3D printing with light

http://3dprint.com/89024/calarts-3d-printing-with-light/

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CalArts Student Experiments with 3D Printing Light

Not all 3D printing is meant to last. When CalArts student Aaron Bothman decided to print something for his short film The Red Witch, his thesis project, he wanted it to be less permanent. Having seen the work of Beijing-based artist Ekaggrat Singh Kalsi, who has used a modified 3D printer to ‘print’ in light, he found his inspiration.

Not something that you can pick up with your hands, the product of this technique is something that can be captured on film, which is exactly the medium in which Bothman works.

He and his father worked together on building the printer, a small delta model constructed from a kit but with a particular twist. When assembled, an LED was placed where the hot end would usually have been installed. This allows Bothman to capture the light on film by using a long exposure while the printer runs the model, tracing out the shapes as a 3D light painting.

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This isn’t the first 3D printing project that Bothman junior and Bothman senior have worked on together. In an interview with 3DPrint.com, Aaron talked about his experience printing with his father and how it has influenced his work both while at CalArts and after graduation:

“I’m an animator and artist based in Los Angeles. I graduated from the animation program at CalArts a couple months ago, and am currently working as an artist at JibJab, a small studio in LA. I originally learned about 3D printing in middle school from my dad, who teaches mechanical engineering at UCSB, and who helped a lot in thinking through this project. As a stop-motion filmmaker, 3D printing allows me to tackle more ambitious projects on a short production schedule than I might be able to otherwise.”

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In order to create the light animation, each Maya image to be captured is sent to the printer one frame at a time. Over time, these images create the illusion of movement, just as is done in more traditional stop motion filming. The result is a piece that is built up in layers, requiring the same mode of conceptualization as a 3D printing project but with the option for movement and, of course, no support materials. In fact, no materials at all, something that makes this a particularly appealing way to engage in a 3D printed project if there is no need for the product to be tangible.

Somewhat akin to the old question about a tree falling in the forest with no one to hear it, the question that could be asked of this technique could be: when a 3D printer creates something that cannot be touched, is it still 3D printing? The creations don’t truly occupy space or at least they only do for a fleeting moment but as they dance before your eyes, I think you may be willing to set that debate aside for a moment. Just think of it this way: with this technique, you could print all you want and never run up a bill for filament and never have to worry about storage space.

And that sounds pretty ideal to me.

Let us know what you think about this concept in the 3D Printing with Light forum thread at 3DPB.com.

3dprint.com

by  | AUGUST 15, 2015

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3D printed props and costumes

Sky News Features A Few Awesome 3D Printed Movie Props

http://goo.gl/mFyFD7

Film studios are turning to special effects companies with 3D printers for quick turnarounds of detailed outfits.

Movie props and costumes are getting more elaborate and intricate because of an unlikely new character in Hollywood – the 3D printer.

Film studios are increasingly turning to special effects companies with 3D printers so that outfits can be created more quickly and with some impressive detail.

The process isn’t cheap – but there’s less of a need for actors to stand around nearly naked in plaster casts anymore.

Grant Pearmain, director at FB FX, told Sky News the design process has been revolutionised by the technology.

He said: “A 3D printer can make something that a normal person just can’t physically make, by the way it prints, kind of overlaps and underlaps.”

Among the many blockbuster movie pieces co-designed by Mr Pearmain’s company is the helmet worn by actor Chris Pratt when he starred as Star Lord in Guardians Of The Galaxy.

It was printed ready to wear straight away.

The A-lister’s co-star Djimon Hounsou – who played the baddie Korath – also received the 3D printer treatment.

Mr Pearmain added: “The designer wanted a look on that film of a kind of armour that you just wouldn’t traditionally be able to make – it would be really impossible to do.

“We worked quite hard to create 3D-printed parts that were strong enough that that entire costume could be built that way.”

Parts of Christian Bale’s helmet and armour, as he played Moses in Exodus: Gods And Kings, were also 3D printed.

Gary Miller, head of 3D printing facility IPF, told Sky News: “It’s got to the stage now where if you don’t have access to this technology you’re kind of working with one arm tied behind your back.

“It’s so fast. We’re printing in the evening on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, and supplying the studios on Monday morning to go fitting straight onto the actors.”

The method also means special visual effects designers in the UK can send over prototypes to US studios for approval more quickly.

However, 3D printing has been criticised for being expensive. There have been rumblings over potential job losses too.

Technician Jack Rothwell operates a digital 3D body scanner for actors at Shepperton Studios.

He said: “I think there are fears, I think especially for people who haven’t grown up with computers who are traditional model makers … it’s a struggle to incorporate this into their work flow.”

However, film journalist Tom Butler, told us the situation may balance itself out in the long run.

“You will always need a skilled engineer at the front end to design the thing in the first place.”

And as the cost drops and the tech improves further, there are high hopes for the future.

He added: “I don’t think it’s too far-fetched to think that in the future Star Wars films the storm troopers will be wearing 3D-printed costumes.”

NEWS.SKY.COM
by Gemma Morris, Sky News Presenter | Friday 20 February 2015 20:30, UK

TALOS

Say hello to TALOS… A.K.A REAL-LIFE. FUNCTIONING. IRON MAN. SUITS

Legacy Effects, the costume and special effects company responsible for creating the suits used in the Iron Man films, are now creating a similar suit for the US Military called TALOS.

The US Military has already invested $ 10 million and they state that the suit “must be bulletproof, weaponized, have the ability to monitor vitals and give the wearer superhuman strength and perception.”

Expected to be completed in 2018. Stark Industries reportedly not receiving any royalties.

Oh, and of course the prototypes are going to be 3D-printed 😉

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/…/Iron-Man-suit-for-US-military-…

Might TALOS end up looking like Iron Patriot from Iron Man 3?

The makers of the Iron Man suit for The Avengers are consulting with the US military on weaponized armour.

In the Iron Man and The Avengers films, rich and ingenius playboy Tony Stark creates a powered suit of armour to save his life, and then the world.

The US military have been inspired, it appears, as they have gone to Hollywood costume and special effects creators Legacy Effects for advice on making an Iron Man-style suit, known as TALOS (Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit), for their troops.

The brief for TALOS states that it must be bulletproof, weaponised, have the ability to monitor vitals and give the wearer superhuman strength and perception.

Legacy Effects, on behalf of exoskeleton manufacturers Ekso Bionics, made the Iron Man suit for the Marvel films.

According to The Wall Steet Journal, Legacy Effects are among the bigger manufacturers involved in the project and will help the US Military to design and 3D print prototypes.

TELEGRAPH.CO.UK