Industrial revolution!

Educate Yourself About the Upcoming Revolution in the World of Manufacturing!

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THE WORLD AROUND us has advanced so much that science fiction is no more a fiction. Moving from prototyping to tooling, additive manufacturing commonly known as 3D printing has expanded to full-scale end-part production and replacement part production. Be it a 3D printed bionic ear enabling you to hear beyond human hearing frequencies, 3D printed cake toppings taking the culinary innovation to another level, 3D printing your dream house in just a few hours — 3D printing is revolutionizing every walk of life. According to Wohlers Report 2014, the worldwide revenues from 3D printing are expected to grow from $3.07 billion in 2013 to $12.8 billion by 2018, and exceed $21 billion by 2020.

No wonder one of the biggest players in printing, HP (Hewlett-Packard), entered the field with a faster, cheaper version of 3D Printer focused on Enterprise Market. So is this the first step from a “revolutionary” Maker Movement to an Industrialized Scale that technology eventually needs to survive for the long term? To a world of taking a 3D physical product or an idea to the Digital World, which happens to be 2D and then back out to 3D physical form anywhere across the globe, where an IP address and enough bandwidth is available to be able to transmit the Digital Model. This does have significant disruption potential. How much and when this will happen will of course depend on several factors across economics, technological feasibility, policies and of course politics. So are we finally ready to go beyond the growth that the DIY enthusiasts have driven from 200% to 400% in personal 3D printers between 2007 and 2011 according to a McKinsey Study.

Before we pose those questions, let’s look at what has been already achieved or near achievement across markets beyond printing prototypes, toys and models.

In the field of medicine, 3D printing of complex living tissues, commonly known as bioprinting, is opening up new avenues for regenerative medicine. With an improved understanding of this technology, researchers are even trying to catalyze the natural healing mechanism of the body by creating porous structures that aid in bone stabilization in the field of orthopedics. This cutting edge technology in conjunction with stem cell research is likely to revolutionize the made-to-order organs, cutting across the transplant waiting lists. Even intricate human body parts like the brain can be replicated using the 3D technology to aid in complex medical surgeries through simulation.

The Aerospace industry, an early adopter of this technology, is already designing small to large 3D printed parts saving time, material and costs. 3D printing also offers the biggest advantage critical to the aerospace manufacturers – weight reduction. It also accelerates the supply chain by manufacturing non-critical parts on demand to maintain JIT (Just-in-time) inventory. The power of additive manufacturing can do away with several manufacturing steps and the tooling that goes with it.

The Automobile world is already witnessing crowd-sourced, open-source 3D printed vehicles driving off of the showroom floors. Local motors caught the audience by surprise by 3D printing its car ‘Strati’ live at the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) in Chicago. So how can an auto part be a challenge by any means? Are we headed towards making that exhilarating smell of burnt rubber a thing of the past? Something future generation will ask, what the big deal about that was? How about robots with muscle tissue powered parts?

The 3D printed “bio-bot,” developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is likely to be really flexible in its movements and navigation. (So, forget about the much jibed about robotic movements.) With this breakthrough, researchers are contemplating on the possibility of designing machines enabled with sensory responding abilities to complex environmental signals.

So where does all this lead us?

The excitement growing around the 3D technology is palpable and rightly so not without a reason. 3D technology surely shifts the ownership of production to the individuals and brings to light most of the inefficiencies of mass-production. Of course, not everything can be 3D printed, but a wider use of 3D printers might reduce need for logistics as designs could be transferred digitally leading to a decentralization and customization of manufacturing. 3D scanning as an enabling technology will also help in creating an ecosystem to support users. The layer by layer manufacturing by 3D printing has the dexterity to fabricate intricate geometries efficiently and hence reduces the wastage caused by traditional manufacturing methods.

By reducing the cost and complexity of production, 3D printing will force companies to pursue alternate ways to differentiate their products. It will also help companies enhance their aftermarket services by facilitating easy on-demand manufacturing of replacement parts. As manufacturing is moving closer to the consumers, the consumer is fast transforming into a prosumer.

There are, of course, hurdles to overcome, not the least entrenched incumbency and policies, which will be governed by more short term economic and social impacts as the positive outcomes of such revolutions are often difficult to envision.

McKinsey has estimated a potential of generating an economic impact of $230 billion to $550 billion per year by 2025 with various 3D applications, the largest impact being expected from consumer uses, followed by direct manufacturing. As the breadth of application of 3D printing continues to grow, it will be interesting to observe how the industries will mix with and influence the future of additive manufacturing.

Almost every sector of the industry is riding on the 3D opportunity bringing innovations to reality and the world is ready to hop on to a decentralized industrial revolution. Are you?

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3D printing used in Opel cars

Take a look at how Opel are using 3D printing to make life at their assembly plants cheaper yet better!

http://www.engineering.com/…/Tools-from-3D-Printer-Make-Car…

opel, jigs, fixture, automotive

For some, it may still seem like a long way off, but it’s already part of everyday life at Opel: assembly tools produced by a 3D printer are an increasingly important part of the production process. A six-strong team led by Virtual Simulation Engineer Sascha Holl prints plastic assembly tools in Rüsselsheim which are used in Opel manufacturing plants across Europe. Cheaper and quicker to produce, these tools are being used at Eisenach for the assembly of the ADAM and its new ADAM ROCKS stable-mate. And this is just the beginning – Opel experts predict the use of tools from a 3D printer will continue to grow. “In the future, more and more 3D assembly tools will be integrated into the production process,” says Sascha Holl.

For production of the ADAM ROCKS, to be launched in September, the Eisenach carmakers use an assembly jig – a specific, fixed frame – made by a 3D printer to produce the vehicle name logotype on the side window. And for the windshield, a 3D-printed inlet guide is also used to simplify the mounting process and help ensure a precise alignment. Other tools from the printer are used to fasten the chrome step plate on ADAM ROCKS door openings and install the standard Swing Top canvas roof. Around 40 such assembly aids and jigs are used in Eisenach.

This equipment was developed on the computer during the development phase of ADAM ROCKS. “It enables us to quickly adapt the parts. If something changes on the vehicle, we can easily modify the tool with just a few clicks,” explains Holl. “The 3D printing process enables us to produce every imaginable form and shape. Unlike conventional manufacturing technology, we don’t have to accept any limitations.”

The Virtual Engineering Team in Rüsselsheim only has to reach into their bag of tricks when it comes to the maximum size of parts built. Using sophisticated technology to join a number of smaller elements, it is possible to produce larger parts. For instance, when developing an assembly aid for the side sill or the rear spoiler of ADAM ROCKS.

During 3D printing, plastic is melted and laid down in successive layers, each just 0.25 mm thick. The plastic used is light, robust and versatile. Hollow spaces and overhangs are automatically treated with a filling material, which is later washed away in a type of dishwasher. “The process is comparable to bridge or balustrade construction,” says Holl. “There high or protruding elements must also be shored up and supported until everything has hardened off. Only then is the supporting framework removed.”

The small number of jigs required in final assembly was previously made by hand in an elaborate process using a milled cast and resin. Thanks to 3D printing, the production cost of these aids is now reduced by up to 90 percent. In addition, the printed tools are ready to use after just about eight hours, and are up to 70 percent lighter in weight. Another advantage is that these aids can be mechanically and chemically processed. For example, they can be drilled, milled, sanded, varnished and bonded, or connected and combined with various other materials. Ergonomic fine-tuning can also be carried out on a PC in a matter of minutes. “We can adapt the tools for each assembly situation, as well as make them user-friendly for our colleagues on the line,” adds Holl.

Production of the Opel Insignia and Cascada convertible also benefits from 3D printer tools, which will be introduced step-by-step for the assembly of other Opel models. The new Corsa, Vivaro and Mokka, which will begin rolling off the assembly lines in Zaragoza later this year, will be among models built with the help of tools from a 3D printer. Their increasing use makes Opel a leader in this field within the GM Group.

References:

ENGINEERING.COM
by http://www.engineering.com/Author/ID/8/TheEngineer | August 21, 2014

Photoshop’s 3D printing features

Time to brush up those Photoshop skills!

http://www.pcworld.com/…/adobe-photoshop-upgrades-its-3d-pr…

adobe photoshop 3d painting

Adobe boosted Photoshop’s 3D printing features in an update that rolled out Thursday, part of a bid to further improve the software’s 3D printing capabilities.

Users can download the update, version 2014.1.0, by looking for the update in the Adobe Creative Cloud application, Adobe said.

In January, Adobe pushed Photoshop Creative Cloud into 3D printing, allowing designers to take objects created with Photoshop’s 3D controls and transform them into physical objects. With the most recent updates, Adobe has sought to interject itself into the 3D creation workflow, taking objects created through other tools and giving them some final touches.

The new update includes support for 3D painting, or the ability to take an object and apply a texture to it. In addition, Adobe added support for new 3D file formats including VRML, U3D, PLY, and IGES, streamlined the workflow, and added support for multiple print jobs on the same print bed. Finally, Photoshop now supports the MakerBot Replicator 5th Generation desktop printer and the DMM.com 3D print service, found in Japan.

PCWORLD.COM