3D printed circular saw

http://3dprint.com/86755/tiny-3d-printed-circular-saw/

sawani

Man 3D Prints the World’s Smallest Working Circular Saw And It’s Amazing!

“Honey, I shrunk the power tools!”

Perhaps you remember a story that we broke back in March, concerning a New Zealand man, named Lance Abernethy, who 3D printed the world’s smallest working power drill. Lance’s creation garnered him the attention of the international media, and apparently enticed him to continue his efforts of creating even more miniature working power tools.

Now Abernethy has revealed his latest creation, perhaps even more impressive than his previous. He has unveiled a miniature 3D printed circular saw, which he 3D printed on his Ultimaker 2 machine, after designing the individual parts using a software called Onshape. The parts were printed in PLA at a layer height of 21-40 microns and shell thickness of 0.5mm. The printing process took less than 1 hour to complete in total.

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The miniature saw is printed in 4 pieces, including 2 halves for the main housing, a saw guard, plus a blade holder, just like your typical full size circular saw would have. It is powered by the same hearing aid battery that powers his miniature drill, and it has a button on the handle that turns it on.

“The saw was just a natural progression from the drill,” Abernethy tells 3DPrint.com. “I would like to be able to make a whole set of power tools just like my Makita set I have. I’m not sure how many I will get around to making though.”

SAMSUNG CSC

While the saw operates like an actual full size circular saw, Abernethy says that it can not cut through anything at this point in time. Although he plans to iterate upon the design and create one that actually can cut in the near future.

“I also printed little brief cases for them to go in as you can see in the video (below),” Abernethy explained. “I actually made this a few months ago and will start making more stuff soon, once I get back into 3d printing. I will eventually get around to making something with parts people can easily buy and print, and then do a tutorial on how to make it.”

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It should be interesting to see just what Abernethy comes up with next. Obviously this won’t be the last we see of him or his extremely minute creations. What do you think about the world’s smallest working circular power saw? What tools would you like to see 3D printed next? Discuss in the 3D Printed Circular Saw forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3dprint.com

by  | AUGUST 4, 2015

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3D printed estate set

http://edition.cnn.com/2015/06/03/americas/architect-3d-prints-luxury-estate/

An artists rendering of a 3D-printed estate which is set to be built by architect Adam Kushner in conjunction with 3D-printing firm D-Shape.

The luxury 3D printed estate set to be made from sand, dust and gravel

(CNN)There’s already a 3D-printed house being built in the Netherlands. In China, 3D-printed mansions are reportedly on the rise.

Now, a 3D printed estate featuring a swimming pool, jacuzzi, car port and 2,400 square foot house could be coming to a sleepy plot of land in upstate New York.

The ambitious project is being undertaken by New York City architect Adam Kushner, alongside partners including 3D-printing pioneer Enrico Dini and his D-Shape firm.

Kushner told CNN that surveying has already begun with excavation work also set to commence soon.

The swimming pool and jacuzzi are penciled in to be completed by December 2015 while construction of the house is expected to continue until the end of 2017, he says.

An artists rendering of the pool house which will be 3D printed by D-Shape.

But the project hinges on getting the giant 3D printer, which will be used to produce the digitally designed building blocks of the estate on-site, into the country.

The device is currently in Italy after it was originally being built for a project partly funded by the Italian defense agencies. Military clearance is now required before the green light is given to export the printer to the United States, Dini says.

The delay in receiving this clearance is part of the reason the project has been held up since it was first announced back in August 2014.

“We are now waiting (for) permission to borrow the printer (from the military),” Dini says. “If I had another printer I’d send it there tomorrow, but unfortunately we don’t have and must wait.”

The litmus test

Whatever the import-export issues, Kushner says he sees the estate project as a test of D-Shape’s printer technology and its distinctive method.

This practice entails collecting sand, dust and gravel on site and mixing them with a magnesium-based binding agent to produce the 3D-printed building blocks required to piece the estate together. According to literature on the D-Shape website, the material produced by the printer is “similar to marble” in its constitution.

This technique is vastly different from other 3D-printing methods, Kushner says, and enables the production of many more “sculptural forms” that simply aren’t possible with other systems.

If D-Shape can prove its technology works and is efficient for a project of this size, Kushner believes it could lead to all manner of possibilities in architecture and construction. Not only could it be faster and safer than existing construction methods, he says, it could also end up being cheaper, more streamlined and of higher quality.

A Dini 3D printer like this one will be used to construct Adam Kushner's 3D printed estate in upstate New York.

And although the 3D-printed estate is something only the very wealthiest would be able to replicate, Kushner sees D-Shape’s construction methods benefiting the less fortunate as well.

“This will serve as a way of using our project to … pave the way for more humanitarian purposes that we see as the highest and best use for our technology,” he says.

“If we can build a simple pool house, I can print thousands of refugee housings. If I can build a pool, I can print underwater reefs (which he says D-Shape has already done before) to repair bridges, piers and infrastructures.”

A technology on the rise?

Integrating progressively more advanced 3D-printing methods into the construction industry has been a topic that has generated many eye-catching headlines in recent years.

The process of contour crafting — where large 3D printers are assembled on a building site (much like what will happen on Kushner’s estate) and programmed to construct pre-designed concrete structures and their relevant sub-components — was put forward by Dr. Behrokh Khoshnevis of the University of Southern California as far back as 2009.

Khoshnevis told industry website 3DPrint.com earlier this year that the first printers large enough for his version of contour crafting should become available within the next two years. He added that the method could even be used to build high-rise structures within ten years.

Chinese firm WinSun seemed to take inspiration from Khoshnevis’ methods when they claimed to have 3D printed a mansion and six-story tower block in the city of Suzhou, eastern China earlier this year.

Meanwhile, in the Netherlands, DUS Architects continue to piece together a 3D-printed house using its “KamerMaker” machine. Company co-founder Katherine De Wit described the DUS technique as being a potentially valuable tool that could be added to those already used to build homes.

An artists impression of the DUS Architects 3D printed house.

Other experts, however are more cautious about the immediate potential of 3D-printing technology in the construction industry.

In an interview with CNN in 2014, Dr. Phil Reeves, managing director of UK-based 3D-printing consultancy and research firm Econolyst, described 3D-printing a house on site like that planned by DUS as counter to existing building techniques which are already relatively efficient.

Then there are other fast-developing building methods like prefabricated construction which entails manufacturing components in a factory before transporting and rapidly piecing them together on a building site.

Chinese firm Broad Sustainable Building claimed to have used this method to piece together a 57-story skyscraper in just 19 days earlier this year.

For Kushner, however, the benefits of large-scale 3D-printing are many and will likely increase as the technology becomes more advanced.

“This is not superfluous, nor a lazy architects idyll,” he says. “I think it’s as important as the automobile was in changing the design of cities or how the printing press altered communication.”

“Why? Because it democratizes construction and architecture and puts it into everyone’s hands, just like the camera phone made everyone a photographer. Not everyone is good at it but everyone can become one.”

edition.cnn.com

3D printed gun as a form of protest

Protesters in Texas Took to the Streets Armed with a 3D Printer in A Bid to Stir Things Up

http://3dprint.com/37168/ghost-gunner-texas-open-carry/

photo by come and take it texas

It’s a controversial issue, and activists are using a tool which sprung from the 3D printed gun movement to draw attention to their stance on gun rights.

A group of gun rights activists gathered outside the Texas State Capitol in Austin yesterday intent on pushing lawmakers to relax open-carry gun laws, and the “featured attraction” was a CNC device which uses 3D printed parts, the Ghost Gunner.  With this device the activists proceeded to ‘3D print’ a gun right in front of the Capitol building.

The gathering was organized by Come And Take It Texas, or CATI, and the groupsays it’s “been the front line for gun rights since their inception two years ago.” The bill was filed by state Rep. Jonathan Stickland, R-Bedford, and he says BH 195 is aimed at eliminating the state’s handgun licensing requirements.

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As odd as it may seem given the state’s reputation, Texas is one of only six US states where citizens are not allowed to openly carry handguns.

As for the Ghost Gunner, it’s made by Defense Distributed, the Austincompany famous, or infamous depending on your position on the matter, for 3D printing the Liberator plastic gun. The Ghost Gunner is a small CNC device capable of machining a receiver for the AR-15.

A large share of the controversy began with the 3D printing of the Liberator, and the desktop CNC Ghost Gunner is a direct descendant of that effort by Defense Distributed.

“Anybody can purchase one of these to print firearms in their own homes,” Murdoch Pizgatti, president of CATI, told NBC News.

kids-with-guns

The Ghost Gunner uses an aluminum block that’s referred to as “80 percent lower” – a piece which can be purchased for less than $100 – to fabricate a working receiver in around 15 minutes. Defense Distributed calls the Ghost Gunner project “a non-profit, open source hardware effort.” They add that the Ghost Gunner schematics and design files will be published into the public domain.

The device uses 3D printable jigs to hold the receiver part in place as milling steps are completed. When milling an 80% AR-15 lower receiver, the company says two jig pieces are required to secure the lower in place as the ‘trigger pocket’ is milled, and two more jig pieces are used to drill the trigger pin holes.

Defense Distributed says that, in general, using their device to manufacture semi-automatic firearms like the AR-15 lower receivers is legal for private individuals. They add that some states and municipalities restrict either the manufacture of certain firearms, or more recently, the personal manufacture of a firearm with a 3D printer or CNC machine.

As for federal laws, they prohibit the manufacture of firearms for future sale without a Federal Firearms License. According to the ATF, allowing others the use personal CNC equipment may constitute manufacturing, so Defense Distributed tells Ghost Gunner owners to avoid printing firearms for other individuals.

Let’s hear your thoughts on what, if anything, should be done by authorities to make sure these weapons do not fall in the hands of crazed maniacs. Discuss this story in the 3D Printed Guns Add to Open Carry Debate in Texas thread on 3DPB.com.

ggg

3DPRINT.COM
by  | JANUARY 14, 2015

3D printing vs sanitation and shelter

Take a look at how Oxfam and other NGO’s are using 3D printing as an innovative humanitarian tool!

http://www.theguardian.com/…/3d-printing-development-sanita…

Oxfam is already printing taps in the Middle East, and is considering printing emergency housing. But what are the cost and the caveats of this new technology?

3D printing has been billed the third industrial revolution and has already proved useful for development. The first printed prosthetic limbs are helping victims of conflict to regain their independence, while scientists are working on bioprintingmethods which could soon see the first ever printed human heart used to help save a life.

Project Daniel in South Sudan has shown the potential of 3D printing for international development organisations working in healthcare, but what other uses could it have for professionals working in the field?

Oxfam is already trialling 3D printing in its Lebanon office as part of efforts to improve sanitation across the country. The charity was donated a 3D printer by the company iMakr, and has used it to build parts of taps and faucets, as well as replacing missing parts of British sanitation kits imported to the region.

“We have an engineer there who is trying out different designs. Mostly it is around handwashing devices. We want to make it easy for people to wash their hands – that’s the type of thing that we are trying,” explains Andy Bastable, Oxfam’s head of water and sanitation.

“We have problems when we have got British fittings and we need to replace it [overseas]. In the the future, we think we could just make them. I think this is an idea that will get stronger, and that will be able to make larger and larger things. We think that 3D printing could be part of the future, supplying [us] in an emergency with lots of different bits of kit.”

Oxfam is also considering how 3D printing might help it develop emergency shelters. Gilles Retsin, co-founder of Softkill Design, is one of the first designers working on 3D printed housing in the UK. “There is quite a lot of interest in it from people involved in emergency housing and crisis housing. They come from the view that it might be possible to print something very quickly in an unexpected site without the need for shipping anything. We would transport a printer and then we would use the materials on the site, such as sand,” he says.

Although 3D printing is unlikely to replace tent villages as an immediate source of shelter for communities in crisis – following conflict or extreme weather, for example – it may have other uses. As it takes just 24 hours to build a set of rooms using local materials fed into a printer, it may have a useful function as a way to quickly and cheaply build medium-term accommodation during the rebuilding process.

It also boasts the great benefit of allowing NGOs and their staff to design bespoke products for their use. This means designs can be altered to take into account the materials available on site, but also the specific religious or cultural needs of a community.

Martin Cottingham, advocacy manager at Islamic Relief, says: “It’s important to deliver shelter as quickly and as cost-effectively as possible in an emergency, but cultural sensitivity is also important. It’s no good having shelters that people don’t want to use because nobody has thought about the cultural dimension – the typical arrangements for sleeping, cooking and washing in the communities affected.” He concludes that 3D printing technology would be useful to the charity if it allowed this flexibility, while not resulting in a significant additional cost per unit.

For development organisations, it’s essential that 3D printing helps to support efforts to build local economies, rather than replace local tradesmanship in designing and building the tools that NGOs need to use in their work.

Mario Flores, director of field operations, disaster risk reduction and response atHabitat for Humanity International, said this would be the key test for 3D printing – along with how much money it could save, how culturally appropriate the end products are and how well those products compare to similar, locally-made alternatives. “Until this and other technologies can demonstrate positive outcomes in each of these litmus tests, they cannot be considered a solution at scale for humanitarian crises,” Flores says.

As the technology matures and becomes cheaper and simpler to operate, development professionals working across the specialisms – from healthcare, to sanitation, to emergency housing – will be able to experiment with its applications more easily. However, some are more sceptical about the prospect of new technology solving what are longstanding and very difficult challenges for NGOs and governments dealing with crises.

“There is a lot of technology innovation, targeting crisis application where there are very large budgets available and pressure to solve problems quickly and visibly,” says Maggie Stephenson, an adviser to UN Habitat. “There is a saying in relation to housing that you shouldn’t experiment on people who have no choice. Experiments in housing are expensive and last a long time, even if they are in emergency shelter.”

Stephenson says development professionals should always remain “aware that the pioneers of this technique, like the pioneers of any technique, are always the most enthusiastic about its potential”.

THEGUARDIAN.COM
by  | Tuesday 5 August 2014 

3D printed braille phone

World’s first braille phone launched in Australia!!

How were the obstacles in this project overcome? 3D printing, of course!

http://www.couriermail.com.au/…/story-fnn9c0gx-122700136687…

Graph for OwnFone launches first 3D-printed braille phone in Australia

Australia’s vision-impaired community has a new and affordable connectivity tool at its disposal as the world’s first braille mobile phone launches in Australia.

The stripped-down OwnFone handset — there’s no touchscreen, no text messaging and no voicemail — can be programmed with up to three personalised numbers, each dialled from 3D-printed buttons labelled in braille.

It’s the 3D-printing technology has enabled the British company that produces the handsets to bring costs down for vision-impaired consumers.

“In the past, the cost of developing a braille phone versus the market size has been a barrier to entry,” OwnFone’s UK-based inventor, Tom Sunderland, said.

“3D printing provides a fast and affordable way to overcome this barrier.”

Through a wholesale partnership with Vodafone, Australian customers can now purchase the handset from $89, with a range of pre- and post-paid price plans starting at $2.35 a week.

OwnFone has been selling its handsets in Britain for the last 2.5 years. Its Australian operations, headed by Brad Scoble, launched in April with the release of non-braille handsets designed for elderly and primary school-age children.

“The only difference is in the design of the phone,” Mr Scoble said.

“Kids and seniors have the option of words or images as buttons, whereas people who are blind have braille.”

At $69, OwnFone’s non-braille handsets are even cheaper, but Mr Scoble toldBusiness Spectator the cost of producing the braille version is higher.

“Braille is a very unique language and the alphabet’s very lengthy, so we had to make some modifications to the phone to make it user-friendly,” Scoble said.

Additionally, the manufacturing process requires each individual handset to be customised, with users providing up to three contact numbers (for example, of family, friends, carers or Triple Zero) which are then pre-programmed into the handset and printed on the front in braille.

OwnFone consulted extensively the vision-impaired community in Britain in developing the product to best meet users’ requirements.

Mr Scoble said the handset had been “very well received” in Britain because it was “very simple to operate”.

“There’s one-button dialling and any-key call-answering, so there are a few features about the handset that make it quite different,” he said.

Local vision-impaired advocates are also welcoming the product.

Australian Communications Consumer Action Network disability policy adviser Wayne Hawkins said the affordability of the OwnFone handset was a “positive addition” to the choices for the 35,000 or so consumers in Australia who are blind.

Mr Scoble told Business Spectator OwnFone is currently working on a new handset and will “potentially” look at moving into the popular wearables space as it continues servicing its target seniors market.

“We’re looking at how best to meet the needs of the community, through for instance how to tie the handset in with hearing aids and improving the way the handset will provide voice feedback to customers as well,” Mr Scoble said.

“We’re certainly not in the business of trying to compete with smartphone people.”

COURIERMAIL.COM.AU
by Hannah Francis | July 25, 2014 4:00am