Injured toucan

http://www.cnet.com/news/injured-toucan-gets-new-beak-courtesy-of-3d-printing/

Injured toucan gets beak repair courtesy of 3D printing

A custom prosthetic beak-piece helps a toucan rescued from animal smugglers eat and groom normally once again.

3D printing isn’t just for people to make tchotchkes, buildings and Kraken dice. There’s a whole realm of the 3D-printing world involved with helping out animals who need a leg (Derby the dog), face (Akut-3 the turtle) or foot (Ozzie the goose). We can now welcome Tieta the toucan to their ranks.

Tieta was rescued in Brazil from an illegal animal seller. Half of her upper beak was missing. If you’ve ever seen a toucan, you know how magnificent their beaks are. Those bills are also practical in the wild, helping the birds reach for food and regulate their body temperature.

Tieta got a 3D-printed plastic prosthesis in late July to repair her bill. The process of creating the prosthesis was intensive. Designers used a taxidermy toucan as a model and several prototypes were printed. The lightweight final design received a coat of nontoxic varnish and a castor-oil-based polymer for durability. Collaborators on the project included wildlife preservation group Instituto Vida Livre and the Federal University of Rio de Janiero.

It took Tieta three days to adjust to the repaired appendage, but she is now able to eat normally. “We were feeding her fruit and she was ignoring the new beak. But when we gave her live animals, like maggots and cockroaches, she ate normally immediately,” Instituto Vida Livre director Roched Seba told BBC News.

It’s not known how Tieta lost part of her bill. It could have been an accident in the wild or through mistreatment by wildlife smugglers. The bird will spend the rest of her life in the safety of an animal sanctuary.

cnet.com

by | August 25, 20153:32 PM PDT

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Baseball – first pitch with 3D printed hand

http://www.cnet.com/news/adorable-5-year-old-throws-out-first-pitch-with-3d-printed-hand/

Adorable 5-year-old throws first pitch with 3D-printed hand

A little girl born with a rare medical condition throws out the first pitch at the Baltimore Orioles game on Monday thanks to a 3D-printed hand designed and printed by UNLV students.

Baltimore Orioles fans got quite a treat before Monday’s Major League Baseball game between the Orioles and the Oakland Athletics. Hailey Dawson, an adorable 5-year-old Orioles fan, threw out the first pitch with her custom-made, 3D-printed robotic hand.

Hailey has Poland syndrome, a disorder that causes children to be born with either missing or abnormal muscles on one side of the chest wall. Many with Poland syndrome – including Hailey – are also born with abnormalities of the hand, making it difficult or impossible to use their hands without prosthetics.

Prosthetics aren’t cheap — the functional myoelectric hands can cost tens of thousands of dollars — especially when they need to be replaced several times as a child grows. So, Hailey’s family turned to the engineering department at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) for help.

The faculty and students in the department delivered, designing and 3D-printing a robotic hand that lets Hailey do things like grip and throw a baseball, a talent she was more than happy to show off at Monday night’s game.

Hailey’s hand is based on the Flexy-Hand 2 project, and anyone can download plans for the customizable hand on Thingiverse, a site for discovering and sharing 3D-printed objects. The UNLV engineering department customized the Flexy-Hand for Hailey’s needs and size.

Hailey’s already on her third hand — the first one needed repairs and was then too small, and the second one accidentally broke when Hailey’s mother, Yong, was replacing the fishing line that functions as retractors for the fingers. The UNLV team is already working on her fourth, adding robotic functionality with each new iteration to make her arm even better.

In the video below, you can see that functionality in action as Hailey uses her custom Orioles-themed robot hand to throw out the first pitch. The pitch was caught by Hailey’s favorite player, Orioles third baseman Manny Machado.

If you want to see even more about Hailey’s adventures with her 3D-printed robot hand, you can check out some images from her trip on the Haileys_Hand Instagram page.

Because a hand that awesome definitely has to have its own Instagram account.

cnet.com

by | August 18, 2015 9:34 AM PDT

Drugs of the future

http://smallbiztrends.com/2015/08/3d-printing-drugs-spritam-aprecia-pharmaceuticals.html

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Could 3D Printers Manufacture the Drugs of the Future?

You can now use 3D printing to create items using a wide range of filaments, and not just plastics. Metals, edibles, bio and construction materials are just some of the examples that are being developed for 3D printing.

So it shouldn’t come as a surprise when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Spritam, an epilepsy medication made using 3D printers.

This makes Spritam the first 3D printed product approved by the FDA for use inside the human body.

The company that developed it, Aprecia Pharmaceuticals, used powder-liquid three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology, which was developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the late 1980s as a rapid-prototyping technique. Rapid prototyping is the same technique used in 3D printing.

According to the company, this specific process was expanded into tissue engineering and pharmaceutical use from 1993 to 2003.

After acquiring exclusive license to MIT’s 3DP process, Aprecia developed the ZipDose Technology platform. The medication delivery process allows high doses of up to 1,000 mg to rapidly disintegrate on contact with liquid. This is achieved by breaking the bonds that were created during the 3DP process.

If you advance the technology a decade or more, having the medication you need printed at home is not that implausible. While big-pharma may have something to say about it, new business opportunities will be created that will be able to monetize the technology.

As impressive as that sounds, there are many more medical applications in the pipeline.

The National Institute of Health (NIH) has a website with an extensive database of 3D printing applications in the medical field. This includes the NIH 3D Print Exchange special collection for prosthetics, which lets you print next generation prosthetics at a fraction of the cost of the ones now being sold in the marketplace.

The next evolution in the field of medicine is printing complex living tissues. Also known as bio-printing, the potential applications in regenerative medicine is incredible.

In conjunction with stem cell research, printing human organs is not as far-fetched as it sounds. Currently different body parts have been printed, and the days of long transplant waiting lists will eventually become a thing of the past.

It’s important to remember that a lot more goes into the creation of a medication or other medical break-through than just being able to “print” drugs. Other costs include intensive research and development and then exhaustive testing.

So there’s no reason to believe 3D printing alone will allow smaller drug firms to more effectively compete with huge pharmaceutical firms. But the break through will certainly create more opportunities in the medical industry for companies of all sizes.

Outside of medicine, 3D printing has been used to print cars, clothes and even guns, which goes to prove the only limitation of this technology is your imagination.

Many of the technologies we use today were developed many years ago, but they take some time before they are ready for the marketplace.

3D printing is one great example. It was invented in 1984, but its full potential is just now being realized.

In 2012, The Economist labeled this technology as, “The Third Industrial Revolution,” and that sentiment has been echoed by many since then. This has generated unrealistic expectations, even though it is evolving at an impressive rate.

smallbiztrends.com

by Michael Guta | Aug 10, 2015

30 printers to making a boat!

A Project of Epic Proportions: A Taiwanese Artist is Using 30 Printers to Print a 26-Foot Long Boat Consisting of 100,000 Parts

http://goo.gl/cHA549

The 2 meter long version of  Peng's boat

Over the past year, we have seen many incredible 3D printing projects take place. There have been houses, cars, boats, and prosthetic hands that have all been created on 3D printers. However, one artist, named Hung-Chih Peng, may have them all beat, at least when it comes to creativity and time involved.
The 2 meter version
Hung-Chih Peng is a Taiwanese artist who thinks outside of the box, and I’m not just talking about throwing in a few extra colors on a painting, or sculpting a slightly controversial scene. He has garnered a tremendous amount of attention with his unique exhibits such as Post-Inner Scripture in 2013, God Pound and 200 Years in 2009, and Little Danny in 2002, among others. Now Peng’s latest work is The Deluge – Noah’s Ark, which is currently an exhibition that can be seen at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum. It takes a model of a boat, and twists and turns its body in a way that isn’t physically possible in the real world.
But this is art, and The Deluge is Peng’s way of showing the inability that humans have exhibited in rectifying uncontrollable catastrophic challenges. Climate change, ecological crises, and environmental pollution are all changes that this planet is facing, yet seemingly humans do not have a way to correct these problems. The work is meant as a metaphor for showing the battle being waged by Mother Nature on the accelerated development of industrialized civilization. And as Peng explains:
“Human beings are unable to return to the unspoiled living environment of the past, and have become victims of their own endeavors. In the biblical time, Noah’s Ark is the last resort for humans to escape from the termination of the world. However, if Noah’s Ark sinks, where is the hope of the human race? If Noah’s Ark, a symbol of mankind salvation, becomes just as a shipwreck, human and nonhuman were placed in an equal position. Human subject is losing his predominance as the supreme center of the world.”
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Currently on display is this piece which Peng has created. It is 3D printed and measures 2 meters long. It depicts a time when the Anthropocene period (a period when human activities have/had significant global impact on Earth’s ecosystems), is replaced by the Mechanocene period when machinery begins taking over some of the jobs.
“It is certain that, no matter what circumstance will turn out, there will certainly be a disaster beforehand,” explains Peng. “Destruction and construction always grow and demise together. We will once again encounter the problem of moral degeneration.”
As part of the exhibition that features Peng’s 2 meter long “Noah’s Ark,” which has been twisted and turned in all directions, he has also turned his exhibition space into what he terms “an artist’s studio,” and is currently 3D printing a HUGE 26-foot-long model of the same boat, using 30 UP 2 FDM-based 3D printers. In all, there will be about 100,000 separate 3D printed pieces that will go into assembling this giant boat.
The 8 meter (26 foot) 3D printed boat - printed in 100,000 pieces.
“The boat is not finished yet, it will be finished at the beginning of Jan 2015,” Peng tells 3DPrint.com. “It will be 8 meters long and about 165 cm high and wide. We will use 560 kg of filaments, sponsored by UP printer maker, Beijing Tiertime. This is my first time using 3D printers. The original idea was only to build a huge twisted boat for this biennial. It has to be huge. After evaluating all the possibilities of different working processes, we think 3D printing is the best final decision.”
Visitors to the exhibit can see first hand as 30 3D printers are constantly working, printing different parts of the boat. When finished, they are assembled onto the larger model, which also is currently on display.
What do you think about this incredible art exhibit? Discuss in the 3D Printed 26 Foot Boat forum thread on 3DPB.com.
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3DPRINT.COM
by  | DECEMBER 19, 2014

3D printed iron man hand

This could very well be the coolest sounding prosthetic hand that you will have ever laid your eyes on (for now!)

There isn’t anything we can say that does it justice. The title says it all! 🙂

http://3dprint.com/19219/3d-printed-iron-man-hand/

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One of the up-and-coming technological advancements that we have seen, thanks to 3D printing, has been the huge influx of 3D printable prosthetic hands for children and adults in need. Traditionally, prosthetic hands have cost around $50,000, and typically are not available to children due to the fact that insurance companies refuse to pick up the tab on devices which a child will outgrow in less than two years. 3D printing allows for the creation and sharing of 3-dimensional design files, followed by the quick and very affordable fabrication of the designed object. The average 3D printed prosthetic hand costs under $50, and can be completely customized and fabricated in a single day.

Because the vast majority of these hands are made for children, we have seen several designers make some fun, creative designs targeted toward these youngsters. We’ve seen hands that light up, Wolverine hands, card-playing hands, and even commando style hands created for people of all ages and interests. All of these are 3D printed and made specifically to fit the person that they are printed for.

A little over a month ago, we heard about a 3D printed Iron Man prosthetic hand. It was printed in the colors of Iron Man and had a few additional features. With this said, a man named Pat Starace has taken the idea of creating an Iron Man themed prosthetic hand and made it, quite frankly, cooler than any prosthetic device that I have ever seen. Not only is Starace’s hand colored in the theme of Iron Man, but it actually incorporates much of the same technology and appearances that the superhero actually has on his hand.

“The hand is a container for all modern technology,” Starace tells 3DPrint.com. “It can incorporate microcontrollers, wireless devices, smart watches, sensors, accelerometers, NFC, RFID, and almost any technology. This hand is configured with an Arduino Microcontroller, Low Power Bluetooth, Lipo Battery, Lipo Charger, LED’s, and RGB LED’s. It can also be Voice Controlled.”

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Like the hand of Iron Man, Starace’s prosthetic incorporates a working laser, and working thruster (OK maybe it doesn’t actually thrust, but it looks cool). It has the option for adding a gyro, magnetometer, and more, as mentioned by Starace above. The shield is another key characteristic of the hand, and it houses cool weapons like the laser, which can be fired along side red LED lights that light up when the hand is tilted down. The thrusters are activated when tilting the hand back, like seen in the many Iron Man movies. Also when this happens, a ring light of bright RGB LED’s begin cycling through animated patterns.

“I had a vision that a 3D printed hand could be both functional and fun,” Starace tells us. “My main goal is to help a child that is going through life with a disability, and facing everyday challenges in their lives, by making them the COOLEST KID in their school. I can only think this will make a great impact on a child during their early years by raising their self-esteem to Super Hero Levels.”

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Unlike other prosthetic hands that we have seen created in the past, which utilized open source designs that are already out there, available for free, Starace designed his hand from the ground up. He started out by working from photographs that he found on the internet. He then started to model the hand in MAYA.

“I started modeling the palm and the fingers with polygons until I had the right shape. There’s a sort of organic mechanical shape to these parts, the goal was to replicate them as close as I could and retain the same look and feel. After I had the right shape in polygons it was time to import the model into Solidworks and start the mechanical design. Converting the polygons to a format that Solidworks could import, while still retaining the integrity of the model was going to be difficult. Knowing I’d be performing Solidworks procedure and features on the parts, it had to be done. I achieved this by creating an IGES Curve network on top my polygon model in MAYA.”

Assembling the Iron Man hand

All in all, it took Starace over 48 total hours of print time to fabricate the many different parts of the hand, including several iterations of some parts. He printed the parts on his Deezemaker Bukobot in ABS plastic. Once printing was complete, he had to remove all of the support material (there was a lot!). “It was with great excitement to see the model assembled and perform EXACTLY as I had designed it,” he tells us. “I can only attribute this to the over 20+ years I have creating animatronics. I added the electronics, switches, lights, and this brings to to where we’re at now… looking for a child to empower with Super Hero Powers.”

Without a doubt, this is the most interesting, interactive, fun, and mesmerizing prosthetic hand that I have ever seen. Starace thinks that it has a lot of potential, not only for cheering up kids with missing hands, but also for teaching them how to program the microcontrollers that operate the cool features of their device.

While Starace didn’t use any of the e-NABLE designs for his hand, he has recently joined up with the volunteer 3D printing prosthetic organization, and will be cooperating with them to bring the best open source prosthetic hands to those in need.  Starace currently makes himself available for all kinds of work.

What do you think about this incredibly feature rich prosthetic hand? Discuss in the 3D Printed Prosthetic Iron Man Hand forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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3DPRINT.COM
by  | OCTOBER 15, 2014