Katy Perry and 3D printing?

What Do Katy Perry and 3D Printing Have to do With Each Other? Click the Link Below to Find Out!

http://goo.gl/qxFPUI

While the nation identifies with the Super Bowl’s insta-star Left Shark, Katy Perry’s lawyers are apparently more the Right Shark type. They issued a cease and desist letter (see below) to on-demand 3D printing service Shapeways on Tuesday, demanding a 3D model depicting Left Shark be taken down.

Shapeways complied, and Fernando Sosa, the designer behind the model, has now posted it on Thingiverse. Unlike on Shapeways, Thingiverse models are free and must be 3D printed by the downloader.

Left Shark, as it appeared Thursday on Thingiverse.

Shapeways confirmed the letter and takedown, stating:

It’s a shame because we love our community and always want to be able to support their designs. That’s part of the reason why our work with Hasbro is so fun! It’s allowing fans to create products truly inspired by the things they personally enjoy. We know these things can happen when you have a lot of user-generated content, but hopefully more brands (and celebrities!) will take note and want to work together with fans to create amazing products!

NYU law professor Christopher Sprigman tweeted that he believes Left Shark is not copyrightable because it qualifies as a “useful article,” which would mean it is not protected the same way as an artistic work.

Both Thingiverse and Shapeways are home to scores of ostensibly copyrighted models, including memes. While it’s hard to say who has the rights to sad Keanu or doge, Pokemon figurines are a little more black and white. Both sites have received takedown requests in the past, but designs tend to stay up until a letter arrives.

The Joseph Ducreux, AKA "Disregard females, acquire currency", meme, 3D printed by Shapeways.

IP law finds itself in an unchartered space with the rise of 3D printing, though new models are beginning to emerge. Shapeways has entered into partnerships with a few companies like Hasbro that allow anyone to model their characters, and then funnel some of the sale proceeds back to the copyright holder.

If you absolutely must get your hands on a 3D printed Left Shark, Sosa is urging people to download it from Thingiverse before the site receives a similar letter.

Left Shark rose to fame during the Super Bowl halftime show Sunday. Katy Perry sang “Teenage Dream” among dancing beach balls, trees and two sharks. While Right Shark had the dance down, Left Shark had to improvise a bit. But that didn’t stop him from dancing with everything his little shark heart had to give.

3D print like lawyers aren’t watching, dance like Left Shark.

GIGAOM.COM
by  | February 5, 2015 – 1:47 PM PDT
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Library of 3D printed resources

Check out how much 3D printing has to offer for the visually impaired!

http://3dprint.com/19173/librarylyna-3d-print-blind/

3D Printed Model of an Isosceles Triangle

With all the hoopla and headlines surrounding 3D printing innovation, it’s also good to get back to basics and focus on the major impact this technology can have in the classrooms–especially in those of the visually impaired.

Educational tools geared specifically toward blind students can improve their quality of life substantially—as well as improving drop-out rates across the board. The team at LibraryLyna is on a mission to create and provide both teacher and student accessibility to these educational tools by ‘hosting the largest collection of high quality educational 3D models to foster learning of the blind and visually impaired.

“Kevin’s simple, practical concept is revolutionary and will transform the education of the blind and visually impaired,” said Marc Ashton, CEO of Foundation for Blind Children.

Currently, according to the census, around 88% of citizens twenty five years and older in the U.S. have attained a high school degree or equivalent, while only 32.2% of visually impaired in the U.S. ages twenty one years and older have a high school diploma or equivalent. While visual status and educational status are not what define a person, anything that can be done to improve either of those issues is nothing but positive.

LibraryLyna 1

Through raising the bar—as well as the texture and dimension of learning tools for the blind,LibraryLyna also hopes to raise enthusiasm levels andexpectations for graduation rates. Many teachers of visually impaired students are left with the frustrating and somewhat heartbreaking task of trying to teach their students while lacking the proper tools, forcing them to try and make homemade resources on their own. This would be a task for teachers instructing students who are not visually impaired, thus understandably making the challenge virtually impossible for TVI’s.

“Many times, it is too difficult to create these models from scratch. We focus on creating and hosting this ‘missing’ educational material,” Kevin Yang, President and Founder of LibraryLyna, told 3DPrint.com. “We are actively trying to level the playing field; maybe with our help, blind students will have the same opportunities as their sighted peers.”

Yang’s father, Dr. Peichun Yang, is the co-founder of LibraryLyna. The senior Yang is a blind engineer and scientist with a Ph.D in Material Science. Having lost his sight seventeen years ago, he has years of knowledge when it comes to technology to aid the visually impaired.

3D Printed Multiplication Table

The young and very bright Kevin Yang does not remember a time when his dad could see, and he sometimes endured great frustration and challenge in trying to explain his creative and interesting ideas to his father. Eventually he was intrigued and inspired by 3D printing because he discovered an excellent method of demonstrating and communicating ideas and designs to the elder Yang.

With this inspiration and motivation, he felt he was given a purpose in life at a young age.

“3D modeling came with a good amount of struggling and frustration, but fortunately the things that I wanted to explain to my dad were simple and geometric, using only basic techniques of 3D design. This technology was a revelation!” says Yang. “After printing a few of my models through 3D printing vendors such as Shapeways and Materialise and giving them to my dad, I didn’t even have to do any explaining.”

It was no fleeting interest or hobby for sure, and in 2013, Polymer Braille Inc. invited Kevin Yang to use 3D design and printing to create a complicated multidimensional concept that would help to explain to blind people the mechanical mechanisms of a braille display.’ This 3D printed display was very inspiring to his father.

“My dad and I put 3D printing on a pedestal, as if it were the holy grail for clear communication,” says Yang.

Kevin and his father both agreed they had the tools together to help visually impaired students, and Yang, after four years in attendance at the National Federation of the Blind Convention, was a presenter regarding the work he had done in the classroom with 3D printing. With the help of the Diagram Center, support from employees at Pearson, and the Foundation for Blind Children, Kevin founded LibraryLyna.

LibraryLyna is working to offer a comprehensive package that gives support to the teachers and students, allowing the teachers to contact LibraryLyna with a specific request for what 3D printed tools they need for lessons, and then LibraryLyna goes to work on getting them what they need, most often through ‘curating pre-existing art.

“We find useful models from websites like Thingiverse, and host them on our website which offers a screen-reader, which is software that blind individuals use to navigate electronic devices,” Yang told 3DPrint.com.“LibraryLyna is taking the initiative to move 3D printing into hands of those who really need it.”

LibraryLyna is working to make sure that classrooms for visually impaired students are thriving, and that teachers never have to worry about finding resources within the inventory of STEM-based 3D printed materials that LibraryLyna will provide them.

“If pictures are worth a thousand words, 3D models should be worth a million words–heck, even a billion,” says Keven Yang.

Have you been involved in 3D printing any items for individuals with handicaps or visual impairment? Tell us about it in the LibraryLyna Forum thread at 3DPB.com.

parts 1

parts 2

3DPRINT.COM
by  | OCTOBER 14, 2014

3D printed hands

Adding a superhero’s touch to prosthetic hands 🙂

http://techcrunch.com/…/3d-printed-hands-just-got-better-t…/

What could be better than giving disabled kids a new pair of hands? How about slapping a set of claws on those hands!

Aaron Brown, a maker and volunteer for the group Enabling The Future, has been building 3D printed prosthetic hands for kids who are missing fingers. These hands are given away for free and the group has made countless children quite happy.

Now they can be happier. Brown built a set of Wolverine claws that are compatible with the free prosthetic hand plans available on Thingiverse.

“The Comic loving nerd inside of me (along with some Facebook friends) said there is no way I can make a Wolverine hand without CLAWS…so I modeled some in Sketchup the morning before the makerfaire, printed ‘em, spray painted ‘em silver and velcro’d ‘em on there. Turned out pretty darn cool!” said Brown.

“I worked for about 7 years in nightclub security, with a few less exciting factory jobs before that.
Playing around with technology has always been a passion and hobby on the side and when my grandfather passed away unexpectedly last year, I was left with a small amount of funds in his will – just enough to start building my own business,” he said. Now he is working on a small 3D print shop and has been building Wolverine-themed hands for kids since he showed the first hand at the Grand Rapids Maker Faire.

It’s great to see 3D printing become truly useful and it’s even more exciting to see folks who can move from part-time nightclub bouncer to full time maker with a little time and effort.

TECHCRUNCH.COM
by  | Sep 6, 2014

3 Incredibly Easy Steps to 3D Print Your Product

Confused about how a 3D file becomes an object?

This short and sweet guide is tailor made to help you through the simple process of acquiring a 3D printed product from Malta 3D Printing. Anyone with a basic understanding of computers will be able to glide through these steps with ease.

1) Get a 3D File

Visit Thingiverse or Youmagine, two of the most popular databases jam-packed with 3D files, all available for free. Enter keywords into the search bar (such as ‘Batman’ or ‘Fishing lure’) and a number of results will pop up.

Imagine Star Wars IV is about to hit the theaters and you’d like an eye-catching collectable to take with you – go for a light saber or a Storm trooper helmet! Go wild, use your imagination!

If you feel swamped with choices or can’t find what you’re looking for, share your concept with us via Facebook and we’ll lend a hand.

If you’ve designed a file yourself, we’ll happily accept that too. Generally, we work with .STL and .OBJ file formats, but other file types are also acceptable.

2) Send us the 3D File or a Link to the File

The aforementioned databases (Thingiverse & YouMagine) allow anyone to download the 3D files required, so when you’ve found what you’d like feel free to send us the file/s via Facebook or e-mail.

Alternatively, you can just send us the link. After doing so, we can discuss customization options which include:

  • Size
  • Colour
  • Quality
  • Resolution
  • Material
  • Infill (density)

If you’re uncertain on any of the above, we’ll be happy to explain in further detail once you’re in contact with us.

3) Receive a Quote From us and Collect Your Product!


Once you’ve chosen the specifications (if any) for your file, we’ll quote you a price and if you’re happy with it, we can begin printing.

We can alter the product size or quality to match your budget, meaning your favourite prints will always be affordable. Collect your product from our Birkirkara store or have it personally delivered to your doorstep.

Hint: When searching, remember that 3D Printing’s net has been cast far and wide: games, gadgets, ornaments, tools, toys and much, much more – someone has probably already made a file for it.

Previous: Malta Comic Con 2014 Recap

iPhone 6 Special

In light of Apple’s latest record-breaking smartphone, Malta 3D Printing has selected a number of useful printables to enhance the iPhone experience.

Early purchasers may have been left with a sour taste in their mouth due to some unforeseen problems, but our selection of unique products will help turn their frowns upside down.

This stylish iPhone 6 charger is sure to save your blushes in a sticky situation – remember that time you accidentally deserted your date, only because your iPhone ran out of battery? What about that time you got lost in the woods searching for your camping buddies?

iPhone6 3200mah Charger with USB Power Out 3d printed Accessories Music
The 3200mah Charger by CustomPowerSolar

(Image from Shapeways)

This versatile gadget annihilates any chance of those awkward situations becoming reality.

Not only does it charge your iPhone faster than a regular charger, it also extends the battery life. Gone are the days when our trusty cellphone batteries would last a couple of days in the red zone. In 2014, low-battery means it’s time to panic!

Using Wi-Fi, 3G, or an application (practically any smartphone function) drains the battery like crazy.

Simply slot your brand new iPhone 6 or 6 Plus into the case and voila.

For the energy conscious customer, a solar-powered version is also available, helping you bring your electricity bill down.  The electronics required are simple to attach to the case, but a full-kit version with no assembly is also available.

If you’re looking for something simpler, this standard iPhone dock will do the job.

There’s nothing unique or special about it, but sometimes simplicity is all you need. On that note, 3D printing marketplaces are now jam-packed with different iPhone 6 cases. Some are quite stylish, like this steampunk case, and others quite basic.

iPhone 6 Dock by lclemente

(Image from Thingiverse)

While you’re still buzzing from the familiar smell of a freshly opened iPhone, savor the moment by blasting your favourite tunes. Should Apple’s sound hardware not provide you with the kick you needed, try a set of 3D printed enhancement speakers.

This model by Thingiverse user Datheus is sure to turn a quiet night in with friends into a thumping house party. All that’s required is for users to place their smartphones into the device and prepare for the onslaught of noise complaints.

Speaker for iPhone 6 & iPhone 6 Plus

iPhone users on the go will be tired of fumbling around whilst driving in search of their trusty smartphone – a recipe for disaster. Imagine dodging traffic as it rings away in your bag or pocket, only for you to have missed the call by the time you’ve fished it out.

Debuting on Thingiverse only two days ago, this simple case protects the iPhone and allows drivers to safely answer calls without too much attention diverted from the road.

It’s also been modified to accommodate for charging.

iPhone 6 Car Holder by blarbles

(Image from Thingiverse)

Only released a few weeks ago now, the list of 3D printable enhancement products for the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus is still relatively small – but having smashed all previous iPhone and smartphone sales records, we can expect the list to grow quickly.

Tabletop Fun

A bright mind and a 3D printer can go a long way. Combining aesthetics and entertainment value, 3D printed games range from chess sets and larger-than-life Rubik’s cubes to entirely new gaming universes created within a matter of days.

Effectively changing the rules of manufacturing, 3D printing will have fans of tabletop gaming stoked when they realize the scale of their favourite pastime just got a whole lot bigger. Printing already has a place in gamers’ hearts’, producing key items like dice and custom landscapes – essential for any serious tabletop gamer.

Exciting breakthrough projects like Breach, Pocket Dungeon and Pocket Tactics have invaded the market dominated by Games Workshop. According to their Thingiverse pages, some of these exciting are yet to be fully completed.

Pocket Tactics

(Image from Wired)

Pocket Tactics is perhaps the most famous of the bunch, and is basically the size of a small travel game – you can play it on any flat surface. Creator Arian Croft, also known as ‘Dutchmogul’, claims to have thought of the idea on a Tuesday night, and by Friday had a functioning prototype ready.

While designers like Croft are busy ping-ponging new ideas around the Ill Gotten Games office, well-established games like Warhammer 40k and Warmachine may need to look over their shoulders.

Sure, it will be difficult for small companies to pry the hands of loyal gamers away from the most popular tabletop games, but what if they bought miniatures from a different company? Some official gaming kits can cost hundreds of euros, and more.

3D printing is allowing for high-quality miniatures, and Hero Forge serves as the proof in the pudding. Their Kickstarter page reveals the length at which they’re willing to help their customers customize their favourite gaming pieces.

Ironically, the digital revolution is helping the analog world.

Customize and materialize!
A Unique Miniature built by Hero Forge

(Image from Kickstarter)

Raising over $360,000 (more than triple their original target), their Kickstarter financial goal was met back in February. The appeal to gamers lies in the unprecedented level of detail one can add, with users able to choose different armour, poses, weapons, equipment and character sizes.

Moving on to a different branch of games completely, a quick look at the leading online marketplaces like Shapeways or Thingiverse will reveal the extent of the different board games, puzzles, desk toys and life-like models available.

Chess fans will feel right at home here, as the classic game has been a target of 3D technicians around the world. Since all it requires are pieces and a board to play on, the levels of customization are limitlesss.

Minecraft Chess Set

(Image from Thingiverse)

If you fancy novelty, check out this portable Star Trek 3D chess set, or if you’re eager to take on two foes at once, this impressive three player set from Acryl should do the trick. Lord of the Rings fans will melt when they gaze upon this classic chess set with characters from Tolkien’s universe.

Our next pick is for the puzzle freaks out there. If you’re a fan of the age-old Rubik’s cube, this extra-large, fully-functional 3x4x5 cuboid will certainly catch your eye. Now being produced en masse, this nifty puzzle requires a bit of DIY assembly – requiring users to use their own springs, screws and washers.

The 3D printing gods have been kind enough to provide us with entertaining products in bountiful amounts, and for this we are very grateful. At this rate, our children of the future will be spoiled for choice!

3D Printing’s Musical Journey

Friends, customers, printaholics – lend us your ears and join us along a 3D printed musical adventure!

A recent post which featured one of Malta 3D Printing’s favourite little musical toys – a kazoo – inspired us to continue down this musical vein.

To place things into perspective, the 3D printable instruments of today are split into three categories.

Firstly, we have ‘experimental pieces’, which don’t have a conventional equal outside of the realm of 3D printing. Secondly, there are ‘enhanced instruments’, which improve the qualities of an already existing instrument thanks to 3D printing’s unique capabilities.

3D Printing Will Soon Turn This Design Into Reality

Finally, we have replications of existing instruments, which have no real added benefits compared to the traditional piece.

Pictured above is a prime example of a 3D printable musical piece still in experimental stages.

This unusual trumpet is reminiscent of a modern painter’s masterpiece rather than a practical musical device.  While this aesthetically pleasing instrument is yet to be created, there are others which are already in circulation.

The video below provides a quick explanation about a 3D printed flute. Using the powerful Objet500 Connex, this wind instrument’s 3D model was produced using Rhino.

In a different interview, flute player Seth Hunter emphasized the plastic flute’s acoustic similarities to the traditional metal ones. He also noted the slight misplacement of the keys – but remember – 3D printing encourages technicians to fix any minor errors in the subsequent print.

Created by yet another student from MIT, Amit Zoran was not far away from creating an exact replica, and this was way back in 2011. The traditional flute falls under the ‘existing instrument’ category, but our next pick certainly has its fair share of enhancements.

A laser-cut violin made from plywood, this stringed instrument was created by Ranjit Bhatnagar, a sound art enthusiast.

Its’ bulky wooden outer shell provides a stern contrast to the graceful sounds it can produce. Bhatnagar even took his masterpiece to the streets, inviting different violin players to fiddle away. Check out the videos here!

An ‘Enhanced Instrument’ – 3D Printed Violin

(Image taken from Thingiverse)

‘Ranjit’ as he is known on Thingiverse, has a personal page chocked full of free designs for different instruments – including an okarina, organ pipe, spiral panpipes and more.

Next up is another piece seeking to replicate an original design, but this one is slightly different. At four feet long, this home-made behemoth requires many printing sessions.

Clearly, this great bass recorder functions well – and the creator has since improved on his original work. The recorer is made up over 48 inches of PVC pipe measuring 1.5″, a few sections made of 2″ and multiple, custom built 3D pieces.

Created by Instructables user ‘sngai’, a quick internet search will reveal that opting to print this object as opposed to purchasing a store-bought one will save players a lot of money.

Who knows what the future holds? PLA pianos, ABS acoustic guitars and printable drum kits may soon become popular. As the number of 3D printed instruments continues to grow, its only a matter of time before musicians hop on the fast-moving bandwagon!

Retro Gaming Revolution

Wouldn’t it be nice to sit back and relax while a 3D printer churns out a video game console or a stylish controller?

It sounds unrealistic to say the least – but this seemingly futuristic production process is already happening!
We’re not talking about Xbox One’s and PS4’s being produced en masse – but rather, about retro gaming and innovative peripherals making a return thanks to 3D printing.
Courtesy of Adafruit, a New-York based outfit that incorporates 3D printing in certain products, the open-source community has received a major boost.
3D Printed Game Boy

In collaboration with the ground-breaking Raspberry Pi, 3D printing now boasts the quarter-century old Game boy in its arsenal. Created by Adafruit, Raspberry Pi – easily mistaken for a small motherboard – is actually a mini-computer you can plug into your TV or keyboard.
Capable of smooth emulation, all the Raspberry Pi requires to transform into a Game boy is a few hours of dedication and the necessary components. The video below directs viewers to a user-friendly assembly guide.

 

Once its assembled, all that’s left is to download your favorite old school games, (in ‘ROM‘ format)  upload them onto the SD card and begin button bashing.
Broken buttons on your new Game Boy after hours of playing? Malta 3D Printing has you covered!

Sure, a Game Boy isn’t a revolutionary product that’s going to change the world, but it definitely highlights 3D printing’s versatility. It can easily take devices that are decades old and breathe fresh life into them.

3D Printed Guitar/Controller

Adafruit once again provides the cornerstone of this 3D printed guitar, in the form of Bluefruit EZ-key. This nifty Bluetooth device allows users to turn any game-pad – or DIY project like the EZ-Key MIDI Guitar – into a fully functioning controller.


Besides looking totally awesome, the EZ-Key MIDI Guitar is multifunctional – serving either as a MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) instrument, DJ controller or a regular video game controller.

You could customize your own case in a material you desire, without worrying about 3D printing, but where’s the fun in that?


Printed in four separate pieces, this project is not for an amateur technician.

However, should you have the time, tools and patience available at your disposal, this guitar will definitely turn heads.

You can upload data from your musical masterpieces on the web, or quench your thirst for superficial crowd approval on Guitar Hero. You can even make playing everyday video games extremely challenging, by attempting to use it as a normal controller!

All 10 buttons are customizable, and there’s even a mic inside the casing which allows the LED lights to change depending on sound levels.
Portaberry Pi

Our favourite product from today’s post is the Portaberry Pi, another DIY project that uses Raspberry Pi.
Unveiled on 3DPrintBoard‘s online forum by a dedicated hobbyist, Portaberry Pi is the result of dozens of unselfish man hours aimed at providing gaming aficionados with a new toy to play with.

It may not be as recognizable as the Game Boy, a symbol of gaming culture – but it’s certainly easy on the eye and definitely captures the retro gaming feeling.


Recently featured on LifeHacker, the Portaberry Pi has been described as a “fantastic retro game machine,” and the best part about it – the files are all available for free on Thingiverse.
One can only hope that this mentality continues to proliferate throughout society, allowing people with technical know-how to share their knowledge and wisdom with others.