3D printed smart food?

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/science/3d-printing-set-to-transform-how-you-prepare-dinner-1.2291374

Nanotechnology, already in widespread use in healthcare, has numerous possible applications in farming and food production. Photograph: Getty Images

3D printing set to transform how you prepare dinner

Technological advances ‘crucial’ to halving food waste across Europe by 2025.

“Smart food” that could be 3D-printed at home and even tell you when it goes spoiled will be possible in the not-too-distant future, according to agriculture and food development authority Teagasc.

“It’s already possible to make milk and meat in a lab and to 3D-print burgers and pizzas, so it’s conceivable that even geographical location could become completely flexible, with people 3D-printing their own food at home if they want to,” said Dr Lance O’Brien, head of strategy and international relations.

Nanotechnology, already in widespread use in healthcare, has numerous possible applications in farming and food production.

Maeve Henchion, head of agri-food business and spatial analysis at Teagasc, described some of the possibilities, including “smart packaging”, with nanosensors to alert you if food has reached its use-by date or is spoiled. The sensors could also identify contamination at the point of packaging to stop bacteria reaching the food supply chain.

“There are calls to halve food waste across Europe by 2025, and technological advances will be crucial if we are to achieve that,” said Aoibheann O’Brien, co-founder of social enterprise Foodcloud. “Each household wastes about €700 of food per year, and the Environmental Protection Agency estimates 60 per cent of that is avoidable.

“If nanotechnology can be used to empower people about when food is okay to use in a more sensitive way, that would be hugely welcome.”

These developments are so close that Teagasc is encouraging Irish people to engage in debate about technology in agri-food industries.

“In the wake of the genetically modified food controversy, debates need to be led by what consumers want from agri-food technology and what’s acceptable to them”, said Dr O’Brien, adding: “In a short number of years we will see huge changes in these industries and we need to be looking ahead.”

Teagasc has launched a foresight exercise looking at technologies that have the potential to seriously impact on the Irish agri-food sector in the next two decades, he explained.

Over 200 international scientists are currently involved and the group will shortly seek public submissions on the area.

An international conference planned for March 2016 will focus on identifying what the public wants from advances such as nanotechnology, biotechnology and digital technology in agriculture and food production.

irishtimes.com

by Martha Finnegan | Mon, Jul 20, 2015, 20:01

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Candy mechanics uses 3D printing

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150720-candy-mechanics-uses-3d-printing-to-turn-selfies-into-edible-candy.html

Candy Mechanics uses 3D printing to turn selfies into edible candy

The 3D printing of food is one of the most exciting and amusing developments within the world of additive manufacturing, but hasn’t been able to recreate very detailed designs. Now a new British startup has put an unusual spin the production process to achieve a much higher quality. Called Candy Mechanics, they use 3D scanners and 3D printed molds to turn selfies into edible lollypops made in an impressive six different flavors. If anything, it really proves how much fun you can have with desktop technology and a creative mind.

The project in question is called Heads on Sticks, that has just completed a very successful six week trial at Selfridges London. Startup Candy Mechanics was founded by Sam Part and Ben Redford out of a love for fun and ridiculously awesome stuff. These two modern-day Willy Wonkas were fortunate enough to get on board with Makerversity, a pioneering making community established in 2013. They specialize in bringing innovative designers together with workshops, materials, tools and the environment necessary to develop a startup. Makerversity set the two makers up with a workshop in the iconic Selfridges London for six weeks, where they pioneered these fascinating edible lollypops with the help of customers from the streets and Selfridges’ staff members.

The final products are then made through a remarkably simple process. First, scans of customers are made, which are used to make 3D printed mini busts. These are then used to make molds, which can be filled with chocolate or any flavor you prefer. ‘In all seriousness though, there’s some incredible tech out there at the moment and we feel like it’s a great time to apply some of that tech to the world of candy. We’re not just about lollipops, we want to push the boundaries of how people think and interact with candy in all its forms,’ they say in an interview with Makerversity.

This process was developed during their trial at Selfridges. ‘We had six weeks to develop a product from scratch all the way through to retail,’ they wrote on their blog. ‘It was like christmas morning breaking open brand spanking new machines and all the tools we needed to get started.’ Their goal? To develop a kit that can be used to make your own chocolate heads. ‘In the kit we put a 3D print of you, chocolate, sticks, instructions & a custom made mould of your very own head,’ they add. This six weeks trial turned out to be an amazing prototyping period at one of the busiest shopping areas in Britain, enabling them to develop a fantastic product and get a lot of feedback.

This process has now prepared them for a production run of their six favorite flavors, all made with their custom production process. ‘Using 3D scanners, 3D Printers and 3D humans beings (you), we have developed a process that makes your face scrumptious, no matter what you look like,’ they write. The available flavors are: chocolate, raspberry and pistachio, banana and salted peanut, raspberry and black sesame seeds, salted corn and chocolate crumb, peanut and chocolate crumb.

And why lollipops? ‘Two reasons. A: We think everyone has always wanted to lick their own (or someone else’s) face. B: We also think that at some point, everyone has wanted someone else’s head on a stick. We’re just providing the means to do it – call us a public service,’ the duo explains.

But in all seriousness, cofounder Ben Redford explained what an impact 3D printers can make on original and small scale manufacturing. ‘3D printers have massively reduced the time to get from an idea to something that resembles a good working prototype. They’ve changed the making process because you can now make rapid iterations and developments on a product very quickly, hack other products with printed parts and even produce small batches of products from the comfort of your desk, kitchen or space rocket,’ he says. And when combined with a fantastic making environment like that provided by Makerversity, beautiful (and tasty) things can happen.

3ders.org

by Alec | July 20, 2015

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150720-candy-mechanics-uses-3d-printing-to-turn-selfies-into-edible-candy.html

3D printing – the future of global food?

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/rob-commentary/is-3-d-printing-the-future-of-global-food/article24981139/

Is 3D printing the future of global food?

A few weeks ago, Londoners were able to eat at the world’s first 3D-printed pop-up restaurant. In early June, a German-based company introduced the word’s first plug-and-play food printer, which may be ready for shipping as early as next year. With the cost to produce this technology dropping, making it increasingly accessible, 3D printing could fundamentally change our relationship with food.

Simply put, the process uses ingredients to generate three-dimensional meals by placing layers of compounded food on top of each other. Since 2012, the food industry has used this technology to produce products, including candy, chocolate, pizza, noodles and even crackers. Despite its relative novelty, many companies are recognizing its potential – and recognizing how 3D food printing can revolutionize our global food systems.

In particular, 3D printing could radically alter food production practices by enabling companies to manage resources more responsibly and reduce waste across the food continuum – whether you are a processor, a distributor or a consumer with leftovers. Indeed, many well-known agribusiness corporations have already dedicated a great deal of time and research on 3D systems. There is a potential benefit to consumer health, as well. For example, PepsiCo recently announced that it is using 3D printing to develop a healthier potato chip.

Beyond manufacturing, 3D printing could also boost culinary creativity by allowing renowned chefs to create shapes and forms that were previously thought impossible. Some have argued that it can give the food-service industry the ability to customize products based on individual nutritional needs.

Given the demographic challenges we face in coming decades, this can become a key benefit. In Germany, many nursing homes already produce a pureed 3D-printed food product called smoothfoods to residents who have difficulty ingesting food, or even chewing them. Regular smoothies have been on the menu, but haven’t proved as popular. Elderly residents eating smoothfoods can receive all the nutrients they require while enjoying an aesthetically pleasing meal. As a result, they can live healthier, higher quality lives.

More significantly, some experts believe 3D printing could effectively address global food security challenges. Ingredients such as algae, duckweed and grass could be imbedded into familiar dishes. A recent study in Holland added milled mealworm to a shortbread cookie recipe through 3D printing – most would agree that a cookie-shaped food product is much more appetizing than the look and feel of a worm. By using insects and other protein sources, the growing need for protein the globe is currently experiencing, which adds increased pressure to beef and pork prices, could be mitigated.

3D food printing does still face major obstacles. The technology remains expensive and complex. The engineering required to produce food is much more sophisticated than producing objects with metal and plastic. Food scientists acknowledge how difficult it is to effectively make edible meals in 3D food printing – ingredients in food interact in many complex ways, particularly with meats. At this point, 3D food printers are not known to produce great tasting food, and still do not have the overwhelming endorsement of the culinary world.

However, the technology is improving at an incredible pace, allowing us to believe that very soon, anything might be possible.

The concept of 3D printed food is foreign to many of us, and may challenge our collective appreciation of where food comes from, and how it is produced. Let’s face it – when it comes to food, we are all traditionalists to some extent, protective of our food heritage. Printing food is a drastic departure from the art of cooking as a way of celebrating nature’s bounty.

But the reality is that in just a few years, we will have more than nine billion people to feed. One way to responsibly address global food security challenges is to consider technology as a primary source for sustainable solutions. Treating alternatives to established food production systems as mere fads may not be the best approach.

After all, the future of the dinner table may be as different, and as simple as “Press print and eat.”

theglobeandmail.com

by SYLVAIN CHARLEBOIS | Jun. 17, 2015 10:39AM EDT

Extinct rhinos and 3D printing

http://ecowatch.com/2015/05/08/3d-printing-rhino-horns-stop-poaching/

rhinopopulation

Can 3D Printing Save Rhinos From Going Extinct?

With large-scale poaching causing the once-abundant rhino population to dip to extinction levels, one Seattle-based biotech startup has come up with a deceivingly simple idea to stave demand of the rhino’s coveted horns: fake it.

Pembient, founded earlier this year, is working with rhino horn powder in its labs in order to develop solid rhino horn substitutes, by “duplicating the cells, proteins and deposits in a rhino horn so the synthetic version is genetically similar to the real thing,” the Puget Sound Business Journal reported.

The fascinating part? They’re doing it by using 3D printing. Making something go from this …

Embedded image permalink

To this … (the one in the middle is the fake one)

Embedded image permalink

It’s unclear how exactly Pembient’s making the products, but as TechCrunch explained, “Rhino horns are composed of a specific kind of keratin protein. Pembient figured out the genetic code and was then able to reproduce the horns using the keratin in a 3D-printing technique.”

After Pembient CEO Matthew Markus showed a TechCrunch reporter one of their horn prototypes, Markus said, “You can’t physically tell the difference. No one looking at this could tell this wasn’t from a rhino. It’s the same thing. For all intents and purposes, this is a real rhino horn.”

Rhino horns are used in traditional Chinese medicine and are considered a cure-all for many types of illnesses, driving a devastating global black market. Pembient’s goal is to replace this illegal, $20 billion wildlife trade with fabricated wildlife products, such as rhino horn and elephant ivory, at prices below the levels that induce poaching.

“We surveyed users of rhino horn and found that 45 percent of them would accept using rhino horn made from a lab,” said Pembient. “In comparison, only 15 percent said they would use water buffalo horn, the official substitute for rhino horn.”

Markus also told New Scientist that Vietnamese rhino horn users have said that Pembient’s manufactured rhino powder has a similar smell and feel to wild rhino horns. If all goes to plan, the fake horns could be on the market by next fall at a tenth of the price of illegal ones, the publication reported.

However, conservationists have pointed out that the company’s plan doesn’t placate global demand for real rhino horns, especially in countries where it’s considered a status symbol to own one.

rhino

“The synthetic horns will not have an impact on current rhino horn users that want real horns from dead rhinos,” Douglas Hendrie, technical advisor at Education for Nature–Vietnam told New Scientist.

We’ve seen 3D printers do some pretty incredible things, from “printing” sustainable food to tackling plastic waste. Can this new technology help save the rhino?

ecowatch.com

by  | May 8, 2015 9:15 am

Pop-up restaurant in London with 3D printed foods

http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/pop-up-restaurant-in-london-to-serve-3d-printed-foods-1.2378486

Pop-up restaurant in London to serve 3D printed foods

It’s being billed as the world’s first 3D printed, pop-up restaurant.

To highlight the potential of the emerging technology in the food world, organizers of the 3D Printshow in London have tapped a Michelin-starred chef to create a meal composed entirely of 3D printed foods.

Using fresh and seasonal ingredients, the chef will show attendees at the trade show how to create gourmet dishes in live demonstrations.

3D printed food from Foodini

Visitors will also be taught how to ‘think in 3D’ and tap into the technology’s creative potential by showing off a chocolate globe which opens up to reveal different ‘flavor compartments.’

During the half-day gastronomy conference “Press Print to Eat,” attendees will get hands-on experience on how to cook up recipes using the 3D technology.

“The gastro-revolution continues not only to find new ways to present and prepare our food, but new state-of-the-art ways to create it. From 3D printed chocolate machines for customised party food to micro-engineered nutritional prints, we’ve been slowly edging towards the synthesis of entire meals,” said Kerry Hogarth, founder of 3D Printshow, in a statement.

Indeed, some experts predict that 3D printing has the potential of revolutionizing the way we eat, calling it the future of food.

Others go so far as claiming that 3D printers will become as common as the microwave in the average household.

At one end of the spectrum, the technology is being eyed by the world of haute gastronomy: ChefJet Pro, for instance, debuted as the world’s first professional food 3D printer and is designed to help pastry chefs create bespoke confections for their cakes, candies and desserts.

Think edible lace, latticework, sculptural and ornate cakes, toppers, candies and confectionery.

At the other end, there’s the Foodini, designed by Natural Machines as a household appliance that allows home cooks to create foods like homemade ravioli and custom-designed cookies — minus the labor.

To use, consumers feed the countertop appliance with fresh foods and ingredients.

3D Printshow London takes place at The Old Truman Brewery in London May 21-23.

References:

ctvnews.ca

http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/pop-up-restaurant-in-london-to-serve-3d-printed-foods-1.2378486

The future of food!

http://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/3d-food-printers-how-they-could-change-what-you-eat/

3D Printed color flavored sugar

WHY 3D FOOD PRINTING IS MORE THAN JUST A NOVELTY; IT’S THE FUTURE OF FOOD

It was Marcel Boulestin, the first cook-turned-television star from the BBC’s 1937 show Cook’s Night Out, who insisted that cooking was not chemistry but an art. “It requires instinct and taste rather than exact measurements,” he said.

If only he could see the world now.

It’s 2015, and 3D printing, a technology long priced beyond many people’s reach, is quickly undergoing democratization. So much democratization that companies are trying to 3D print all kinds of new things, including food.

Think about the replicators on Star Trek and the many other machines that litter science fiction movies, which prep, cook, and serve meals on command. This could actually be our future. 3D food printing has the potential to revolutionize food production by boosting culinary creativity, food sustainability, and nutritional customizability, but technical and market barriers still face it in the years to come.

3D printing food ain’t easy

Most 3D printers work by slowly depositing layers of material, one on top of the other, until an object is constructed. The process is called “additive manufacturing,” and it uses deposition printers. Others bind layers together with adhesive — they’re called binding printers.

3D food printers are more difficult to explain. Hod Lipson, director of Cornell University’s Creative Machines Lab, laid out the three dominant methods of printing food at the 2015 Inside 3D Printing conference in New York City, which are nozzles, powdery material, and lasers. “You can think of it as the ‘RGB of food,’” he told Digital Trends.

Many systems mix and match those approaches. The 3D Systems ChefJet crystalizes thin layers of fine-grain sugar into virtually any geometric configuration, while Natural Foods’ Choc Edge dispenses chocolate from syringes in beautiful, melty patterns. The Foodini uses fresh ingredients loaded into stainless steel capsules to prepare a surprisingly wide array of dishes. Its latest model isn’t a soup-to-nuts solution — it only prints raw doughs, which then must be cooked as normal — but the printer can partially make pizza, filled pasta, quiche, and even brownies.

None of these machines will be next in line for the Bocuse d’Or chef championship, though. Emilio Sepulveda, co-founder of Foodini maker Natural Machines, has said publically that food synthesizers like those seen in Star Trekand The Fifth Element will take “many more years” of development.

Choc Edge Choc Creator V1

But that’s not stopping early adopters. Some German nursing homes serve a 3D-printed food product called Smoothfoods to elderly residents who have difficulty chewing. Purees, the conventional alternative, typically aren’t very appetizing, which sometimes leads to under eating. Residents “get malnourished in certain cases,” said Kjeld van Bommel, a research scientist at the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, in an interview with the Washington Post.

The tastier Smoothfoods — made of mashed carrots, peas, and broccoli, which 3D printers congealed with an edible glue — are already a hit; 1,000 of the country’s facilities now serve them daily.

3D food printers invade the gourmet world

On the opposite end of the gastronomic spectrum, 3D food printers are beginning to breach gourmet spaces. Earlier this year at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) unveiled a partnership with 3D Systems, maker of the ChefJet. The CIA plans to begin beta testing with the ChefJef, and 3D Systems will provide CIA students with fellowship and internship programs at the company’s headquarters in Los Angeles.

Tom Vacarro, dean of Baking and Pastry Arts at CIA,spoke to WAMC Northeast Public Radio about the arrangement. “We just took that ran with it and said, okay, we could do many different things with these printers and here’s our ideas” he said. “[You can] design your mold on the screen, and hit print, and out it comes. It just shaves off all of that back-and-forth time.”

3D Systems Creative Director Liz von Hasseln, speaking at CES, said she sees food printing “as something that … will become a part of the culinary fabric.”

“I think the way that happens really powerfully is when it impacts the cultural ritual of eating, which is actually a really powerful part of being a person in the world,” she clarified. Hasseln predicts most of her team’s culinary experiments, which include shaping chocolate and sugar into wedding cake toppers and cocktail garnishes, are just the beginning. Cornell’s Lipson agrees.

3D printed sugar cake topper - blue china

“These are things that no pastry chef, no confectionary chef could ever make,” he said. “They represent a new design space in food. We’re getting to that point of artistry.”

Food printing moves beyond the kitchen

Other chefs are looking beyond the kitchen. Dutch food designer Chloé Rutzerveld documented the creation of cracker-like yeast structures containing seeds and spores that sprout over time, and thinks the snack he synthesized and those like it — natural, transportable products printed efficiently — could someday transform the food industry. And he’s not alone.

Some experts believe food printers could minimize waste by using cartridges of hydrocolloids, substances that form gels with water. Those same machines, they theorize, could also use unpalatable but plentiful ingredients — ingredients such as algae, duckweed, and grass — to form the basis of familiar dishes. In a study headed by Van Bommel, scientists added milled mealworm to a shortbread cookie recipe. “The look [of the worms] put me off, but in the shape of a cookie I’ll eat it,” he said in an interview with Popular Mechanics.

To that point, people are very conservative when it comes to food, Lipson said. “Most people will only enjoy foods that are very similar to what they’ve had before. We have a very deep, visceral reaction to foods we don’t recognize,” he said. 3D food printers could be used to make the unappetizing, appetizing.

“Consider a food source that’s not something you’d want to eat in its raw form but a good source of protein, like insects,” Lipson said. “There’s an interesting advantage there — being able to make something that looks and tastes good from something that doesn’t.”

Anajan Contract, an engineer who’s currently developing a pizza-making printer with a $125,000 grant from NASA’s Small Business Innovation Research program, envisions a machine that can produce food from capsules of powders and oils with shelf lives up to 30 years. He believes such a printer would not only reduce the environmental impact of cooking, but also offer a renewable form of sustenance to a growing world population.

Chloé Rutzerveld Edible Growth

“I think, and many economists think, that current food systems can’t supply 12 billion people sufficiently,” he told Quartz. “So we eventually have to change our perception of what we see as food.”

Beyond sustainability, 3D food printing holds great promise for nutrition. Lynette Kucsma, CMO and co-founder of Natural Machines, says printers like the Foodini can help people cut down on the amount of chemical additives in their food and reduce overconsumption. The food printers of tomorrow could even allow customization at the macronutritional level, allowing users individualize the amounts of calcium, protein, omega-3, and carbohydrates in their meals.

“You’ll be able to say when I wake up in the morning I want the printer to print my breakfast and I want to have the right amount of trans fats, whatever we need,” said Lipson.

The many obstacles ahead

But 3D food printing has many challenges to overcome, chief among them speed. Devices like the recently announced Carbon3D can fabricate a mind-boggling number of objects in minutes, but that level of advancement hasn’t trickled down to food printers yet. The most common designs require successive layers of ingredient to cool, leading to exceedingly long wait times for some foods.

Many food printers have chocolate, dough, and sugar nailed, but more complicated products like meat are tougher to master. “Printing in food materials is a lot more difficult from an engineering point of view than plastic of metals,” said Lipson. “They interact with each other in very complex ways.”

That’s not to say producing them isn’t feasible. Modern Meadow, a company in New York, raised $10 million in funding to research the production of printable biomaterials — but achieving the right texture and flavor is a lot harder. And even if scientists are able to closely replicate natural beef, consumers might not bite; in a survey by GlobalMeatNews.com, only 34 percent of respondents said they’d even try 3D-printed meat.

There’s also the issue of expectations. The Star Trek replicator comes to mind when many people think about food synthesizers, but such a device would hardly be practical — a simple vegetable, like a tomato, would likely require tens of millions of different ingredient cartridges alone. “It sounds simple to say ‘we’ll have a fat cartridge,’ but there are hundreds of kinds of fats,” van Brommel explained.

And how does the culinary world at large feel about 3D food printers? I’ll let Tony Tantillo, food expert and contributor to CBS in New York, expresses a sentiment felt by many: “Those two things shouldn’t be together. ‘Printed food’ for a magazine, yes. But to eat? Nah, nah.” Vacarro thinks they might have a place… in cheap in-and-out joints. “If I think about what’s happening in fast food, there might be something there where some fast foods are printed instead of handmade,” he said.

Natural Machines Foodini

But perhaps like any new technology, 3D food printers just take some getting used to. “When people first heard about microwaves they didn’t understand the technology,” Lynette Kucsama, Chief Marketing Officer at Natural Machines told Fortune. “Now 90 percent of households have microwaves.”

3D food printers may not produce great-tasting food right now, or be able to cook meals from scratch. Or have the wholehearted endorsement of the epicurean elite. But they’re getting better every year, and what they promise — sustainable, nutritional perfection — is worth the pursuit.

“I don’t see 3D food printing as a novelty. I see it as something that really will become a part of the culinary fabric for years to come,” von Hasseln said recently.

A lot changes in 70 years. Boulestin, like any great chef on the bleeding edge of gastronomy, would understand that.

digitaltrends.com

by | April 26, 2015

Bacon Möbius strip !

http://www.networkworld.com/article/2906116/tech-primers/bacony-goodness-math-3d-printing-an-inedible-endless-bacon-mbius-strip.html

bacon mobius

Bacony goodness + math + 3D printing = an inedible endless Bacon Möbius strip

It’s not for human consumption but is it art?

If you take a strip of bacon and twist one end through 180 degrees then join the two ends you get a piece of bacon with only one side, a Bacon Möbius strip. Cool. But if you want such a thing to adorn your desk (and who wouldn’t?) then being made of real bacon would be, to say the least, a bad idea. So,  to memorialize this mathematical and culinary wonder, why not print a look-alike on a 3D printer? Why not indeed?

This exactly is what a designer with the handle “joabaldwin” created using the Shapeways 3D printing service.

Need one for your desk? It’s 3.346″ w x 3.024″ d x 1.399″ h (the precision is awesome) and it’s just $19 …

networkworld.com

by  | Apr 5, 2015 2:34 PM PT

3D printing with Easy Cheese !

http://www.cnet.com/news/3d-printing-with-easy-cheese-isnt-so-easy/

Turns out 3D printing with Easy Cheese isn’t so easy

Delve into the complicated and messy world of spray-cheese 3D printing as a maker attempts to produce gooey cheese forts and cracker toppings. No, it’s not an April Fools’ joke.

Innovations in 3D printing are coming fast and furious these days. There seems to be particular interest in food-related printers capable of making anything from pizza to pancakes. But the world has really been crying out for a spray-cheese printer, and now we have one in the form of the Easy Cheese 3D Printer.

The printer uses a special mechanism to trigger the cheese can while the print head moves around to position the cheese in the correct location. At least that’s the idea. It doesn’t always go as planned. Sometimes the trigger puller slips off, resulting in no cheese being dispensed. Sometimes the cheese bubbles up around the print head, creating a gooey mess.

There are a couple of minor moments of triumph. The printer does a decent job of squeezing a mound of cheese out onto a cracker, though it fails to cleanly disconnect the cheese stream. It also creates a passable spray-cheese fort in the form of a square with layers of cheese. Let’s face it, this innovation isn’t likely to attract NASA’s attention.

The experiment comes from the creative mind of Andrew Maxwell-Parish, manager of the Hybrid Lab at the California College of the Arts. Previously, he designed an interactive tip jar called the Wu-Tang Can and a High Five Camera for capturing high fives with strangers. Suddenly, the Easy Cheese 3D printer concept doesn’t seem so out there anymore.

cnet.com

by | April 1, 2015 11:18 AM PDT

3D printed food which grows itself!

It’s Alive! 3D Printed Food Which Grows Itself

http://www.dezeen.com/…/movie-3d-printed-food-living-organ…/

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

Food designer Chloé Rutzerveld has developed a concept for “healthy and sustainable” 3D-printed snacks that sprout plants and mushrooms for flavour.

Rutzerveld‘s Edible Growth project consists of 3D-printed shapes containing a mixture of seeds, spores and yeast, which will start to grow after only a few days.

“Edible growth is exploring how 3D printing could transform the food industry,” she says in the movie. “It is about 3D printing with living organisms, which will develop into a fully grown edible.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

Each of the basket-like 3D-printed structures, which Rutzerveld presented at Dutch Design Week 2014, contains an edible centre of agar – a gelatinous substance that enables the seeds and spores to sprout.

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

As the plants and mushrooms grow, the flavour also develops, transforming into what Rutzerveld claims is a fresh, nutritious and tasty snack after only a few days.

“As it comes out of the 3D printer you can really see the straight lines of the technology,” she says. “But as it develops, you can see organic shapes. You can see the stages of growth and the development of taste and flavour.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

The aim of the project, which Rutzerveld developed in collaboration with the Eindhoven University of Technology and research organisation TNO, was to investigate ways that 3D printing could be used in the food industry.

“By 3D printing food you can make the production chain very short, the transport will be less, there is less land needed,” says Rutzerveld.”But also you can experiment with new structures. You can surprise the consumer with new food and things that haven’t been done before.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

In particular, Rutzerveld wanted to find a way that 3D printers could be used to create fresh and healthy food at home.

“A lot of people think industrialised production methods are unnatural or unhealthy,” Rutzerveld says. “I want to show that it doesn’t have to be the case. You can really see that it’s natural. It’s actually really healthy and sustainable also at the same time.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

However, Rutzerveld’s project is still at the research and development stage and she admits it will be a long time before anyone is able to 3D-print her snacks at home.

“It will take at least another eight to ten years before this can be on the market,” she concedes. “The technologies really need to be developed much further.”

Chloé Rutzerveld

Dezeen and MINI Frontiers is an ongoing collaboration with MINI exploring how design and technology are coming together to shape the future.

Dezeen and MINI Frontiers

DEZEEN.COM
by Ben Hobson |  Thursday, February 26th, 2015 at 1:06 pm

3Digital Cooks!

You’ve Heard of 3D Printing with Plastic, Concrete, and Perhaps Even Bio-material… But This is A Little Different!

http://goo.gl/vT8TO1

hum

Everyone’s favorite go-to party dip is now a 3D printing medium thanks to our friends at 3DigitalCooks (3DC), who recently introduced us to 3D printing with bananas. 3DC is a website that provides the latest news in digital gastronomy. 3D food innovators from around the world share new technologies and creative ideas and solutions relevant to the culinary branch of 3D printing. Now, 3DC’s founder, Luis Rodriguez Alcalde, who lives in Barcelona, Spain, is showcasing the second generation of the 3D food printer he designed, the Pinya2. It seems that the Pinya had some shortcomings and, with Pinya2, Rodriguez Alcalde has worked out the kinks and presents his Lucky Hummus.
color hummus

This colorful presentation of our favorite variation on the chick pea is actually pretty easy to produce. Of course, notes digital chef Rodriguez Alcalde, you’ll need a 3D printer “that works with syringes, cartridges, capsules or any similar container.” He used Pinya2 but you can also have a look at 3DC’s website and see what machines other digital culinary makers are using. Rodriguez Alcalde’s Instructables page also provides instructions for making this delectable digital dish and for creating other print patterns using colorful hummus.

You’ll need to make a batch of hummus and we think it’s probably a good idea to use his recipe, which calls for 150 grams (about 5 ¼ oz.) of chickpeas, 20 grams (3/4 ounce) of tahini, about a tablespoon of olive oil, and a pinch of salt. You’ll also want to make some avocado purée — it’s the green in the leaves of this lucky hummus four-leaf clover that you’ll fill in after you’ve 3D printed the hummus forms. We trust you can handle the purée without using a recipe.

You will need food coloring, a container for each color of hummus, a tablespoon, and a fork. Thin slices of a cherry tomato create the long petal-like garnishes seen in the photo. You don’t need much more than a kitchen blender to make the hummus and the avocado purée. Don’t go crazy with the blending, however; the hummus needs to be fairly thick so that it can be successfully extruded.

You’ll be printing your edible masterpiece on top of a piece of toast or a large cracker.

Here’s basically how the hummus printing works: After mixing the separate colors, you load a a large tablespoon full of hummus into the printing cartridge. Insert one color at a time, pressing one down on the next to create a kind of rainbow effect in the cartridge. Avoid creating any pockets of air in the mixture, as we are reminded that “air pockets are our enemies” when it comes to 3D printing food.

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Rodriguez Alcalde explained that Lucky Hummus was created to test out 3DC’s new air extrusion system that, basically, utilizes compressed air to force the material through the extruder.

A new design tool was also developed specifically for this project. 3DC used Roses, a Javascript tool that, says Rodriguez Alcalde, “uses rhodonea curves equation to generate printing paths for Pinya. The tool result,” he explained, “is a GCode file that works directly with the printer. Somehow it combines design (roses) and slicing (GCode generation).”

He shared a link to the download on the blog page for the Lucky Hummusproject. Although creating a new tool like Roses might seem unnecessarily time-consuming, Rodriguez Alcalde explained that it actually allowed him to eliminate the excess. That is, to include only the parameters required specifically for the Lucky Hummus four-leaf clover pattern.

After several test prints, this pragmatic digital chef observed that lumpy hummus can be a serious impediment to the printing process and encourages those of you who want to try this at home to smooth out the lumps. Also, Rodriguez Alcalde, who emphasizes that he is not a chef, and evidently learned the hard way added: “For [the] avocado purée, keep in mind to balance lemon juice.” If you’ve made guacamole or anything else using avocados then you probably know that lemon or lime juice will keep the green from turning brown, which will definitely make for a more accurate four-leaf hummus clover.

Do try this at home and let us and the team at 3C know how it turns out!

3DPRINT.COM
by  | FEBRUARY 18, 2015