such piece was recently created by a man named Farell Rozan, based off of one of his favorite games, Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag. The game, set in the early 18th century during the Golden Age of Piracy, and developed by Ubisoft Montreal, pits players against one another or the computer, in a fun, intriguing, stealth action-adventure.

Rozan had recently purchased a Flashforge Creator pro 3D printer and wanted to create something fun, yet a bit challenging for his first project. What better an item to choose than the Assassin’s Creed blade.

“The Assassins Creed Blade is actually my first major 3D print project. I’ve been wanting to explore printing a model that has a mechanism, with moving parts, plus utilizing dual printing,” explained Rozan to 3DPrint.com. “Since it’s my first [project], I wanted to make something simple that has a trigger and performs an action. Making a gun requires a lot of mechanical parts so that’s not an option for a beginner. I’ve been playing the Assassin’s Creed: Black Flag, and I thought the hidden blade was perfect for the job! I’ve always admired the mechanism of the blade and how stealthy it is.”

Once this decision was made, Rozan scoured the internet for the perfect model. After searching Thingiverse and Youtube for quite a while, all the models he found were quite large, needing a thick handle to enclose the mechanisms required for the retraction of the blade. Unfulfilled, Rozan decided that the only way he was going to 3D print a blade he’d be satisfied with, was to design it himself.

“Using Google Sketchup, I designed the model that utilizes a rubber band and a trigger-release in the mechanism,” explained Rozan. “With parts that hold the blade sturdily during extraction, and a few braces to hold the body frame together.”

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Being a newcomer to 3D printing, Rozan had difficulty calibrating his printer and had to reexamine several areas of his design. One of the main design flaws he had experienced, was that of not allowing for the proper amount of gap tolerance. Additionally, it was difficult for Rozan to figure out the correct amount of infill to use so that the blade, which was printed with the more tolerant ABS thermoplastic, would not bend or snap very easily. After his 4th design, and learning a great deal about modelling and printing in three dimensions, he felt he had perfected his creation. Judging by the images and videos Rozan has provided us, I think he may be right. Rozan discussed with us what he has learned from this project:

“It’s better to simplify the parts to allow some tolerance in minor print defects. Also, it’s always an option to fix some model parts during the post process rather than fixing the 3D model for accuracy. Printer calibration is key. There’s a lot of times where I thought the defects came from errors from my 3D model, but it turned out it was due to the printer calibration. The orientation of your model while printing is also key for making high strength parts.”

In total, the final blade took about 12 hours to print out on the Flashforge Creator pro. Once printed, it took Rozan an additional 4 hours for post-processing. The entire blade is made up of 42 parts, which include rubber bands and wrist straps in addition to the 3D printed pieces. Let’s hear your thoughts on Rozan’s creation, in the 3D Printed Assassin’s Creed Blade forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3DPRINT.COM
by  | OCTOBER 12, 2014