3D printed parts for a car

http://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/news/71751824/the-car-of-the-future-to-use-3d-printed-parts

Car parts could use 3D printing techniques in the future, according to BMW

The car of the future to use 3D printed parts

Car companies will soon make use of 3D printing to manufacture parts, bringing benefits in cost and strength that will improve the affordability and driving character of future vehicles, according to BMW’s head of lightweight design Florian Schek.

While most vehicle manufacturers use the advanced technology during the development and design phase to quickly create prototype parts or models, Schek believes it won’t be long before the technology is transferred into end-consumer production techniques.

He admitted that it is likely to be used on low-volume speciality vehicles first as the time needed to mass-produce parts by 3D printing is not as quick as conventional methods such as casting and forging for metals, or as affordable as plastics. But he said the rapid advances in the technology will ensure its future application is viable.

“We have that already in prototyping,” he told Drive.

“But there is definitely a future for it in mainstream production. It will come.

“I think it will take some time in high-volume production, but it is not that far away for specialist models like the i8. We can do some very interesting things with 3D printing that we cannot do with other methods and it is quite exciting about the benefits, both in terms of design and structure.”

Schek said the benefits of 3D printing structural elements – including major components such as shock absorber towers – could see improvements in weight reductions and rigidity, as the printing process could create components more intricately.

“With 3D printing we can see advantages in being able to build parts with strength where it is needed and not in places where it isn’t, and this will help improve decreasing weight. We can design the part according to the forces that are running through it, this will be a big step forward for some areas,” he told Drive during the launch of the all-new BMW 7-Series, which uses different materials in its skeleton – including steel, aluminium and carbon fibre – to reduce weight and increase overall strength.

“I can also see it eventually improving time to production in some circumstances too, because some components currently need to go through many processes to be ready for assembly whereas with 3D printing it is designed to be a finished product.”

stuff.co.nz

by ANDREW MACLEAN | 06:00, September 6 2015

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NEODiVR Environment-sensing VR System

http://3dprint.com/72131/awe-2015-occipital-neodivr-vr-headset-3d-printing-iphone-sensor/

images (1)

NEODiVR Environment-sensing VR System – 3D Printing, iPhone 6 & Structure Sensor Come Together

As the world of 3D printing evolves and revolves, it has developed kinships with other technologies that seem to function as symbiotic cousins. Both virtual and augmented reality fit right into that category, and not only are they parallel similar technologies, but they often employ 3D printing due to the affordability and flexibility involved in prototyping. With many iterations usually being required, for AR and VR, it’s usually very helpful to be able to create a new prototype on whim or at the last minute.

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And now, factoring 3D printing right into the final product, along with the iPhone 6,Occipital has announced today at the Augmented World Expo in Santa Clara (AWE 2015) that users can now create their own AR experience through the NEODiVR system with just four things:

  • Structure Sensor
  • 3D printed NEODiMOUNT case and matching NEODiVR conversion plate
  • HOMiDO VR headset
  • iPhone 6

While you can try this out if you are on hand today at the Expo, it’s easy to put together if you own the iPhone and a Structure Sensor. If so, all you will need extraneously is the HOMiDO VR headset and the ability to 3D print a custom attachment piece to create the system.

This is a spectacular AR gizmo that allows you to enter another world right from your living room or yard. Previously this technology was connected only to the iPad; with the inception of the iPhone 6, however, the entire setup is able to be transferred to the smartphone.

“You may remember that I’ve covered the previous version at CES of this device when we had it hooked up to a tablet,” says Michael Balzer of All Things 3D. “At that time I thought what a great idea if we could apply this to a headset, so I spent the last six months creating what I call NEODiVR.”

device

In the video you will find below, he shows off the 3D printed iPhone case that he designed, which is attached to the Structure Sensor, as he dons the headset, allowing him to experience VR and AR with six degrees of motion.

One puts on the headset and connects the Structure Sensor, which quite simply adds a depth sensor allowing every step you take in your living room to be recreated in the virtual world, whether you are crouching like a ninja or high-stepping it in pure unabashed fun.

“What they have done by attaching the sensor to the actual screen means they now are able to project the prime sensor feel or pattern and pick up the mesh information in real time of the objects around them,” says Balzer.”

This means you aren’t just going into the technology blindly either as physical objects are introduced into the VR world, eliminating the risk of tripping, embarrassment, and bodily injury.

view

It is a compact mobile device requiring no power source, and allows you to use 3D printing brackets to attach it to the iPhone or to an iPad with a Lightning connector. It allows your smartphone to understand the world in 3D.

The sensor is a hardware platform that works quite well on an iOS device, allowing you to:

  • Perform 3D mapping of indoor spaces, with measurements and ‘virtual redecoration’
  • Integrate AR games where virtual is completely connected to the physical world
  • Use body scanning during fitness tracking, as well as virtual clothes fitting
  • Play virtual reality games using 3D environments imported from the real world
  • Perform 3D object scanning just using the app, without hardware

Does this look like a VR/AR device you’d like to put together yourself and try out? Will you or were you on hand at AWE 2015 to check this out? Tell us about it in the Occipital’s NEODiVR AR/VR System forum over at 3DPB.com.

up close

3dprint.com

by  | JUNE 9, 2015

Separated of twins, joined at the butt thanks to 3D printing technology

http://3dprint.com/71548/conjoined-twins-butt-3d-print/

twins2

Twins, Joined at the Butt, Will be Separated Tomorrow Thanks to 3D Printing Technology

3D printing has been used to change the lives of many people over the past several years. Whether it is for lending a hand in the rapid prototyping of products, creating prosthetic hands for children with upper arm differences, or allowing surgeons to perform high risk surgeries with much more ease than ever before, the technology is certainly providing ample benefit to society.

Back in February, we reported on a complex surgery that was undertaken in Texas to separate conjoined twins. To complete the surgery, a detailed medical model was created to aid surgeons in the delicate operation. Now doctors in China are doing the same.

twins3

Tomorrow (June 9), will be a huge day for one family in China, as their beautiful newborn conjoined twin girls will be separated from each other for the first time in their lives. Born on March 17 in Nanjing County of South Fujian, China, the twins were found to be conjoined at the buttocks area. In fact, they share part of the same digestive tract and portions of their anus. Like most surgeries which involve the separation of conjoined twins, it is an extremely risky and difficult operation.

The girls have been transferred to the Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, where the surgery will take place tomorrow. Surgeons opted to wait until the girls were 3 months old and weighed approximately 10kg in order to perform the risky surgery. In studies, this has been shown to be the best time to perform such an invasive procedure, as babies tend to be strong enough at this point, and their bodies are ready to heal on their own.

These twins are in good hands though, as in the past 15 years, the Children’s Hospital of Fudan University has successfully separated 7 sets of conjoined twins. On top of this, using CT scan data, the surgeons were able to create an accurate 3D printed replica of the twins which doctors were able to simulate surgery on. They have used this 3D printed model to perform a mock operation, and in the process were able to revise their “real” surgical plan to make it more efficient and safe. While it is the very first time that 3D printing was used in order to aid in the separation of twins at this hospital, the hospital has used 3D printing in the past for other surgeries.

The surgery will include the separation of the twins, as well as reconstruction of their perineums and the rectums.  Currently the twins share a little less than 1cm of the same anus. It will certainly be a difficult surgery, but with the help of 3D printing, the surgical team feels very confident.

As far as the cost of the surgery, it is very expensive, but the family got a helping hand from the “Angel Mother” charity, in the amount of 200,000 yuan (approximately $32,231).

twins1

Best of luck to these beautiful twin girls as they undergo quite an extensive surgery tomorrow. What do you think about the use of 3D printing in creating medical models for complicated surgeries like this? Discuss in the Conjoined Twins forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3dprint.com

by  | JUNE 8, 2015

3D printed selfie!

The ‘Ultimate Selfie’ Made Possible!

http://goo.gl/ZCbcM2

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According to one 3D printing CEO, people are underestimating the potential demand for this product. Here’s why.

In the following video, 3D printing specialist Steve Heller interviews Conor MacCormack, CEO of Mcor Technologies, an Ireland-based 3D printing company that uses ordinary copy paper as the primary material in its printers, during EuroMold 2014, the world’s largest 3D printing conference, held in Frankfurt, Germany, in November.

The pair talk about the rise of the 3D-printed selfie and what it’ll take to reach critical mass. Ultimately, MacCormack believes Mcor’s suite of full-color 3D printers that have significantly lower operating costs — up to five times cheaper than the full-color competition — are well suited to drive the price of the 3D-printed selfie down to an attractive price point.

Steve Heller: We’ve seen a lot of these 3D-printed-selfie booths, if you will, around the EuroMold show. I know a lot of the technology uses a Z Corp technology, right, 3D Systems-based multi-material, full-color technology?

Conor MacCormack: Yes.

Heller: I was wondering if you could talk about the evolution of that. Is this the real deal? Right now, a 3D-printed selfie could be anywhere from $50 to $300, as you were saying earlier. Obviously, that price point needs to come down. You think that maybe Mcor could be a good fit for that.

MacCormack: Yes, I think people have underestimated — I don’t know how many people have said it to me here over the last two days. People have underestimated how big that [3D printed selfie] market is growing.

People thought it was a bit of a gimmicky idea. Who’s going to get a scan of themselves or whatever, and what will be the function of it? But they’re missing the point that if you can connect with somebody on an emotive level…

It’s something very strange about looking at yourself or someone that you know in a 3D printed sense. It’s a bit of fun, and that’s fine. It doesn’t all have to be part of a jet engine or something that goes into an aircraft. It’s fine to have something that’s a bit of fun.

When you look at these models here, something that’s pure white or something that’s full color, people are going to gravitate toward the full color, so the higher color quality is going to really only expand that market. I think that whole size of the industry is going to get really, really big.

If you look at, say, for example, photographs, the 2D photograph industry, I believe that’s a $200-$300 billion industry, and that industry is in a bit of a decline as maybe people are printing their images in different ways. That’s a real, real good opportunity for people in the 3D printing sense to actually tap into that.

I keep on calling these the “ultimate selfie.” When you turn on your Instagram instantly, the first thing it does is it’s pointing back at you — it’s not pointing out. We’re in that nation. We’re in that kind of era where people are taking scans of themselves and photographs of themselves, so I think people are underestimating the desire and the demand to print that.

When you want to get something that you’d have in your home or give to somebody as a gift, the two big things are price point and then the color quality.

If price point and color quality are the two big drivers in there, then we’re [Mcor is] very, very well, perfectly suited for that because running cost, as I said earlier we can be in full color maybe five times cheaper. Something that’s into that price range, something that’s $25, we’re $5. That’s the kind of things that we’re talking about. It’s big, big changes.

That means that people can set up businesses, people can become [3D printing service] bureaus. They can buy [3D printer] machines and they can offer the service. You will see this all over.

The [3D] scanners are becoming really, really small. You don’t need the big booths or a big investment, to get a big photo booth. You can get a scanner to fit over your iPad, you can use your mobile phone and scan people.

That’s getting better and better, literally on a month-per-month basis, and it’s all software-driven. It’s new algorithms that make the color matching better, make the geometry better, and then you’re going to be at the sweet spot where people will say, “Yes, that’s good enough quality. That’s the right price point for a gift. I’m not going to pay $300 for it, but I’ll pay maybe $30 for it.”

There is a number in there that actually will really accelerate it, and then it’s a case of can we make them fast enough, and how many machines are needed to tap into that massive market?

FOOL.COM
by Steve Heller, Fool Contributor | Feb 8, 2015 at 11:15AM

3 simply steps to get the ball rolling

Purchasing a 3D Print Couldn’t be ANY Easier. We Present to You *3 Alarmingly Simple Steps* to Get the Ball Rolling!

http://malta3dprinting.blogspot.com/…/3-incredibly-easy-ste…

Confused about how a 3D file becomes an object?

This short and sweet guide is tailor made to help you through the simple process of acquiring a 3D printed product from Malta 3D Printing. Anyone with a basic understanding of computers will be able to glide through these steps with ease.

1) Get a 3D File

Visit Thingiverse or Youmagine,two of the most popular databases jam-packed with 3D files, all available for free. Enter keywords into the search bar (such as ‘Batman’ or ‘Fishing lure’) and a number of results will pop up.

Imagine Star Wars IV is about to hit the theaters and you’d like an eye-catching collectable to take with you – go for a light saber or a Storm trooper helmet! Go wild, use your imagination!

If you feel swamped with choices or can’t find what you’re looking for, share your concept with us via Facebook and we’ll lend a hand.

If you’ve designed a file yourself, we’ll happily accept that too. Generally, we work with .STL and .OBJ file formats, but other file types are also acceptable.

2) Send us the 3D File or a Link to the File
The aforementioned databases (Thingiverse & YouMagine) allow anyone to download the 3D files required, so when you’ve found what you’d like feel free to send us the file/s via Facebook or e-mail.

Alternatively, you can just send us the link. After doing so, we can discuss customization options which include:

  • Size
  • Colour
  • Quality
  • Resolution
  • Material
  • Infill (density)

If you’re uncertain on any of the above, we’ll be happy to explain in further detail once you’re in contact with us.

3) Receive a Quote From us and Collect Your Product!
Once you’ve chosen the specifications (if any) for your file, we’ll quote you a price and if you’re happy with it, we can begin printing.

We can alter the product size or quality to match your budget, meaningyour favourite prints will always be affordable. Collect your product from our Birkirkara store or have it personally delivered to your doorstep.

MALTA3DPRINTING.BLOGSPOT.COM
by  | 12 December 2014