3D printed estate set

http://edition.cnn.com/2015/06/03/americas/architect-3d-prints-luxury-estate/

An artists rendering of a 3D-printed estate which is set to be built by architect Adam Kushner in conjunction with 3D-printing firm D-Shape.

The luxury 3D printed estate set to be made from sand, dust and gravel

(CNN)There’s already a 3D-printed house being built in the Netherlands. In China, 3D-printed mansions are reportedly on the rise.

Now, a 3D printed estate featuring a swimming pool, jacuzzi, car port and 2,400 square foot house could be coming to a sleepy plot of land in upstate New York.

The ambitious project is being undertaken by New York City architect Adam Kushner, alongside partners including 3D-printing pioneer Enrico Dini and his D-Shape firm.

Kushner told CNN that surveying has already begun with excavation work also set to commence soon.

The swimming pool and jacuzzi are penciled in to be completed by December 2015 while construction of the house is expected to continue until the end of 2017, he says.

An artists rendering of the pool house which will be 3D printed by D-Shape.

But the project hinges on getting the giant 3D printer, which will be used to produce the digitally designed building blocks of the estate on-site, into the country.

The device is currently in Italy after it was originally being built for a project partly funded by the Italian defense agencies. Military clearance is now required before the green light is given to export the printer to the United States, Dini says.

The delay in receiving this clearance is part of the reason the project has been held up since it was first announced back in August 2014.

“We are now waiting (for) permission to borrow the printer (from the military),” Dini says. “If I had another printer I’d send it there tomorrow, but unfortunately we don’t have and must wait.”

The litmus test

Whatever the import-export issues, Kushner says he sees the estate project as a test of D-Shape’s printer technology and its distinctive method.

This practice entails collecting sand, dust and gravel on site and mixing them with a magnesium-based binding agent to produce the 3D-printed building blocks required to piece the estate together. According to literature on the D-Shape website, the material produced by the printer is “similar to marble” in its constitution.

This technique is vastly different from other 3D-printing methods, Kushner says, and enables the production of many more “sculptural forms” that simply aren’t possible with other systems.

If D-Shape can prove its technology works and is efficient for a project of this size, Kushner believes it could lead to all manner of possibilities in architecture and construction. Not only could it be faster and safer than existing construction methods, he says, it could also end up being cheaper, more streamlined and of higher quality.

A Dini 3D printer like this one will be used to construct Adam Kushner's 3D printed estate in upstate New York.

And although the 3D-printed estate is something only the very wealthiest would be able to replicate, Kushner sees D-Shape’s construction methods benefiting the less fortunate as well.

“This will serve as a way of using our project to … pave the way for more humanitarian purposes that we see as the highest and best use for our technology,” he says.

“If we can build a simple pool house, I can print thousands of refugee housings. If I can build a pool, I can print underwater reefs (which he says D-Shape has already done before) to repair bridges, piers and infrastructures.”

A technology on the rise?

Integrating progressively more advanced 3D-printing methods into the construction industry has been a topic that has generated many eye-catching headlines in recent years.

The process of contour crafting — where large 3D printers are assembled on a building site (much like what will happen on Kushner’s estate) and programmed to construct pre-designed concrete structures and their relevant sub-components — was put forward by Dr. Behrokh Khoshnevis of the University of Southern California as far back as 2009.

Khoshnevis told industry website 3DPrint.com earlier this year that the first printers large enough for his version of contour crafting should become available within the next two years. He added that the method could even be used to build high-rise structures within ten years.

Chinese firm WinSun seemed to take inspiration from Khoshnevis’ methods when they claimed to have 3D printed a mansion and six-story tower block in the city of Suzhou, eastern China earlier this year.

Meanwhile, in the Netherlands, DUS Architects continue to piece together a 3D-printed house using its “KamerMaker” machine. Company co-founder Katherine De Wit described the DUS technique as being a potentially valuable tool that could be added to those already used to build homes.

An artists impression of the DUS Architects 3D printed house.

Other experts, however are more cautious about the immediate potential of 3D-printing technology in the construction industry.

In an interview with CNN in 2014, Dr. Phil Reeves, managing director of UK-based 3D-printing consultancy and research firm Econolyst, described 3D-printing a house on site like that planned by DUS as counter to existing building techniques which are already relatively efficient.

Then there are other fast-developing building methods like prefabricated construction which entails manufacturing components in a factory before transporting and rapidly piecing them together on a building site.

Chinese firm Broad Sustainable Building claimed to have used this method to piece together a 57-story skyscraper in just 19 days earlier this year.

For Kushner, however, the benefits of large-scale 3D-printing are many and will likely increase as the technology becomes more advanced.

“This is not superfluous, nor a lazy architects idyll,” he says. “I think it’s as important as the automobile was in changing the design of cities or how the printing press altered communication.”

“Why? Because it democratizes construction and architecture and puts it into everyone’s hands, just like the camera phone made everyone a photographer. Not everyone is good at it but everyone can become one.”

edition.cnn.com

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3D printed eggs used to study the art of deception among birds

http://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/6777/20150528/scientists-use-3d-printed-eggs-to-study-the-art-of-deception-among-birds.htm

Scientists Use 3D Printed Eggs to Study the Art of Deception among Birds

3D printing has already established itself within the scientific community. It’s been used to produce tools aboard the International Space Station, replicate body parts for surgical procedures, and now it’s found a new niche among biologists studying bird behavior. It turns out, 3D printers produce mighty fine eggs.

Animal behaviorists at Hunter College of the City University of New York are using 3D printers to produce eggs used in experiments that examine nesting behavior among birds. They’re particularly interested in brood parasites – birds that lay their eggs in other birds’ nests, for the behavior of such birds offers insight into the evolutionary arms race between species.

Successful brood parasites are well-adapted to their deceptive practice, laying eggs that resemble those whose nests they target for takeover. But the foster birds have evolved means of detecting such eggs, based on their size, shape, color, and pattern, and will cast them out of the nests when the interlopers are identified.

“Hosts of brood parasites vary widely in how they respond to parasitic eggs, and this raises lots of cool questions about egg mimicry, the visual system of birds, the ability to count, cognitive rules about similarity, and the biomechanics of picking things up,” says Prof. Don Dearborn, chair of the Biology Department at Bates College, a brood parasitism expert who was not involved in the 3D printing study.

Biologists have been studying brood parasitic behavior for decades, but it was always a challenge to produce realistic eggs for use in their experiments. They tried a variety of materials, such as wood and plaster, but the eggs were expensive and time consuming to produce and a challenge to reproduce consistently.

And that’s where the 3D printers come in.

The scientists from Hunter College used a 3D printer to produce model eggs based on those of the Brown-headed Cowbirds, a North American brood parasite. Some eggs were painted beige to match real cowbird eggs; other were painted blue-green to match eggs of the American robin, a typical target of cowbirds. They were able to fill the model eggs with water or gel, so that the eggs retained the weight and properties of real eggs.

Their experiments were a rousing success. The robins accepted 100% of the blue-green eggs while they rejected 79% of the beige eggs. Similar results were achieved using plaster eggs, but the 3D printed eggs are more consistent and easier to produce. And since they are based on digital models, it makes for easy sharing across scientific communities, which improves the reproducibility of experiments.

“For decades, tackling these questions has meant making your own fake eggs — something we all find to be slow, inexact, and frustrating,” says Dearborn. “This study uses 3D printing for a more nuanced and repeatable egg-making process, which in turn will allow more refined experiments on host-parasite coevolution. I’m also hopeful that this method can be extended to making thin-shelled, puncturable eggs, which would overcome another one of the constraints on these kinds of behavioral experiments.”

“3D printing technology is not just in our future – it has already revolutionized medical and basic sciences,” says Mark Hauber, an animal behaviorist at Hunter College and the study’s senior author. “Now it steps out into the world of wild birds, allowing standardized egg rejection experiments to be conducted throughout the world.”

sciencetimes.com

by May 28, 2015 11:29 PM EDT

3D printed movie and video game prop

http://gizmodo.com/i-stumbled-upon-a-3d-printed-movie-and-video-game-prop-1698250876

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

I Stumbled Upon a 3D Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Here at the Inside 3D Printing show in New York City, I stumbled upon a treasure trove of 3D-printed movie props, printed on standard consumer printers, and I never wanted to leave.

The creations come from My Mini Workshop in London, an intensive 10-week program for learning 3D printing, which just kicked off for the first time ever in NYC. I was annoying and bugged some innocent passersby to snap pictures and nabbed a few pictures of my own. These. Things. Are. Awesome.

Starlord Mask, The Guardians of the Galaxy

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Mjölnir, Thor and Avengers

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Type-25 Carbine (Spike Rifle), Halo Series

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Thorn, Destiny

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Ant-Man helmet, Ant-Man

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Isaac Clarke’s helmet, Deadspace Series

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

The Samaritan, Hellboy

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

Buster Sword, Final Fantasy VII and Covenant Carbine, Halo

I Stumbled Upon a 3D-Printed Movie and Video Game Prop Wonderland

NBD, just me holding one of the greatest weapons in video game history/fulfilling a childhood dream. By Luka Verigikj and Daniel Schunemann.

gizmodo.com

by Darren Orf | 4/16/15 4:07pm

MacklerMedia’s NYC Event

http://3dprint.com/58588/worlds-largest-pure-3d-printing-show-mecklermedias-nyc-event-is-huge/

meckler3

‘World’s Largest Pure 3D Printing Show’ – MacklerMedia’s NYC Event is HUGE

The city that never sleeps may just be on the verge of becoming the 3D printing capital of the world. This week, MecklerMedia launched their much anticipated 3D Print Week NY event, bringing companies and individuals from all around the globe to the Big Apple in what has be building up to be one of, if not the, largest 3D printing events in history.

The city-wide event, which launched Monday, April 13th with SOLS Martini Monday includes individual events being held by various companies within New York City, as well as MecklerMedia’s own Inside 3D Printing Conference and Expo, and their 3D Print Design and Fashion Shows which are taking place at the Javits Convention Center in Manhattan. As a co-producer of these MecklerMedia events, 3DPrint.com had a feeling that this year’s show would not only be one of the company’s largest 3D printing events ever, but that it could potentially become the world’s largest event moving forward.

mecklerfeaturedgood

“As of an hour ago (10:00 AM ET), [we’ve had] 11,100 pre-registered guests, with 53 countries represented [and] 44 U.S. states — Largest pure 3D printing show in terms of attendance worldwide.”

With all eyes on 3D printing this week, thanks to the Inside 3D Printing Conference as well as the 3D Print Design Show and 3D Print Fashion Show by MecklerMedia which officially kick off tomorrow morning, it is no surprise that most of the 3D printing stocks have been trading up considerably today. At the time this article was written, shares of Stratasys (NASDAQ:SSYS) were trading up an astounding 6.29%, while 3D Systems (NYSE: DDD) was up 6.06%, and Materialise (NASDAQ:MTLS) was trading up 2%. All three companies happen to have a huge presence at this year’s event, and the world seems to be taking notice.  Coincidence?  Probably not!

mecklerfeatured

With over 11,000 people who have pre-registered for the MecklerMedia events, this will certainly be one heck of a show, one which we at 3DPrint.com are excited to be a part of. It’s not too late to get tickets for the any of these shows, but hurry up because they are going fast.

meckler2

For those of you who do attend, be sure to stop by the 3DPrint.com booth, located in the 3D Printing Conference section, for a chance to meet some of our writers.

Will you be attending this event? Be sure to check in and discuss what you saw in the 3D Print Week NY forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3dprint.com

by  | APRIL 15, 2015

3D printed fashion shows

http://www.digitaltrends.com/features/inside-new-yorks-3d-print-fashion-show/

Melinda Looi + Materlise

Inside one of the first 3D printed fashion shows in America

“For me, fashion is an expression of art and I’m very excited to explore the technology’s potential to change how clothes are made and rst.”

How much would you pay for a pair of shoes customized to fit you perfectly? How about wearing your favorite piece of art? Welcome to 3D-printed fashion.

MecklerMedia will host its first 3D Print Fashion Show in the United States in New York April 16, showcasing the latest items from the top designers across the world. The company promises “the top 3D print designers from around the world will create original pieces” that will debut at the show. One of the show’s main attractions: Fashion designer Melinda Looi will reveal, what is eventually world’s first full-length evening gown, 3D-printed as a single part flexible enough to slink and vamp with a woman’s body.

“When you think of constructing with a sewing machine, you’re always thinking in terms of how to use fabric and thread,” Looi told Digital Trends. “But with 3D printing, you’re not limited to that.” Looi is a veteran designer, having won Designer of the Year three times at the Malaysian International Fashion Week. The enthusiastic designer will debut her second 3D collection in collaboration with the fashion show’s sponsor, 3D print software provider Materialise. Her first collaborative collection with Materialise — inspired by birds — came in 2013 at Malaysia’s first printed fashion show.

“3D printing will change the world,” Looi explains. “Maybe not now, but in times to come 3D printing will usher in a new era by enabling machines to produce objects of any shape, on the spot, and as needed.”

Francis Bitonti Studio + Michael Schmidt Studios + Shapeways

Indeed, 3D-printed clothing has caught fire among designers across the globe. Materalise and Looi put on Asia’s first two 3D print fashion shows in Malaysia andJapan, three months apart in 2013. The following year, Geek Picnic 2014 — an open-air festival held annually in St. Petersburg, Russia — showcased 3D print clothing alongside robot giants and virtual-reality headsets at the first 3D print fashion show in Russia. Later this year, Boston will host its first 3D printing jewelry competition courtesy of Design Museum Boston, New England’s only design museum. And 3D Printshow has held events for the advancements in the space since 2012; it held its first fashion show in New York City last year.

The future will strut its stuff on the catwalk, in other words — yet it’s still far from a reality today.

How soon is now?

Interest in 3D-printed clothing may be at its highest ever, but trucks full of printed clothing won’t flood your local H&M any time soon. Creating the future is taxing financially, with a single dress costing upwards of $3,000 just to produce at the moment.

“Currently accessories and garment accessories are the only commercial way forward, as a complete gown is just too expensive,” Looi said. And garments that come from the current generation of 3D printers lack the durability everyday clothing requires. “The fragility of a 3D printed garment is another thing to overcome,” she explained.

Looi chose not to reveal any details about her potentially groundbreaking collection, but promises it will be “even more spectacular then our last one.” Still, retail outlets are slow to adopt the groundbreaking tech, despite enthusiasm from designers. The acclaimed designer says no retail outlets have contacted her about selling her 3D-printed clothing yet, “but we do get a lot of inquiries from museum and exhibitors.” Emphasis on the yet: A spokesperson for MecklerMedia told Digital Trends the company has in fact received calls from retail chains interested in attending the show.

Other designers participating in the 3D Print Fashion Show have all had their hands in pushing this burgeoning industry. Andrew O’Mara helps 3D design custom footwear for startup Feetz, a company which turns photos of customer’s feet into individually customized 3D-printed shoes. Rachel Nhan, who has crafted 3D printed neckpieces, is assistant graphic designer at Aeropostale. Francis Bitonti runs a studio which produces 3D-printed jewelry, gowns, bags and accessories and describes itself as a “disruptive luxury brand.” Bitonti also holdswebinars on the 3D print process in fashion and is holding his next one on June 10 at 1 p.m. EST.

Rachel Nhan Neckpiece

For years, 3D print fashion has been on display. But Looi’s free-flowing gown could signal a path from the runway to your closet. With PayPal sponsoring this year’s Geek Picnic in Russia and Nike releasing its first 3D-printed Nike Football Rebento duffle bag, Mercurial FlyLite Guard and the Nike Vapor HyperAgility Cleat last summer, 3D print fashion may capture the funding needed to commercialize this revolution. It has certainly already captured the interest.

MecklerMedia’s inaugural 3D Print Fashion Show will take place April 16 at5:30pm at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City.

digitaltrends.com

by | April 7, 2015

 

3D printed garden !

Time to spruce up those boring city rooftops! 3D printed gardens are now becoming a thing of the present! 🙂

http://www.businessinsider.com/3d-print-plants-for-city-gre…

Patrick Blanc vertical garden

Too many city rooftops are barren, grey, and boring. Computer scientist Yuichiro Takeuchi, who works with the Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc. is out to change that.Takeuchi has found a way to print gardens filled with herbs and flowers. These gardens can then be planted on rooftops, or pretty much anywhere.

He uses a 3D printer and software that he designed to print yarn encasements that hold plant seeds that grow in to full-fledged plants in just a few weeks. His 3D printing technology can print gardens that conform to any shape you choose be it, triangular, rectangular, or even panda-shaped:

3d printing garden

The way Takeuchi’s method works is to first design your shape on a computer. Then you feed that design into the 3D printer, which prints yarn in the shape of your choosing.

Yuichiro Takeuchi, Sony Computer Science Laboratories3D printer prints felt in the shape you choose.

Once the 3D printer is finished, an attachment to the printer dispenses tiny seeds into the yarn.

Seed-dispenser attached to 3D printer releases seeds into felt.

Takeuchi’s approach hinges on a method called hydroponics where you grow plants with mineral nutrient material in place of soil. This is how some of those amazing vertical gardens are grown, like this one in France designed by French botanist Patrick Blanc.

Creations like the one above can run commissioners $1000 per square meter. Although it might be less expensive to build one yourself, it takes a lot of time and care. High prices and long hours of manual labor are the two factors that are hindering large-scale adoption and preventing greener cities, Takeuchi told Business Insider in an email interview. But 3D printing could be the key.

“The printing solution takes away much of those hurdles, and also provides a high degree of flexibility (one can print out a garden that fits snugly into any designated space) which hopefully will make hydroponic gardening more attractive for citizen living in dense cities with limited space,” said Takeuchi.

Takeuchi presented his ideas for a greener future last month at the Sony CSL symposium, at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

Right now, Takeuchi can grow relatively small plants, like watercress and herbs such as arugula and basil. Below is an image of one of the plants he grew in about one month:

3d printing plant

In the future, Takeuchi wants to print yarn encasements large enough to grow fruits, vegetables, and trees. His current 3D printer is too slow for that large a scale, but he’s spending the next year on building a bigger, faster printer.

3d print plant

Ultimately, Takeuchi envisions his city of residence, Tokyo, lush with blooming rooftops. Plants have proven to increase productivity in the office and they’re ability to suck up carbon dioxide and output oxygen is one way cities could help mitigate their carbon footprint.

Takeuchi is interested in transforming Tokyo rooftops for another special reason, however:

“Here in Japan we love fireflies (they have a special cultural significance), but as they can only thrive in pristine environments we don’t see them in dense, built-up Tokyo,” he said. “I’m hoping that by installing a number of printed gardens on rooftops and walls throughout Tokyo, I can someday bring back fireflies to my neighborhood.”

Below is a a before and after image of what Takeuchi hopes to achieve, which he presented at the Sony CSL symposium:

greenroofs 3d printing

Before and after comparison of what rooftops currently look like and what they could look like in the future.

BUSINESSINSIDER.COM
by  | Oct. 23, 2014, 3:18 PM

3D printed baby’s heart

Another medical marvel brought about by 3D printing! A two-week old infant’s life saved as a 3D printed replica of the baby’s heart was used to assist in complicated heart surgery! 🙂

http://www.independent.co.uk/…/3d-printed-heart-saves-babys…

Surgeons at a New York hospital have credited 3D printing with helping to save the life of a 2-week-old baby who required complicated heart surgery.

Surgeons at a New York hospital have credited 3D printing with helping to save the life of a 2-week-old baby who required complicated heart surgery.

Using MRI scan data, Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital in New York City 3D printed a copy of the child’s heart, which was both riddled with holes and structured unusually.

Surgery was going to be complicated and dangerous, but this 3D printed heart provided the surgeons the opportunity to study the organ, and develop a detailed surgery strategy.

“The baby’s heart had holes, which are not uncommon with CHD, but the heart chambers were also in an unusual formation, rather like a maze,” Dr Emile Bacha, who performed the surgery,told Connecticut local media.

“In the past we had to stop the heart and look inside to decide what to do. With this technique, it was like we had a road map to guide us. We were able to repair the baby’s heart with one operation.”

The project was funded by Matthew’s Hearts of Hope, a Connecticut –based foundation.

They have said that another 3D printed heart is in the making, with details to follow in the next month.

Marie Hatcher, the foundation’s founder, told The Independent:“This is a game changer for CHD babies with complicated heart anatomy.

Normally the first time the surgeon sees the heart is when the chest is open, now they have the ability to plan out the surgery ahead of time while looking at a 3 D Heart of the baby or child’s heart.”

This is yet another example of 3D printing coming to the fore of cutting-edge medical technology. Just the other day, Kentucky surgeon Erle Austin also credited 3D printing with improving the odds of succeeding in the most difficult surgeries, reports Wired.

“I’m using 3D printing to help me understand a complicated heart,” he told Maker Faire in Rome.

Like the team at Morgan Stanley, Austin had used the technology to inform his approach to heart surgery on a young child at Kosair Children’s Hospital.

“If I went in and did surgery, took off the front of the heart and did irreparable damage, the child would not survive.”

Using an experimental version of the Makerbot Replicator 2, Austin printed a copy of the heart in three parts.

He said: “Because I have an identical reconstruction I can take off the front of the heart and see inside of it and make a plan as to how I’m going to direct the flow of blood and move the obstruction in the heart.”

INDEPENDENT.CO.UK

by ZACHARY DAVIES BOREN | 06 October 2014

3D printing – further progress in medicine

Another good deed achieved through 3D printing!

http://www.nydailynews.com/…/chinese-doctors-3d-printing-re…

CHNOUT

A 46-year-old farmer identified only as Hu suffered a head injured when he fell from the third floor of a building. Doctors recently rebuilt the missing section of his skull with titanium mesh produced by a 3D printer.

They will rebuild him: a staff member at a hospital in Xi’ an, Shaanxi province, displays the titanium mesh produced by a 3D printer prior to the man’s surgery.

A Chinese man recently underwent a potentially life-changing operation thanks to something created by a 3D printer.

Doctors at a hospital in Xi’an, Shaanxi province, used a 3D-printed titanium mesh implant to rebuild a section of Hu’s skull.

The 46-year-old farmer suffered a head injury in October when he fell from the third floor of a building, according to local media. A large portion of his skull was crushed and needed to be removed.

Since the accident, Hu has also had trouble with his vision and speech.

Doctors said they hoped the titanium mesh would help recreate the original shape of his skull and reduce surgery trauma.

NYDAILYNEWS.COM
by  | August 29, 2014, 5:11 PM

Entirely 3D printed estate

3D printed houses have already become old news!

Check out this newly started 3D printed project! An entire estate; swimming pool (with pool house, of course), and a 4 bedroom house.

All 3D printed.

New York City architect/contractor Adam Kushner begins construction of the first ever 3D printed estate, which features a 3D printed swimming pool, 4-bedroom, 2400 square foot home, and more.  The 3D printer which will be a modified version of Enrico Dini’s D-shape printer, will, if all goes as planned, eventually be able to automatically place rebar within the 3D printed house, as it prints.

We have covered a lot of news concerning the 3D printing of houses, over the course of the last year or so. Whether it was the 3D printed castle that Andrey Rudenko has constructed in Minnesota, the 3D printed salt house that Emerging Objects has built, or one of the many other projects that have been taking place around the globe, the technology is only making small waves among the construction industry.

None of these projects come close to that, which well known New York City Architect and Contractor Adam Kushner, and partners James Wolff, and Enrico Dini have planned and already have begun to undertake in Gardiner, New York. Kushner, who runs KUSHNER Studios and In House Group in New York City, has over 25 years of experience in the construction industry. His company has designed and constructed buildings in Manhattan as large as 80,000 square feet in size, and he, as well as his company, has been featured on shows such as Fox News, BBC Home, and Celebrity House Hunting.

“About a year and a half ago, I started to become immersed in 3D printing,” Adam Kushner told 3DPrint.com. “I said, ‘OK, who’s doing this on the construction level?’  That is where I see the future. I don’t care about the toys or the games or the little things people are doing on their desktops. What I really saw, was the bigger potential for 3D printers in the construction industry. That is a trillion dollar business, and it changes the paradigm of how we build.”

Kushner found a man named Enrico Dini, who is quite well known in his own right, for the invention of his extremely large 3D printer, capable of printing out large structures and buildings. Dini owns and operates a company called D-Shape, as well as a patent for a magnesium-based binding process that the 3D printer uses.  The process combines sand or other materials with a magnesium-based binder to create stone-like objects.

Kushner told Dini that he wanted to bring his 3D printers, and the process in which they print with, to America, in hopes of using them for a few truly unique construction projects. Dini informed Kushner that he had been talking with a man named James Wolff about opening a potential business for D-Shape in America. Kushner contacted Wolff, the two hit it off, and to make a long story short, they decided to create D-Shape Enterprises New York.  Wolff, is the co-founder of Deep Space Industries, which won two major NASA contracts for the asteroid mission and now has an office at Ames.

Just this past June, Kushner flew over to Italy to meet with Dini. The two agreed to ship one of these large 3D printers back to New York, and it is scheduled to arrive in January of 2015. From there, Kushner, Wolff and their team of workers plan to begin 3D printing what will undoubtedly be the single most amazing 3D printing project ever undertaken. Surprisingly, Kushner has no doubts that he will successfully accomplish it.

“There are people who design. There are people that build. There are people that design and build,” said Kushner. “Rarely do the two come together.  And although Design-Build firms certainly exist, we have the rare niche in that we are designers who are very good at building, as opposed to contractors that happen to have an architect on staff.” This is where Kushner believes he has an advantage over all of the other projects that have been attempted, and to varying degrees, succeeded or failed.

The massive project that KUSHNER Studios will be undertaking, is for the 3D printing of an entire estate in Gardiner, New York. It will feature an in-ground swimming pool, a pool house, and a 2400 square foot, 4 bedroom home. If accomplished, like Kushner undoubtedly believes, it will go down in history as perhaps the most innovative project that brought 3D printing into mainstream construction – which if successful it undoubtedly will do.

Master Site Plan (click to enlarge)

“It could be ego driven, it could be legacy driven, but if I am going to leave the world anything, I’m hoping that perhaps this might be my little niche,” Kushner told us.

Surely one would wonder, how in the world a project this large, and this unique would be permitted for building in New York, with the lack of history that 3D printing has in the construction industry. Surprisingly, it has already been permitted, and it was actually a relatively simple process. “There was a form I had to fill out, and it asked for ‘method of construction’,” explained Kushner.

On the application, there were 3 options; wood, steel, and masonry. Kushner created his own forth option called “3D Printed”, and checked it. He sent it into the city department of buildings, and he was granted a permit. When the inspector came out to see the site and the site plans, he didn’t bat an eye.

Construction on the site has begun, with power being dropped in last week, and the electricity on the site should be live within a week or so, as of when this article was published. Once they receive the 3D printer from Dini, they plan to begin printing the in-ground swimming pool, which will be the easier task of what Kushner sees as a 3 stage process. Stage 1 will be the pool, stage 2 – the pool house, and stage 3 – the 2400 square foot house. While using Dini’s 3D printer, he plans to modify and “tinker with it” to increase its efficiency and printing ability, so that by the time they are ready to print the full-size house, it will be a completely overhauled 3D printer, capable of doing some quite amazing things.

Laying down the power for the building site.

When Kushner went to visit Dini in Italy, he was shown the very first machine that the inventor had come up with, about 11 years ago. It is actually still in use today. “It was like looking at Thomas Edison’s wax cylinder (phonograph),” Kushner told us. “Then I went back to Pisa, and I saw what he is working on now, and for me this was like looking at a Victrola (phonograph). ”  Kushner continued his analogy by saying, “I know that what he is going to be sending us, is going to be more like a high fidelity stereo of the 1960’s. It will work, it will do the job, but there is a long way to go to bring it into the iPod era. I’m hoping that I’m going to get this high fidelity stereo version, and we are going to work on it. I’m hoping to get it to the iPod version in about a year to a year and a half.”

Starting on the swimming pool in late February or early March will give Kushner and the rest of his team the ability to make the needed tweaks and changes while undertaking a project that has already been proven to work with Dini’s 3D printer. “A pool is in complete compression,” explained Kushner. “Water on the inside, soil on the outside. One of the most successful uses of the D-Shape technology has been in the creation of artificial reefs.”

The material used for printing, will all be locally sourced. Kushner plans on taking local rock from his building site, crushing it up and then combining a bonding agent to make the material needed for the 3D printing process. As they are 3D printing the pool, Kushner fully expects that he will be modifying the 3D printer to improve upon it. Then, they will move onto stage 2 – 3D printing the fully enclosed pool house sometime next summer. The pool house will feature some additional challenges, including a roof that will be 3D printed, as well as additional tensile forces on the structure.

One of Enrico Dini's large 3D printers, similar to the one that Kushner will be using and modifying. (image source: d-shape)

To overcome some of these issues, Kushner has several ideas which he plans to potentially use. They include the possibility of adding fiber, aluminum strands, or even Brillo pad-like steel shavings into the concrete mixture in order to add tensile strength to the printed structure.

Stage 3 – the 3D printing of the 2400 square foot house, which Kushner hopes to start in about 14 months from now, will be the most challenging. He sees this stage as where most of the major breakthroughs in the 3D printing technology will take place. Up until now, with previous ‘3D printed house’ projects, we have only seen very small houses actually 3D printed, or in some cases, small sections which have been assembled together. Kushner plans on blowing away all of these projects by completely 3D printing a full-size home. To do so, he plans on using ideas that have only previously been dreamt of, or in some cases unimagined altogether.

Pool Detail Plans (click to enlarge)

“My main focus is trying to figure out a way to get rebar installed into the mix as it is being poured (printed),” Kushner told us. This is where he feels the technology will really turn heads, and make people realize that this is the future of construction. “So what would it take to have an extruding reel that shoots through this continuous rod (of rebar), and cuts it at whatever moment (desired)? Not too much,” he continued.  “Technology is here now. There are machines that are automated to bend rebar. I think that’s what I bring to the picture, in that there aren’t too many architects and contractors who have worked in this medium, who understand concrete, rebar, and how to cut and bend it, and that field winnows down quite a bit when you throw in the number people who have worked in 3D technologies.”

If you look at the building plans included in this article, you will see that everything is constructed in slices. “I’ve taken the dimensions of the machine at the moment, which is 5m x 5m x 5m,” said Kushner. “I’m breaking [the construction] down into container sized units, so nothing is going to be larger at this moment than 10 meters by 5 meters, and that becomes the basic building block for all of these 3D printed pieces.”

Estate plans (click to enlarge)

Kushner and D-Shape are currently working on the STL files for the development of the estate; the same type of file used for desktop 3D printers. In fact, they plan on printing a small scaled version on a desktop 3D printer at some point, hopefully in the next week or so, prior to beginning the large full-scale version on-site.

As for costs of construction, that is yet to be seen, but Kushner expects that it will be far less than traditional construction methods, due to the fact that 45% of normal construction costs are usually attributed to labor.  With 3D printing, labor costs are virtually ‘0’, besides the individual(s) needed to operate the 3D printer.

Kushner, 51 years old, sees the project as a 2-year endeavor; one which he is taking very seriously. “This is serious for me. I don’t play games any more. Time is shorter, and this is something that I’d like to do with my days. If successful Kushner, Wolff, Dini, D-Shape, and team will go down in history as the first to use 3D printing on a massive scale within the construction industry.  It may very well change the paradigm within the construction industry.

You can view the architecture plans provided to 3DPrint.com by Kushner here.  What do you think about these incredible plans by Adam Kushner, and D-shape Enterprises New York?  Will he succeed?  What does it mean for the future of construction?  Discuss in the 3D Printed Estate forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3DPRINT.COM
by  | AUGUST 20, 2014