3D printing with light

http://3dprint.com/89024/calarts-3d-printing-with-light/

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CalArts Student Experiments with 3D Printing Light

Not all 3D printing is meant to last. When CalArts student Aaron Bothman decided to print something for his short film The Red Witch, his thesis project, he wanted it to be less permanent. Having seen the work of Beijing-based artist Ekaggrat Singh Kalsi, who has used a modified 3D printer to ‘print’ in light, he found his inspiration.

Not something that you can pick up with your hands, the product of this technique is something that can be captured on film, which is exactly the medium in which Bothman works.

He and his father worked together on building the printer, a small delta model constructed from a kit but with a particular twist. When assembled, an LED was placed where the hot end would usually have been installed. This allows Bothman to capture the light on film by using a long exposure while the printer runs the model, tracing out the shapes as a 3D light painting.

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This isn’t the first 3D printing project that Bothman junior and Bothman senior have worked on together. In an interview with 3DPrint.com, Aaron talked about his experience printing with his father and how it has influenced his work both while at CalArts and after graduation:

“I’m an animator and artist based in Los Angeles. I graduated from the animation program at CalArts a couple months ago, and am currently working as an artist at JibJab, a small studio in LA. I originally learned about 3D printing in middle school from my dad, who teaches mechanical engineering at UCSB, and who helped a lot in thinking through this project. As a stop-motion filmmaker, 3D printing allows me to tackle more ambitious projects on a short production schedule than I might be able to otherwise.”

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In order to create the light animation, each Maya image to be captured is sent to the printer one frame at a time. Over time, these images create the illusion of movement, just as is done in more traditional stop motion filming. The result is a piece that is built up in layers, requiring the same mode of conceptualization as a 3D printing project but with the option for movement and, of course, no support materials. In fact, no materials at all, something that makes this a particularly appealing way to engage in a 3D printed project if there is no need for the product to be tangible.

Somewhat akin to the old question about a tree falling in the forest with no one to hear it, the question that could be asked of this technique could be: when a 3D printer creates something that cannot be touched, is it still 3D printing? The creations don’t truly occupy space or at least they only do for a fleeting moment but as they dance before your eyes, I think you may be willing to set that debate aside for a moment. Just think of it this way: with this technique, you could print all you want and never run up a bill for filament and never have to worry about storage space.

And that sounds pretty ideal to me.

Let us know what you think about this concept in the 3D Printing with Light forum thread at 3DPB.com.

3dprint.com

by  | AUGUST 15, 2015

3D printed fashion shows

http://www.digitaltrends.com/features/inside-new-yorks-3d-print-fashion-show/

Melinda Looi + Materlise

Inside one of the first 3D printed fashion shows in America

“For me, fashion is an expression of art and I’m very excited to explore the technology’s potential to change how clothes are made and rst.”

How much would you pay for a pair of shoes customized to fit you perfectly? How about wearing your favorite piece of art? Welcome to 3D-printed fashion.

MecklerMedia will host its first 3D Print Fashion Show in the United States in New York April 16, showcasing the latest items from the top designers across the world. The company promises “the top 3D print designers from around the world will create original pieces” that will debut at the show. One of the show’s main attractions: Fashion designer Melinda Looi will reveal, what is eventually world’s first full-length evening gown, 3D-printed as a single part flexible enough to slink and vamp with a woman’s body.

“When you think of constructing with a sewing machine, you’re always thinking in terms of how to use fabric and thread,” Looi told Digital Trends. “But with 3D printing, you’re not limited to that.” Looi is a veteran designer, having won Designer of the Year three times at the Malaysian International Fashion Week. The enthusiastic designer will debut her second 3D collection in collaboration with the fashion show’s sponsor, 3D print software provider Materialise. Her first collaborative collection with Materialise — inspired by birds — came in 2013 at Malaysia’s first printed fashion show.

“3D printing will change the world,” Looi explains. “Maybe not now, but in times to come 3D printing will usher in a new era by enabling machines to produce objects of any shape, on the spot, and as needed.”

Francis Bitonti Studio + Michael Schmidt Studios + Shapeways

Indeed, 3D-printed clothing has caught fire among designers across the globe. Materalise and Looi put on Asia’s first two 3D print fashion shows in Malaysia andJapan, three months apart in 2013. The following year, Geek Picnic 2014 — an open-air festival held annually in St. Petersburg, Russia — showcased 3D print clothing alongside robot giants and virtual-reality headsets at the first 3D print fashion show in Russia. Later this year, Boston will host its first 3D printing jewelry competition courtesy of Design Museum Boston, New England’s only design museum. And 3D Printshow has held events for the advancements in the space since 2012; it held its first fashion show in New York City last year.

The future will strut its stuff on the catwalk, in other words — yet it’s still far from a reality today.

How soon is now?

Interest in 3D-printed clothing may be at its highest ever, but trucks full of printed clothing won’t flood your local H&M any time soon. Creating the future is taxing financially, with a single dress costing upwards of $3,000 just to produce at the moment.

“Currently accessories and garment accessories are the only commercial way forward, as a complete gown is just too expensive,” Looi said. And garments that come from the current generation of 3D printers lack the durability everyday clothing requires. “The fragility of a 3D printed garment is another thing to overcome,” she explained.

Looi chose not to reveal any details about her potentially groundbreaking collection, but promises it will be “even more spectacular then our last one.” Still, retail outlets are slow to adopt the groundbreaking tech, despite enthusiasm from designers. The acclaimed designer says no retail outlets have contacted her about selling her 3D-printed clothing yet, “but we do get a lot of inquiries from museum and exhibitors.” Emphasis on the yet: A spokesperson for MecklerMedia told Digital Trends the company has in fact received calls from retail chains interested in attending the show.

Other designers participating in the 3D Print Fashion Show have all had their hands in pushing this burgeoning industry. Andrew O’Mara helps 3D design custom footwear for startup Feetz, a company which turns photos of customer’s feet into individually customized 3D-printed shoes. Rachel Nhan, who has crafted 3D printed neckpieces, is assistant graphic designer at Aeropostale. Francis Bitonti runs a studio which produces 3D-printed jewelry, gowns, bags and accessories and describes itself as a “disruptive luxury brand.” Bitonti also holdswebinars on the 3D print process in fashion and is holding his next one on June 10 at 1 p.m. EST.

Rachel Nhan Neckpiece

For years, 3D print fashion has been on display. But Looi’s free-flowing gown could signal a path from the runway to your closet. With PayPal sponsoring this year’s Geek Picnic in Russia and Nike releasing its first 3D-printed Nike Football Rebento duffle bag, Mercurial FlyLite Guard and the Nike Vapor HyperAgility Cleat last summer, 3D print fashion may capture the funding needed to commercialize this revolution. It has certainly already captured the interest.

MecklerMedia’s inaugural 3D Print Fashion Show will take place April 16 at5:30pm at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City.

digitaltrends.com

by | April 7, 2015

 

3D printed shoes for Miss America

Miss Georgia becomes the first Miss America hopeful to wear 3D printed shoes to the competition, putting wearable 3D printed flair on the map for such competitions!

http://www.cnet.com/…/miss-georgias-custom-heels-flaunt-3d…/

Shoes that look like a classic car? Georgia Tech industrial design students fashion a pair of high-tech shoes for their peer, Miss Georgia, inspired by the school’s Ford mascot.

3D-printed shoes have, until now, mostly been the stuff of art exhibits and fashion shows presaging a world in which we all look like we’re wearing alien life forms.

On Saturday, shoes molded by 3D printing got a far wider showing, parading along New Jersey’s Atlantic City boardwalk on the feet of Miss Georgia, Maggie Bridges.

At the traditional “Show Us Your Shoes” procession — where Miss America hopefuls wear fancy footwear honoring their home state — Bridges sported a pair of custom-engineered wedges inspired by the Ramblin’ Wreck, the 1930 Ford Model A Sport coupe that serves as student body mascot at Georgia Tech, where Bridges is a senior.

Georgia Tech industrial design students Maren Sonne, Jordan Thomas, and Julia Brooks fashioned the sparkly shoes, which feature a finely detailed laser-cut grille with 3D-printed headlights; a laser-cut black and gold pattern on the heels; and little 3D-printed wheels, complete with tread details, along the sides.

The trio originally considered designing a shoe that said science with every step. “We were looking at DNA strands and beakers used in chemistry and stuff,” Sonne says in a video about the design process. In the end, they opted for a distinctly recognizable Georgia Tech icon, the Ramblin’ Wreck.

It took the trio about four weeks and $400 to transform the $60 Moda wedges into wearable retro sports cars. The iconic white side bumpers proved the biggest challenge, Sonne told Crave.

“We could only bend them in the x/y axis so we had to make sure they fit the shoes prior to heating up the acrylic,” she said. “We made a template out of paper and fit it to the shoe (which took about 10 different templates) we then cut it out of acrylic and heated the material to fit it to the shoes.”

Bridges didn’t win the Miss America pageant Sunday — the title went to Miss New York. But she definitely walked away with one glittery prize — the first pair of Miss America shoes to feature 3D printing. “Maggie absolutely loved them,” Sonne reported, an observation echoed by Bridge, who wrote on a Facebook fan page that the students “knocked this out of the park” and created a “work of art.”

CNET.COM
by | September 15, 2014 3:10 PM PDT