3D printed replica of Shelby Cobra

http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/videos/a25659/watch-the-government-3d-print-a-shelby-cobra-replica/

Watch the government 3D print a Shelby Cobra replica

Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic printing uses highly energy-efficient manufacturing techniques created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

I’m not sure how this flew under our radar, but at this year’s Detroit Auto Show, back in January, the Department of Energy showed off an electric vehicle they’d 3D-printed out of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic. It was inspired by the iconic Shelby Cobra, but it most definitely wasn’t a replica.

The folks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory put it all together, to show off their Big Area Additive Manufacturing technology that could allow for rapid prototyping to fully move out of the clay-model era. The spokesperson for ORNL claims that their improvements on 3D printing with these materials substantially reduce energy use, and allow for energy-absorbing structures to be printed—technologies they think could prove revolutionary to the transportation sector.

roadandtrack.com

by  | APR 30, 2015  4:25 PM

3D printed 6th century sword

A Beautiful Recreation of a 6th Century Sword Created in 3D Studio Max

http://goo.gl/BKBpkW

A damaged sixth-century sword in a museum in Norway has been perfectly reproduced as new through 3D printing.
After hundreds of years as a great power, the Roman Empire finally crumbled, seeing its final days in the fifth century. Of course, the destruction of something so vast could only be achieved by a perfect storm of exacerbating factors – but one of the largest was the Germanic unrest. For centuries, the Germanic people had been revolting against Rome, and the pressure finally proved too much to bear.

During the final years and after the fall of Rome followed a period of migration across Europe, as first the Germanic and then the Slavic tribes packed up and made homes in new lands. It is during this Migration Period that a new type of sword emerged — a sort of halfway point between theRoman spatha, from which it had evolved, and the Viking sword, into which it would evolve.

Museums, of course, have some of these swords: greatly dilapidated, in many cases, but valuable artefacts of the time. However, the age and fragility means that although visitors can see the swords, they cannot touch them — cannot feel how the swords weighed and moved.

It is for this reason that the National Museum of Art in Norway approached Nils Anderssen, a game developer and school teacher with a passion for re-creating historical artefacts in his spare time. The museum is in possession of a particularly fine sword — a golden-hilted ring-sword, probably used only by kings and nobles. The ring affixed to the hilt is believed to be the symbol of an oath.

The instruction that the museum gave Anderssen was that the sword should look and feel exactly like the original would have done when it was new. This would allow museum visitors to have hands-on time with the sword, as a complement to admiring the relic safe in its glass case.

Anderssen has no experience in blacksmithing or goldsmithing, but he does know his way around 3D-modelling software — namely 3D Studio Max.

“In 3D Studio Max, I have good control over the thickness and size of the patterns and therefore avoided problems in printing,” he said. “Also, there are lot of sharp edges that are easy to do in 3D Studio Max.”

Using photographs of the real sword to gauge the dimensions of the hilt, Anderssen modelled the shape into basic polygons before working on carving out the fine details of the intricate design. Then he sent the finished model to i.materialise to be printed in bronze. When the finished print arrived, he cleaned up the details and had the pieces gilded and fitted with wooden inserts for stability before being attached to the blade.

“The whole project has been very interesting both as a learning experience and also to be able to use processes I already knew, but with more complexity,” Anderssen said. “In contrast to the digital work on screens, this is something you can pick up, look at and use. This is something I find very rewarding.”

CNET.COM
by | February 17, 2015 5:10 PM PST

3D printed wax replica of yourself

Need to a 3D print a life-size anatomically-correct wax replica of yourself? China’s got you covered 🙂

http://3dprint.com/8615/life-sized-wax-3d-print/

wax-feat

We have covered several companies which have been offering services where they 3D print small figures in the likeness of people, which are modeled after 3D scans, or even pictures taken with a smartphone camera. From bobblehead dolls, to large 3D models resembling a particular person, there is certainly no lack of choices available to consumers. Most of these 3D printed figures range in size from a couple of inches tall to about 18 inches in height, giving consumers many options which they can decide upon, based on their budgets.

As the 3D printing space becomes ever more popular, the novelty of such services may eventually wear off, unless of course there is continued innovation.  One company, based in China, called Qingdao Unique Products Develop Co. Ltd, is doing just that by offering life-sized 1:1 wax 3D prints of people.

Surely you have all seen the amazing work done on wax figures at the Madame Tussauds museum. These figures take months on end to create by hand, and cost more money than most people could ever hope to afford. In addition, hundreds, if not thousands of individual measurements need to be taken and calculated to ensure an anatomically precise model is created. This may not be the case for much longer though.

Qingdao Unique Products Develop Co., Ltd’s Anyprint brand has created a 3D printer, unlike any other, which they will be making available to businesses worldwide. The printer, which was revealed last month at the Second World 3D printing technology Industry Conference and Exposition held in Qingdao, Shandong, is a staggering two meters (approximately 6’6″) in height, allowing it to print 1:1 accurate 3D wax models of most human beings. According to the company, this is the world’s largest wax 3D printer on the market, and it uses fused deposition modeling technology.

“The world’s largest person-size 3D wax statues printer successfully developed by Unique Technology will dramatically change the rules of future characters, cartoon dolls and other cultural and creative market,” states the company’s blog.

The exact specifications of this printer have not been released as of yet, with further details forthcoming. Qingdao Unique Products Develop Co., Ltd is headquartered in Shandong, China, and has been in business for 13 years.  They sell a variety of 3D printers, both small and large, and even custom build printers for their clients specific needs.  Let us know what you think about this new giant wax 3D printer in the 1:1: wax printer forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3DPRINT.COM
by  | JULY 9, 2014

3D printed replica of tumour

A team of Spanish surgeons 3D printed an exact replica of a 5-year old’s tumour so that they could practice removing it, after having failed to remove the real thing twice. The third procedure was a success and they now expect the boy to make a full recovery without further operations.

The hospital is so impressed with this use of 3D printing to help simulate complicated procedures that two new models have already been commissioned for patients.

http://www.cnet.com/…/3d-printing-helps-surgeons-save-5-ye…/

A practice surgical procedure on a 3D-printed tumor has helped surgeons successfully remove the tricky real one from a 5-year-old boy in Spain.

The boy was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a common form of cancer in children that typically occurs around the stomach. Because of the locations of these types of tumors, surgery to remove them requires copious skill to not slice an artery and put the patient’s life in danger. After two unsuccessful attempts to remove the child’s tumor, it appeared inoperable.

“We tried the surgery twice but we failed because we could not access,” head surgeon Jaume Mora said at a press conference Wednesday. “Instead of surrendering, we tried to find a solution.”

Mora and his team at the Hospital Sant Joan de Deu in Barcelona turned to the CIM Foundation at the Polytechnic University of Catalonia to create a 3D-printed replica of the boy’s tumor so they could perfect their technique ahead of the surgery.

The team used a multi-material 3D printer to print hardened arteries and organs surrounding a translucent, soft resin so they could practice removing the tumor without damaging the boy’s innards. They also built a tumor-free replica of the child’s insides to see what he should look like once the cancer had been removed.

After undertaking a practice run a week and a half before the scheduled surgery, the surgeons successfully removed the tumor from the boy’s body. And they’re happy to report that they expect him to fully recover without the need for additional surgeries. In fact, the team and the hospital were so impressed with how the procedure went, they’ve commissioned 3D-printed models for two other patients.

This case represents one of the first times a personalized, 3D-printed organ has been used to successfully simulate a surgery, though it almost certainly won’t be the last. And it’s once again excitingto see that technology commonly used to print jewelry, figurines, and iPhone cases can also help medical professionals save lives.

CNET.COM

by | July 3, 20141:39 PM PDT