Injured toucan

http://www.cnet.com/news/injured-toucan-gets-new-beak-courtesy-of-3d-printing/

Injured toucan gets beak repair courtesy of 3D printing

A custom prosthetic beak-piece helps a toucan rescued from animal smugglers eat and groom normally once again.

3D printing isn’t just for people to make tchotchkes, buildings and Kraken dice. There’s a whole realm of the 3D-printing world involved with helping out animals who need a leg (Derby the dog), face (Akut-3 the turtle) or foot (Ozzie the goose). We can now welcome Tieta the toucan to their ranks.

Tieta was rescued in Brazil from an illegal animal seller. Half of her upper beak was missing. If you’ve ever seen a toucan, you know how magnificent their beaks are. Those bills are also practical in the wild, helping the birds reach for food and regulate their body temperature.

Tieta got a 3D-printed plastic prosthesis in late July to repair her bill. The process of creating the prosthesis was intensive. Designers used a taxidermy toucan as a model and several prototypes were printed. The lightweight final design received a coat of nontoxic varnish and a castor-oil-based polymer for durability. Collaborators on the project included wildlife preservation group Instituto Vida Livre and the Federal University of Rio de Janiero.

It took Tieta three days to adjust to the repaired appendage, but she is now able to eat normally. “We were feeding her fruit and she was ignoring the new beak. But when we gave her live animals, like maggots and cockroaches, she ate normally immediately,” Instituto Vida Livre director Roched Seba told BBC News.

It’s not known how Tieta lost part of her bill. It could have been an accident in the wild or through mistreatment by wildlife smugglers. The bird will spend the rest of her life in the safety of an animal sanctuary.

cnet.com

by | August 25, 20153:32 PM PDT

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3D printed prosthetics for Ugandan schoolchildren

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150603-3d-printed-prosthetics-get-ugandan-amputees-back-on-their-feet.html

3D printed prosthetics get Ugandan schoolchildren back on their feet

Although we’ve heard numerous stories about how 3D printing has helped enable hundreds of those in need of prosthetic limbs, a majority of the cases have been located in the United States or the United Kingdom where 3D printers or 3D printing providers are becoming increasingly common and access to a 3D printer is getting easier than ever before.  While this is excellent news, there are still many world locations where affordable prosthetic devices – and even 3d printers in general – are needed and could be used perhaps even more than those located in more developed Western countries.

In the meantime – thankfully – various organizations and 3D printing providers have been picking up 3D printing jobs as needed to ensure that those who need the prosthetic devices the most are getting the proper care that they need.  More recently, the University of Toronto and charity Christian Blind Mission took it upon themselves to produce prostheses for a Ugandan schoolboy who had been in need of a prosthetic device for years.

The schoolboy, Jesse Ayebazibwe of Kisubi, Uganda, tragically had his right leg amputated after he was hit by a truck after walking home from school three years ago.  Since then, the nine-year-old has been maneuvering with the aid of crutches – however they have since made it difficult to play or move around.  “I liked playing like a normal kid before the accident,” he said.

Thanks to the support of a local orthopaedic technologist, Moses Kaweesa of the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services (CoRSU) in Uganda, Ayebazibwe was able to use an infrared scanner and some 3D modeling software to create a prosthetic solution for the young boy before shipping the files to Canada to be 3D printed.

“The process is quite short, that’s the beauty of the 3D printers,” said Kaweesa.  “Jesse was here yesterday, today he’s being fitted.”

While Ayebazibwe previously wore a traditional-style prosthesis last year, his new 3D printed prosthesis is among the first in a trial that could see more 3D printed prosthetic device across Uganda for others in need – thanks in no small part to the efforts of Kaweesa.

Currently, the entire country of Uganda has just 12 trained prosthetic technicians for over 250,000 children who have lost limbs, which are often due to fires or congenital diseases.  At $12,000, a portable solution consisting of a laptop, a 3d scanner and a 3d printer is not cheap – however when considering the impact that a portable prosthetic device system could have on over 200,000 children in need – in northern Uganda alone, many people have lost limbs due to decades of war where chopping off limbs was a common reality.

“There’s no support from the government for disabled people … we have a disability department and a minister for disabled people, but they don’t do anything,” said Kaweesa.  “You can travel with your laptop and scanner.”

Upon receiving his 3D printed prosthetic, Ayebazibwe was clearly ecstatic.  “(It) felt good, like my normal leg,” he said. “I can do anything now — run and play football.”

The boy’s 53-year old grandmother, Florence Akoth, looks after him, even carrying him the two kilometers to school after his leg was crushed and his life shattered. She too is thrilled.

“Now he’s liked at school, plays, does work, collects firewood and water,” said Akoth.

3ders.org

by Simon | Jun 3, 2015

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150603-3d-printed-prosthetics-get-ugandan-amputees-back-on-their-feet.html

First 3D printed prosthetic legs to Ugandans

The World’s First-Ever Fully Functional 3D Printed Leg Socket is Now Being Replicated in Uganda

http://goo.gl/p8N05t

Ruth Nakaye (right) is the first person in the world to receive a fully functional prosthetic leg with a socket created using 3D printing technology. The first step in the creation process involves scanning the residual limb, as Moses Kaweesa (left) is doing here.

Researchers provide world’s first functional 3D printed prosthetic legs to Ugandans.

Canadian researchers and a 3D printer are making medical history in Uganda.

The Canadian team from the University of Toronto recently helped a young Ugandan woman walk with the world’s first functional 3D-printedprosthetic leg socket, the critical customized element that is the main component of an artificial limb.

“It makes me feel proud … it’s prestigious,” says Ruth Nakaye, the 20-year-old from Kampala who received the team’s first prosthesis.

During a five-day visit to Kampala in January, the researchers used a 3D printer to make sockets, the customized part of a prosthesis that attaches to an individual’s body and forms to the thigh for those with amputations below the knee. They then connected the sockets to the standard pylons and feet that the Red Cross provides for prosthetics in developing countries to complete the replacement limbs.

Matt Ratto

MattRatto, a Toronto professor and principal investigator for the project, says he believes this combination is the world’s first3D-printedleg to be used outside laboratories and test environments.

The Canadian researchers are working with Christian Blind Mission Canada (CBM) and Ugandan prosthetists to make limb replacements more affordable and help alleviate the shortage of technicians in developing countries.

3D printing technology has a number of benefits, the team says. It makes the production of prosthetic limbs more efficient, saving time and money for the patient, which is particularly important in places like Uganda where many people have very limited incomes.

It also allows the small number of Ugandan prosthetists to handle more cases than they could with the time-consuming manual plaster method, says Ratto.

Affordable prostheses

Nakaye, who was born without her full left leg, says she was excited to wear her new 3D-printed prosthesis home. Prosthetics have allowed her to play sports and attend school. Nakaye missed two years of primary education because she lacked mobility until a charity paid for her first artificial limb, she says.

3D printer

Unfortunately, Nakaye’s story is not uncommon in her country.

The majority of those with physical disabilities can’t accessprosthetics because of the cost, saysDolorenceWere, executive director of the Uganda Society for Disabled Children.

It’s difficult for many Ugandans – 38 per cent of whom live on less than $1.25 US a day – to pay at least $300, excluding hospital fees and travel expenses, for a prosthesis, says Mitchell Wilkie, CBM’s director of international programs.

Children also grow an average of 2 centimetres a year, and generally need a new prosthesis every six months or so. Patients and their family often need to spend a week at a hospital and make recurrent visits to get fitted for a new prosthesis. But in Uganda, where 86 per cent of the population survives on subsistence farming, many locals can’t afford to pay for prostheses or take time away from their fields, says Wilkie.

Roseline Cheptoo, 4, also received a 3D-printed prosthesis from the Canadian researchers. It was her third week-long visit for prosthetic fittings, and her family travelled more than seven hours from Amudatdistrict in northern Uganda to reach the hospital in the capital city.

“Our parents don’t have jobs – they grow corn and peanuts and sell any surplus at markets,” says her brother, Sailas Akodumoi, 19. “I’m not sure how my family will afford to pay for future prosthetic legs after the charity ends her sponsorship this year.”

Skills shortage

The main issue for Ugandans, however, isn’t the cost of prosthetics or hospital services, Ratto says. It’s access to skilled people who can fit them.

Moses Kaweesa

“You could make [prosthetics ]

zero dollars and you’d still have the same issue; there are too few prosthetic technicians in developing countries.”

Studying to become an accredited prosthetist or orthopedic technologist who can make prostheticstakes at least three years, says MosesKaweesa, who studied the skill at Makerere University in Kampala.

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that in the developing world, there’s a shortfall of 40,000 prosthetic technicians. It adds that it would take 50 years to train just another 18,000, according to a 2003 study.

There are approximately 12 prosthetic technicians in Uganda, according to CBM. And there are about 10 facilities where prosthetics can be made in the country, adds Malcolm Simpson, chief executive officer of the project’s partner hospital.

This is where 3D printers could help.

Currently, it takes three to six days to use plaster to create a negative cast of a residual limb, fill it and mould a prosthesis, explains AbdullahIssa, a local prosthetist. Adjustments are often needed, meaning more manual work.

Roseline Cheptoo

“The 3D technology we’ve introduced in Uganda cuts this work down to as little as six hours,” saysRatto.

It takes just a few minutes to do a 3D scan of a residual limb and use software to shape the prosthesis. Then the printer takes a few hours to produce the customized socket from the scan.

The time saved compared to traditional methods of producing a socket will allow prosthetiststo see five to six times more patients a week,Ratto says.

It also adds precision, says Issa, who has been working with the technology since January. “You can make exact adjustments, rather than guessing like we do with the manual method.”

The time-saving technology is also affordable enough that it can be used by facilities in developing countries.

“The consumer-grade 3D printers that we’re using cost $2,000 and $6,000 – and the software, MeshMixer, is free,” explains Ratto.

The Ugandan project will continue over the next six months as the Toronto researchers study the comfort and durability of the 3D-printedsockets, he says.

And he adds that the project should benefit patients in Canada as well.

“It isn’t so much a developed-world technology being redeployed to a developing world context, it’s exactly the reverse,” says Ratto. “Everything we’re learning through this project can be used in developed countries to help produce prosthetics more efficiently and affordably for Canadians too, and that’s what’s interesting.”

CBC.CA
by Julia Burpee, CBC News | Feb 16, 2015 5:00 AM ET

3D printed prosthetic leg

This Lucky Sheep is Now Proudly Strutting its Stuff With a Printed Prosthetic Leg!

http://3dprint.com/42969/sheep-3d-print-prosthetic-leg/

pets-and-animals-sacntuary

It’s back to Woodstock, and today we aren’t headed down to Yasgur’s farm, but rather to Jenny Brown and Doug Abel’s Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary. These are some lucky farm animals indeed, who despite challenges earlier in their lives, are now cherished and nurtured deep in the Catskill Mountains where peace, love, and happiness made history decades ago. Still working in that vein, WFAS extends peace, love, and respect to animals as well — including good medical care.

Founded in 2004, Brown and Abel began at the farm with a picturesque wedding and fundraiser that paid for the pasture and barn for the sanctuary. Beginning with a group of rescued chickens and a rooster, today they provide shelter to hundreds of animals in need, including goats, sheep, ducks, cows, turkeys, and many more.

Photo by Bob Esposito

Not only do these animals come into the comfort of WFAS, off the streets or out of factory farms, but they find a place to heal as well.

One such very lucky sheep at the farm is Felix, who arrived at WFAS six years ago, missing a leg and stealing the hearts of everyone lucky to have the chance to get to know him.

Felix is also a rare breed of sheep, called a Katahdin. These sheep are very unusual in that they are known as ‘hair sheep.’  As they do not grow wool, they are meant only for purposes of grazing and as a meat source.

As the wee little lamb arrived on the farm lacking complete locomotion, they had him fitted for a prosthetic leg but over the years it had begun to wear down and he was starting to favor the limb.

Brown was involved in exploring a new device for the sheep last year, as co-founder of Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center (HVAMC) at SUNY New Paltz, Sean Eldridge toured the farm and began discussing an exciting new way they could fit Felix with a replacement prosthetic.

“I was introducing (Eldridge) to Felix and telling him that he really needed a new leg, as you could see he was hobbling on it,” said Brown.

enhanced-1460-1412721105-17

Eldridge brought up the possibility of 3D printing a prosthetic for Felix, sparking the idea for Brown, who was off and running with the project to set one very lucky sheep up with a new leg.

The 3D printed prosthetic did come about as a result of her discussing the issue at hand and possible technology available with her own prosthetist who, as is to be expected, had a client base composed of only humans — until Brown brought him Felix and they began the journey to see what was entailed in 3D printed prosthetics.

“A great relationship is budding in the world of 3D prosthetics,” stated Brown, who wears a prosthetic leg herself due to childhood cancer.

With everyone on board with taking on the challenge of finding a way to 3D print Felix a new limb, they sought the advice of Andrea Looney, a veterinarian atCornell University. Katherine Wilson, assistant director of the HVAMC, used a cast scanned by biology major Karen Bylott to build his 3D printed prosthetic after a number of fittings, which they produced out of AVS Plus — which is also used to make LEGOs.

“He’ll get to live his full life out here,” says Brown. “We’re all about making sure these lucky animals have the best lives imaginable.”

While some of the animals are eventually adopted, many stay at the farm for life, and surely this is an amazing atmosphere that most humans would revere as well.

While we write many articles about the amazing ways 3D printed prosthetics are enriching and changing people’s lives — and those of so many needy children — it’s a pleasure and an honor to write about our hairy (not woolly, mind you!) four-legged friends who have the right to a higher quality of life as well, and are receiving it through the creative and persistent efforts of those like Brown, who are open to — and seek — innovation.

Do you know any animals — or humans — who have received 3D printed prosthetics? How do you think this will affect the lives of more domesticated animals and pets? Tell us your thoughts in the Sheep’s 3D Printed Prosthetic Leg Forum over at 3DPB.com.

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3DPRINT.COM
by  | FEBRUARY 7, 2015

New 3D printed legs for a dog

Animal Lovers Rejoice! This Adorable Dog Can Walk Again Thanks to 3D Printing.

http://goo.gl/UxM8lj

Another day, another animal given a new lease on life thanks to 3D printing. This time it’s Derby, a dog born with deformed legs who, with the help of some folks at3DSystems, now runs alongside his owners with gleeful abandon. Derby’s front legs have been augmented with two blade-like attachments that Who’s-a-Good-Boy uses to run and scamper.

Derby was placed into a foster home by The Peace And Paws Rescue and ended up with a 3DSystems employee, Tara Anderson. Two designers and Derrick Campana, an animal orthotist, scanned Derby’s legs and made cradles and blades that fit him perfectly.

While this footage, like the footage of 3D-printed ducks before it, is designed primarily to melt our poor widdle hearts, it’s wonderful to see a dog so happy and all thanks to rapid prototyping. While these sorts of things were possible for decades, the work required to sculpt legs like these was prohibitive, especially for an animal. Now, however, you could feasibly design these once and scale them up and down for various animals, inviting in the Age of the Bionic Hamster or the Era of the Cyber-Ermine. Or, simply, the Hour of Sweet, Lovable Derby.

“This is what 3D printing is all about,” said Anderson. “To be able to help anybody – a dog, a person – to have a better life? There’s just no better thing to be involved in.”

TECHCRUNCH.COM
by  | Dec 16, 2014

First 3D printed knee for cat!

Cyrano the cat gets a second chance to be able to use a leg deteriorated from bone cancer again, with the help of the first 3D printed knee joint ever made for cats! 🙂

http://www.engineering.com/…/3D-Printing-Creates-the-Worlds…

3D printing, medicine, cat, surgery

A Weighty Dilemma

It’s the kind of diagnosis you dread. When Cyrano developed bone cancer in his left hind leg, his owners wanted to get him the best treatment possible to bring him back to full health. After successful radiation treatment that eliminated the tumour, Cyrano went into full remission. Unfortunately, because of the invasive nature of the cancer, Cyrano was left with bone deterioration in his distal femur and he was unable to use his painful knee joint. In cases like this, surgeons normally choose to amputate the affected limb; however, at 26 lbs, Cyrano wouldn’t be able to support his weight with only three legs. Undeterred, Cyrano’s owners enlisted the help of experienced veterinary surgeon and orthopaedic specialist Dr Denis Marcellin-Little and his long-time collaborator Ola Harrysson, Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering at North Carolina State University to create a custom solution for their beloved pet.

Getting Cyrano Back on His Feet

3D printing, medicine, cat, surgery

Dr Marcellin-Little and Prof Harrysson have worked with Materialise using Additive Manufacturing in surgeries for over 10 years. With amputation out of consideration, they felt that 3D Printing could provide an ideal solution for Cyrano because of its ability to create small but detailed parts to exacting specifications. Cyrano would thus become one of the very first cats to receive a miniature, limb-sparing total knee arthroplasty. Starting with CT scans of both hind legs, Dr Marcellin-Little and Prof Harrysson used Materialise’s Mimics Innovation Suite to generate accurate 3D models of Cyrano’s leg. Adapting the design of a knee implant used in dogs, in collaboration with BioMedtrix, an animal implant company, they then created a miniature implant that fit to the exact anatomical structure of Cyrano’s leg, and the surgical plan needed to successfully realize the procedure. Because of the small size of the bones, the integrated ability of the Mimics Innovation Suite to engineer parts on a personalised anatomical model facilitated a process that would have otherwise been extremely difficult to manage and perform accurately.

Building Strength and Integration Features Into Implants

Knowing the bone structure around the joint was weak, the implant was designed with stems that would anchor it into the bones. Materialise technology partner EOS then printed the implant using cobalt chromium, a metal strong enough to support Cyrano’s weight and the wear and tear that daily use would exert on the thin parts. Building the implant by Direct Metal Laser Sintering meant that mesh and porous areas that would promote integration of the implant into the bone could also be built into the piece as it was being created. These features, only achievable using Additive Manufacturing, provide enhanced long-term stability over traditional implants, giving surgeons a new option for non-standard cases such as Cyrano’s that can be tailored exactly to their needs. Since his surgery Cyrano has returned to his family, and although he now walks with a limp, he can move freely again with full use of his joint. With 3D Printing now entering the veterinary realm, cats are one step closer to experiencing their full nine lives.

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