3D printed model of NASA’s rover

http://www.popsci.com/now-print-model-nasas-curiosity-rover-your-desk

Curiosity

3D-PRINT A MODEL OF NASA’S CURIOSITY ROVER FOR YOUR DESK

EXPLORE STRANGE NEW WORKSPACES

If you always wanted your very own Curiosity Rover, but couldn’t afford the $2.5 billion to build and launch your own, don’t worry: NASA has your back.

NASA recently released the plans to 3D-print your own mini Mars rover. It may not be able to fire lasers, send back amazing science and pictures, but it will look really cute on your desk.

Curiosity Plans

The British Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Smithsonian Institution have all made 3D models of artifacts from their collections available for printing. The National Institutes of Health is even in on the game, with biosciences-related models available for print.

But If you’re looking for more out-of-this world designs, check out NASA’s growing collection, which includes spacecraft classics like the Hubble Space Telescope and the Voyager probe, along with asteroids like Vesta, and of course, you can always print a wrench. Just like a real astronaut!

popsci.com

by Mary Beth Griggs | August 17, 2015

3D printed telescope

The University of Sheffield has released photos taken by a 3D-printed telescope, costing £100, which according to them has a quality rivaling conventional telescopes that cost 10 times as much!

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-south-yorkshire-29244429

Picture of the moon

A university has shown the first photographs taken by a £100 telescope built from parts made by a 3D printer.

The University of Sheffield researchers behind the project claim the image quality from the PiKon telescope compares to models costing 10 times as much.

Plans are available online allowing anyone to download and print the components needed to build the device.

The telescope’s images were unveiled as part of a science festival in the city.

It captured numerous pictures of the moon’s surface during its first use.

One of the Pikon’s developers, physicist Mark Wrigley, said he hoped the new telescope would be a “game changer”.

‘Democratising technology’

“We hope that one day this will be seen on a par with the famous Dobsonian ‘pavement’ telescopes, which allowed hobbyists to see into the night skies for the first time,” he said.

“This is all about democratising technology, making it cheap and readily available to the general public.”

At the heart of the telescope is the camera module of a Raspberry Pi, the cheap, barebones, British built computer.

Based on Isaac Newton’s reflecting telescope design, a concave mirror focuses an image directly onto the Pi camera sensor, which is mounted onto components created by 3D printing.

Other parts such as the lens and the mirror can be bought from online suppliers.

Because of the small size of the Raspberry Pi camera, it is possible to mount it directly in front of the mirror.

PiKon Telescope

The PiKon telescope has a magnification of times 160, which means that on a cloudless night it will allow detailed views of the moon’s surface, as well as galaxies, star clusters and some planets.

Mr Wrigley said that the designers would use public feedback to improve the telescope and develop new products.

Other events in the university’s Festival of the Mind, include a live musical performance by 150 musicians of Gustav Holst’s symphony The Planets in a pop-up planetarium and an interactive video game art gallery.

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