Imaginative children’s drawings and 3D printing

http://www.psfk.com/2015/07/3d-printed-drawings-childrens-drawings-toys-moyupi.html

3D Printing Brings Imaginative Children’s Drawings to Their Playrooms

3D Printing Brings Imaginative Children’s Drawings to Their Playrooms

Now kids can bring their made-up monsters to life with MOYUPI.

Did you ever make up some fantastical creatures as a kid that you wished existed as actual toys? Maybe you tried to put your parents to work helping you mold them out of clay? MOYUPI promises to make kids’ creatures even more real through the magic of 3D printing and a little hand-painting.

moyupi4.png

The company uses digital modeling software to prepare your creature (or MOYUPI) for 3D printing, and then renders them in kid-friendly, durable ABS plastic. Due to the rudimentary nature of color 3D printing and the creators’ desire to precisely follow directions, color is carefully added to the designs by hand. MOYUPI can be rendered in three different sizes (15cm, 10cm and 7cm) and two types of boxes designed by Brazilian artist and illustrator Mayra Magalhães, and can also be shipped without paint so kids can do it themselves.

moyupi2.jpg

The limitations of 3D printing that the creators have encountered also happen to sync up fairly well with many children’s drawings; for example, irregular shapes are considered ideal for making a MOYUPI, but stick figures and other designs below a minimum thickness can’t be accepted. The MOYUPI project also encourages children to be original, as the creators can’t print licensed characters like Spongebob or Elsa (but they can print designs inspired by them).

“A team composed by artists… is the opportunity to get creative in the design process,” said MOYUPI founder Juan Ángel Medina in an email. “‘How did the kid imagine his Moyupi?’, ‘is that an arm or a horn?’, ‘is this element part of the shape or just something drawn on it?’. These questions aren’t always easy to answer, so we need to put our minds in a kid-like state to imagine what the kids wanted to portray and design it in the most accurate way.”

moyupi5.jpg

So what’s the big-picture mission with MOYUPI? The young team of six designers says they are interested in donating a portion of the company’s proceeds to organizations: “ASPACE, ALES, PÍDEME LA LUNA and ASPERGER, each one linked to one of MOYUPI mascots.”

moyupi1.jpg

An early-bird special allows backers who pledge $34 or more to receive a small MOYUPI figure as well as a Maxi Pack; a special XXL size (30 cm high) for $114 will also only be available during the special Kickstarter campaign. A variety of other configurations, some geared toward multiple kids and families, should be a great opportunity for kids and adults alike to unleash their creativity.

“The material I would like to use for the Moyupi is a rubber-like one, in order to make them even more friendly and resistant. That’s a possibility we are currently researching,”  said Medina. Stretch goals also include a video game, YouTube series and research into making posable, articulated figures: all promising ideas for a kids’ brand.

psfk.com

by RACHEL PINCUS | 17 JULY 2015

 

3D printed movie and video game prop

http://gizmodo.com/i-stumbled-upon-a-3d-printed-movie-and-video-game-prop-1698250876

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

I Stumbled Upon a 3D Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Here at the Inside 3D Printing show in New York City, I stumbled upon a treasure trove of 3D-printed movie props, printed on standard consumer printers, and I never wanted to leave.

The creations come from My Mini Workshop in London, an intensive 10-week program for learning 3D printing, which just kicked off for the first time ever in NYC. I was annoying and bugged some innocent passersby to snap pictures and nabbed a few pictures of my own. These. Things. Are. Awesome.

Starlord Mask, The Guardians of the Galaxy

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Mjölnir, Thor and Avengers

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Type-25 Carbine (Spike Rifle), Halo Series

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Thorn, Destiny

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Ant-Man helmet, Ant-Man

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Isaac Clarke’s helmet, Deadspace Series

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

The Samaritan, Hellboy

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Buster Sword, Final Fantasy VII and Covenant Carbine, Halo

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

NBD, just me holding one of the greatest weapons in video game history/fulfilling a childhood dream. By Luka Verigikj and Daniel Schunemann.

gizmodo.com

by Darren Orf | 4/16/15 4:07pm

Super game Pi !

3D Print Your Very Own Retro Gaming Devices with AdaFruit!

http://3dprint.com/37610/super-game-pi-3d-print/

adafruit-logo

Anyone who knows a passionate gamer, or is one, is probably well aware that this isn’t just a fascination with the games, but often also includes a penchant for checking out all hardware, tweaking and creating systems, hacking files, using retro platforms, and experimenting with a lot of DIY projects.

Gaming and 3D printing enthusiasm often go together because it is a creative world of people who like not only to make their own alternate reality sometimes, but who gain great joy from trying new things and making things work better for their gaming needs whenever possible—in terms of performance, and often—portability. Sometimes that means taking on a DIY challenge.

The gameboy is a staple. And what could be more fun than building your own?Adafruit is giving you all the tools you need, as an advanced maker, for a pretty complex, but fun, 3D printing project that you can download and modify to your heart’s desire. Dubbed the Super Game Pi, it’s easy to construe that you’ll be needing an ever-useful Raspberry Pi computer for this handheld device, which features:

  • 12 buttons
  • Analog joystick
  • Stereo speakers
  • 5” HDMI display
  • Raspberry Pi A+
  • RetroPie image

GIF buttons

If you are an experienced DIY’er and have some pretty mad ‘maker’ skills, this project, probably taking about six hours of your time (expect the parts to take at least six to eight hours to print), certainly looks like a productive way to spend your Saturday morning.  It’s certainly a challenging DIY project that will yield awesome results and fun for the rest of the weekend and beyond. One thing to keep in mind before starting is that the parts are on the larger side, so you will need either a 3D printer that has a large build envelope, or you will want to send this out for 3D printing from a third party service. Cura is recommended for slicing. Click here for information on downloading the files.

gaming_hero-collage

PLA is recommended for the 3D printing process of the enclosure which houses all the electronics. You should not require any support material. Adafruit wants you to enjoy a smooth finish on the enclosure, so they recommend using an epoxy resin for 3D printed parts calledXTC-3D Coating. It not only gives your new portable gaming device a shiny look, but also smooths out all the lines and ridges.

And how to find the buttons for your controller? You may have done something like this before, as Adafruit recommends taking an old SNES controller apart and sawing off the PCB’s into sections. For connecting the buttons to the Pi, you will want to refer to the video below to see the suggestion regarding modifying jumper cables and soldering the wires to the PCBs. Adafruit recommends using TPE flexible filament like Ninajflex for 3D printing the L and R shoulder buttons, giving them the preferred and suitable rubbery texture convenient for gaming.

The Super Game Pi features a 5″ HDMI display, and due to the flexibility afforded by the Raspberry Pi, you can use virtually any emulator running Emulationstation.

For auditory, Adafruit recommends the ST2012 2.8 watt class D amplifier, due to its compact nature, offering two channels, which are more than specific for this project. They used two small speakers which are simply mounted and snapped in place inside the 3D printed enclosure.

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Wiring and circuitry are not as challenging in this project as you may expect, since you have a clearly outlined diagram to refer to, as well as a GPIO cheat sheet. The Super Game Pi is powered by the PowerBoost 500C charging breakout, which is convenient in that it’s easy to charge with a micro USB cable. You’ll want to use a pretty large battery, with the 660 milliamp batteryrecommended, as it offers around six hours of gaming time.

You will also want todownload and burn the RetroPi image to a micro SD card. This involves connecting your Pi to your wireless network, which can be done easily with a USB connector. After that, you will need to configure and save the files so the Raspberry Pi is able to format the operating system to match the resolution of the 5″ HDMI display.

All the steps are laid out succinctly in the AdaFruit learning guide so that you have a seamless and fun way to make this 3D printed gaming device. This project has support for way more games, a bigger screen, and decent sound.

To make your own Super Game Pi, you’ll have to 3D print the enclosure, hack an SNES controller and solder electronics. With this project, you will find yourself with access to a large volume of games, nice big screen, great sound, and a comprehensive controller. Click here for the full tutorial.

Parts needed:

  • Raspberry Pi A+
  • TFP401 HDMI Driver
  • 5″ TFT Display
  • Analog 2-axis Joystick
  • Cupcade Adapter PCB
  • 6600mAh Lithium Ion Battery
  • SNES Controller
  • PowerBoost500C
  • Stereo 2.8W Class D Audio Amp
  • 2x Mini Metal Speakers
  • 40-pin FPC extension
  • USB Mini WiFi module

gaming_parts-sm

Tools and supplies required:

  • 3D Printer
  • Soldering Iron
  • Power Drill
  • Panavise Jr.
  • Helping-Third Hand
  • PLA + Ninjaflex Filament
  • Hakko Flat Pliers + Flush Diagonal Cutters
  • 30AWG silicone coated strand wire
  • Heat shrink tubing
  • HDMI Flat Cable
  • Female Jumper Wires
  • 3.5mm Stereo cable

Are you planning to 3D print the Super Game Pi? Have you 3D printed anything similar on your own? Tell us about it in the Super Game Pi forum over at 3DPB.com.

gaming_hero-hands1

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3DPRINT.COM
by  | JANUARY 15, 2015

First 3D LED printer

The first 3D LED printer may one day give you your own real-world heads-up-display, or HUD.

Researching a method that would integrate electronics with 3D geometry, the team at Princeton University may, in the future, help give your life that video-game spin 🙂

Want to see how they plan on doing it? Follow the link below!

Researchers at Princeton University have developed a 3D printer that can print LEDs in layers — and it could one day print contact lenses that incorporate heads-up displays.

Here’s a hypothetical question: would you rather have a head-up display on glasses or a contact lens?

If you answered “contact lens”, the bad news is that you may be waiting some time. But the good news is that it just got a little more feasible, with the invention of the world’s first 3D printer that can print LEDs.

The team, led by Michael McAlpine at Princeton University’s McAlpine Research Group, has successfully used its printer to 3D-print quantum dot LEDs — LEDs that are considered the next step up from OLED. QLEDs shine brighter and with purer colour, at a lower power consumption rate, using cadmium selenide nanocrystals. They’re also ultrathin, flexible and transparent — like, for instance, contact lenses.

“The conventional microelectronics industry is really good at making 2D-electronic gadgets,” McAlpine said. “With TVs and phones, the screen is flat. But what 3D printing gives you is a third dimension, and that could be used for things that people haven’t imagined yet, like 3D structures that could be used in the body.”

McAlpine and his team printed the LED in five layers. A ring made of silver nanoparticles on the bottom layer is the metal conduit for a mechanical circuit. Two polymer layers follow to supply and transfer the electrical current to the next layer, consisting of cadmium selenide nanoparticles (the quantum dots) contained in a zinc sulphide case. The top and final layer is the cathode, made of eutectic gallium indium.

“What we have presented here is an additional method to integrate electronics that can take into consideration the three-dimensional geometry of an object,” said study lead co-author Yong Lin Kong. He also noted that this is the first example of a fully 3D printed, fully functional electronic device.

Potential applications for the technology include wearables, such as the aforementioned contact lens — if the team can figure out a way to include an on-board power supply. The team is also going to be investigating the inclusion of a 3D-printed transistor for added functionality.

You can find the full study online in the journal Nano Letters.

CNET.COM
by | November 20, 2014 8:26 PM PST