NEODiVR Environment-sensing VR System

http://3dprint.com/72131/awe-2015-occipital-neodivr-vr-headset-3d-printing-iphone-sensor/

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NEODiVR Environment-sensing VR System – 3D Printing, iPhone 6 & Structure Sensor Come Together

As the world of 3D printing evolves and revolves, it has developed kinships with other technologies that seem to function as symbiotic cousins. Both virtual and augmented reality fit right into that category, and not only are they parallel similar technologies, but they often employ 3D printing due to the affordability and flexibility involved in prototyping. With many iterations usually being required, for AR and VR, it’s usually very helpful to be able to create a new prototype on whim or at the last minute.

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And now, factoring 3D printing right into the final product, along with the iPhone 6,Occipital has announced today at the Augmented World Expo in Santa Clara (AWE 2015) that users can now create their own AR experience through the NEODiVR system with just four things:

  • Structure Sensor
  • 3D printed NEODiMOUNT case and matching NEODiVR conversion plate
  • HOMiDO VR headset
  • iPhone 6

While you can try this out if you are on hand today at the Expo, it’s easy to put together if you own the iPhone and a Structure Sensor. If so, all you will need extraneously is the HOMiDO VR headset and the ability to 3D print a custom attachment piece to create the system.

This is a spectacular AR gizmo that allows you to enter another world right from your living room or yard. Previously this technology was connected only to the iPad; with the inception of the iPhone 6, however, the entire setup is able to be transferred to the smartphone.

“You may remember that I’ve covered the previous version at CES of this device when we had it hooked up to a tablet,” says Michael Balzer of All Things 3D. “At that time I thought what a great idea if we could apply this to a headset, so I spent the last six months creating what I call NEODiVR.”

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In the video you will find below, he shows off the 3D printed iPhone case that he designed, which is attached to the Structure Sensor, as he dons the headset, allowing him to experience VR and AR with six degrees of motion.

One puts on the headset and connects the Structure Sensor, which quite simply adds a depth sensor allowing every step you take in your living room to be recreated in the virtual world, whether you are crouching like a ninja or high-stepping it in pure unabashed fun.

“What they have done by attaching the sensor to the actual screen means they now are able to project the prime sensor feel or pattern and pick up the mesh information in real time of the objects around them,” says Balzer.”

This means you aren’t just going into the technology blindly either as physical objects are introduced into the VR world, eliminating the risk of tripping, embarrassment, and bodily injury.

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It is a compact mobile device requiring no power source, and allows you to use 3D printing brackets to attach it to the iPhone or to an iPad with a Lightning connector. It allows your smartphone to understand the world in 3D.

The sensor is a hardware platform that works quite well on an iOS device, allowing you to:

  • Perform 3D mapping of indoor spaces, with measurements and ‘virtual redecoration’
  • Integrate AR games where virtual is completely connected to the physical world
  • Use body scanning during fitness tracking, as well as virtual clothes fitting
  • Play virtual reality games using 3D environments imported from the real world
  • Perform 3D object scanning just using the app, without hardware

Does this look like a VR/AR device you’d like to put together yourself and try out? Will you or were you on hand at AWE 2015 to check this out? Tell us about it in the Occipital’s NEODiVR AR/VR System forum over at 3DPB.com.

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3dprint.com

by  | JUNE 9, 2015

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3D Printed RayGun Shoots 7 Rubber Bands!

http://3dprint.com/62498/3d-printed-rubber-band-raygun/

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This 3D Printed RayGun Shoots 7 Rubber Bands in Quick Succession

Creativity is endless when a skilled 3D artist is provided with a 3D printer, allowing him/her to turn their virtual models into tangible, real life products. The technology has brought to life some incredible inventions and innovations which have greatly enhanced the lives of others. At the same time, 3D printing has also allowed for these creative minds to have a little fun in fabricating things that would have only been dreamt of a few years ago.

For one freelance 3D artist, named Aiman Akhtar, who specializes in modeling characters, 3D printing allowed him to create a toy gun unlike anything we’ve seen before. Akhtar, who writes a monthly column for 3D World Magazine on the topic of 3D printing, seems to thoroughly enjoy the challenges that come with designing new products.

“Every month, I challenge myself to print something I have no clue how to make, then figure it out and take the readers on the journey with me. In the past months I’ve created an iPhone case, bobbleheads, fully articulated characters, 3D printed trophies, eyewear, and am currently tackling jewelry and wearables,” Akhtar tells 3DPrint.com.

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When you think of 3D printing, there are a ton of designs out there for objects that are cool to look at, but only a small percentage of the objects out there are actually functional. One of Akhtar’s latest projects was for something that not only is fully functional, but something that is a ton of fun to play with as well. He designed and 3D printed a rubber band raygun.

“I recently moved to Los Angeles and decided to visit the Rose Bowl Flea Market which takes place bi-weekly in Pasadena,” Akhtar told us. “There, on display, I saw some hand made, wooden, rubber band shooters and instantly knew I had to make my own custom 3D printed version. That’s the great thing about 3D printing, inspiration can come from anywhere and it’s the fastest way to go from an idea to a prototype. I took the toy apart that night and started redesigning it for 3D print.”

To design the gun, Akhtar searched around the internet for photo references of other raygun designs. He then used Photoshop to sketch out his various ideas. Once he had come up with an idea that satisfied him, he used ZBrush to sculpt the shape what he needed, before exporting it as an OBJ file into MODO to start building its functional parts. After all of the parts were designed, the models were brought back into ZBrush to key them all together, before exporting each part out as a separate STL file.

raygun2

In all, there were 21 separate pieces that needed to be 3D printed, including the trigger, hammer, barrel, sights, grip, internal keys, and more. Akhtar tells us that he could have easily 3D printed it in just five or six parts, and even perhaps as a single object, but he had a desire to make it as colorful as he could. Breaking it down into many individual pieces allowed him to do so.

Surprisingly, Akhtar doesn’t own a 3D printer himself. Instead, for this project, he used 3D Hubs to find an affordable printing service close to his home.

“I landed upon a small buiness called Cybertech, and submitted an order though 3D Hubs to their print lead, Israel Pena,” Akhtar tells us. “I gave clear specifications and color notes on how I wanted each part printed, and Israel took care of the rest. He used a MakerBot 5th generation, switching out the various color plastic spools as specified.”

After receiving the parts back, Akhtar put them together but found that the trigger was not flexible enough. It was too weak to stop the hammer, and upon trying to fire the gun, it snapped off. He quickly redesigned the trigger, and just as quickly had the new design printed out by Cybertech. He tells us that it “worked brilliantly” after receiving and assembling the revised trigger. It can shoot up to 7 rubber bands in quick succession, and it is one of the most beautiful toy guns you will ever see.

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The complete detailed tutorial on making this gun can be found in 3D World Magazine, issue 194, which can be purchased through iTunes or ordered as a physical copy through MyFavouriteMagazines. What do you think about this incredible design? Discuss in the 3D Printed Rubber Band Raygun forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3dprint.com

by  | MAY 5, 2015

3D printed gadgets for iPhone 6

Only for iPhone 6 users!

New phones, new gear. We bring you 3D printed gadgets for the latest iPhone, including speakers and portable charging docks!

http://malta3dprinting.blogspot.com/…/09/iphone-6-special.h…

iPhone6 3200mah Charger with USB Power Out 3d printed Accessories Music

In light of Apple’s latest record-breaking smartphone, Malta 3D Printing has selected a number of useful printables to enhance the iPhone experience.

Early purchasers may have been left with a sour taste in their mouth due to some unforeseen problems, but our selection of unique products will help turn their frowns upside down.

This stylish iPhone 6 charger is sure to save your blushes in a sticky situation – remember that time you accidentally deserted your date, only because your iPhone ran out of battery? What about that time you got lost in the woods searching for your camping buddies?

This versatile gadget annihilates any chance of those awkward situations becoming reality.

Not only does it charge your iPhone faster than a regular charger, it also extends the battery life. Gone are the days when our trusty cellphone batteries would last a couple of days in the red zone. In 2014, low-battery means it’s time to panic!

Using Wi-Fi, 3G, or an application (practically any smartphone function) drains the battery like crazy.

Simply slot your brand new iPhone 6 or 6 Plus into the case and voila.

For the energy conscious customer, a solar-powered version is also available, helping you bring your electricity bill down.  The electronics required are simple to attach to the case, but a full-kit version with no assembly is also available.

If you’re looking for something simpler, this standard iPhone dock will do the job.

There’s nothing unique or special about it, but sometimes simplicity is all you need. On that note, 3D printing marketplaces are now jam-packed with different iPhone 6 cases. Some are quite stylish, like this steampunk case, and others quite basic.

While you’re still buzzing from the familiar smell of a freshly opened iPhone, savor the moment by blasting your favourite tunes. Should Apple’s sound hardware not provide you with the kick you needed, try a set of 3D printed enhancement speakers.

This model by Thingiverse user Datheus is sure to turn a quiet night in with friends into a thumping house party. All that’s required is for users to place their smartphones into the device and prepare for the onslaught of noise complaints.

iPhone users on the go will be tired of fumbling around whilst driving in search of their trusty smartphone – a recipe for disaster. Imagine dodging traffic as it rings away in your bag or pocket, only for you to have missed the call by the time you’ve fished it out.

Debuting on Thingiverse only two days ago, this simple case protects the iPhone and allows drivers to safely answer calls without too much attention diverted from the road.

It’s also been modified to accommodate for charging.

Only released a few weeks ago now, the list of 3D printable enhancement products for the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus is still relatively small – but having smashed all previous iPhone and smartphone sales records, we can expect the list to grow quickly.
MALTA3DPRINTING.BLOGSPOT.COM
by  | 29 September 2014

3D printing used by Fujikon

Fujikon is using 3D printing for its headphones, in order to gain that competitive edge in the market!

http://3dprint.com/13233/fujikon-headphones-3d-print/

fujikon-case-image-web

As iPhones, iPads, galaxy phones, androids, and the multitude of other mobile devices continue to multiply, the market for accessories becomes a place for razor-sharp competition. Known as peripherals, things such as headsets have found a booming, high tech marketplace where the differences are measured in incredibly fine units. Much as Olympic athletes have come to compete for thousandths of the second advantages in order to win, so must these peripherals companies compete in order to survive.

The award-winning headphone manufacturer Fujikon has found itself pushing hard to hold onto its leading edge. In 2011 the company decided to redirect the focus and update the practices of its 200-member research and development team to bring them in line with the advantages offered through modern technologies. The company, based in Hong Kong, prides itself on its ability to maneuver through the field of innovations in its area of specialization: headsets and speakers. They continually strive to push the envelope in order to be at the forefront of advances in noise cancellation, wireless connectivity, and overall sound quality.

As such, they began to investigate the possibilities offered by  new technologies in 3D printing. Over a period of a year and a half their research and development team closely examined the number of 3D printing systems based on characteristics of build platform size, precision, surface finish quality, and material properties. They wanted to determine if it would be possible to produce high quality products quickly and efficiently using the latest 3D printing technology.

ProJet7000SD-Angle

After a great deal of in-depth investigation, it was determined that the Projet 7000 was the only machine available that matched all of their specifications. By May 2013, the machine had been installed and staff had been trained for its use. Company spokesman Wu Chunxiang described the fit:

“As soon as we started, we could see and experience the stability of the Projet 7000. This was perfect die-less manufacturing: we produced accurate samples with arbitrary and complex geometry that we would not have considered before. The Projet 7000 instantly started to help our customers, our engineers. We could think up a new idea, and within a day could evaluate the design, perform validation and verification of the parts and assemblies, conduct acoustic testing, review packaging design, and reduce the risks associated with producing tooling for the new products. Before, the same process would have taken a longer time.”

Fujikon is already realizing the benefits of their choice to embrace the cutting edge of 3D printing. The savings that are estimated for the first year are approximately 5% of total production development time and a minimum of 11% material savings. In addition, when compared with the older 3D printing machines the company previously used, the production of 3D parts is now over 60% faster.

“With the competitive market environment, and increasing manpower costs, we have to find ways to be better at what we do. The Projet 7000 is allowing us to meet demand and compete in the market. We complete product development effectively and efficiently, and we are excited to see how 3D printing from 3D Systems will improve our competitive edge as we go forward.”

Such adoption will likely spur competitors who are not already using this type of technology to now consider it. Let’s hear your thoughts on Fujikon’s use of 3D printing in the Fujikon printing forum thread on 3DPB.com.

parts-fujikon-web

3DPRINT.COM
by  | AUGUST 29, 2014