3D printed dress

A Stylish and Seductive Self-Defense Ready Dress!

http://goo.gl/sc5Z2L

CES 2015: Self Defense Wearable Made Using 3D Printing

CES 2015: Self Defense Wearable Made Using 3D Printing

Dutch designer adds detection and defense devices to “Spiderdress” offering.

Wearable technology would handily win the title of Emerging Technology of 2014 if not for the existence of 3D printing. Both have leapt forward this year in terms of price, variety, media attention and public acceptance…and both are poised to take 2015 by storm. Dutch designer/engineer Anouk Wipprecht plans to introduce a wearable this January that may place wearables in pole position for next year’s race.

Wipprecht’s “Spiderdress” exemplifies the trend of wearable technology. It’s an article of clothing that integrates robotics and sensors to give the wearer capabilities she wouldn’t have otherwise. In this case, the charmingly creepy Spiderdress is a self-defense aid that applies two kinds of sensors. The first tracks and analyzes body language and behavior out to a range of seven meters. The second tracks respiration to check if that presence makes the wearer nervous. If so, it jabs the interloper with a plastic leg to not-so-subtly suggest he create some distance.

Spider Dress Black.png Spiderdress 3Dprinting

The 3D printed bodice of the dress is light enough to wear for an event, but not on a long trek. Its defensive arms are arrayed to look like its namesake arachnid, down to sensor pods designed to look like eyes.

Clothing like the Spiderdress refines the concept of self-defense and expands it with the new miniaturized devices and expanded capacity the wearables trend brings to the party.

This is not Wipprecht’s first foray into weird science clothing that seems like something out of a comic book. Other examples of her work include a dress that makes the wearer immune to electrocution and clothes that detect the wearer’s mood and display. The Spider Dress will be unveiled to the public at the 2015 CES Convention in Las Vegas on January 6-9.

PSFK.COM
by JASON BRICK | 9 JANUARY 2015

3D printed headdress!

3D printing helps create this headdress that responds to brain activity! 🙂

http://www.inside3dp.com/3d-printed-headdress-shows-brain-a…

3D printed headdress maps thoughts with color. Credit - Sensoree

3D printed headdress shows your brain activity

It looks like you’ve come straight out of the shower and have forgotten to rinse your head after shampooing, but it’s far more fascinating than that. A fashion designer has created a 3D printed headdress that indicates what parts of your brain are working, by flashing different colors and sectors.

NEUROTiQ is the brainchild of fashion designer Kristin Neidlinger, the founder of SENSOREE, who used 3D printing with EEG brain sensors to create this unusual head attire.

A 3D printed brain animating accessory

Neidlinger calls NEUROTiQ a ‘brain animating fashion item’, as it maps your thoughts and then translates them into different colors. For instance, red indicates deep sleep, orange shows a meditative state, and consciousness is yellow-green. A combined color display of blue, purple and red displays indicate multi-sensory gamma brain activity.

SENSOREE specialize in creating wearable technology with a difference. Their designs often include bio.media, which reveals something about the wearer that they themselves might not be aware of communicating.

Futuristic materials

To create these designs, Neidlinger chose futuristic materials and typically embeds them with bio sensory technology. This not only provides an emotionally based creation controlled by our bodies, but allows others to be aware of our most intimate feelings.

3D printed neuron globules embedded with bio.media . Credit: Sensoree

“I love materials,” Neidlinger told 3DPrint.com, “I am a tactile enthusiast and have always loved the qualities of textures and structures of shape. The NeurotiQ was my first work with 3D printing. It was a grand experiment with materials. Currently, 3D prints are solid objects and it is challenging to find comfort and movement on the body. The fashions are more like armor.”

Mapping the inner workings of the human brain

The headdress itself has been 3D printed as a knitted design, which could been seen as representing the complicated pattern of neurons and synapses within our own brain structure. Embedded within the 3D knit are small light points that respond to Emotiv Epoc EEG brain sensors called neuron globules.

There are 14 of these LED 3D printed globules, which once embedded into the nylon ‘wool’, then had to be hand knitted into the headdress. This, as you can imagine, was not simple task, and took 102 hours to complete.

“To make the forms flexible, I thought to combine traditional hand craft of knitting with the new technology of 3D printing,” said Neidlinger. “3D printing offers sculptural detail that is so fantastically intricate. I love the fact that you can dream up any design and make it tangible. The possibilities seem so vast – from designing jewelry to automated space stations, so why not space station jewelry? I am especially fond of working with Formlab’s Form 1 3D printer. The resolution is so fine and the resin has a nice capture of light. So far we are delighted and cannot wait to see what will happen on the runway!”

3D printed fashion fads?

MACHINIC, a San Francisco based digital prototyping and consulting company, helped Neidlinger with her NEUROTiQ headdress. Her colleagues at SENSOREE Grant Patterson and Nathan Tucker also lent a hand.

What's next for 3D printed fashion? Credit: Sensoree

The headdress made its debut at New York Fashion Week, where it was accompanied by other 3D printed designs, including several 3D printed dresses.

As for wearable technology, it appears that we are now becoming obsessed with creating items of clothing that reveal more than we could possibly say on any social media site. But when will it be enough, and is anyone apart from ourselves actually that interested?

inside3dp.com

by Janey Davies | Sep 26 2014 , 09:00:50