6 futuristic 3D printed clothes!

http://www.engadget.com/2015/09/04/6-futuristic-3d-printed-clothes/

6 futuristic 3D-printed clothes

3D printing is revolutionizing the way we make things, from buildings and cars to medical devices. But that’s not all: Many forward-thinking designers in the fashion industry are using 3D printers to cut down on material waste and explore new possibilities for unique and exciting designs. Read on to learn about some of the most advanced 3D-printed clothes and wearables that they’ve cooked up.

References:

engadget.com

by Inhabitat | September 4th 2015 At 2:00pm

http://www.engadget.com/2015/09/04/6-futuristic-3d-printed-clothes/

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3D printed beef slices?

http://www.straitstimes.com/opinion/do-you-still-need-cows-if-you-can-3d-print-beef-slices

Do you still need cows, if you can 3D print beef slices?

Two scientists look at how Singapore is preparing to embrace two leading technologies – 3D printing and robotics.

Additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing, as it is more commonly known, is a term that is becoming more familiar, used not only by large corporations and institutions but also smaller enterprises and even individuals.

Simply put, 3D printing refers to processes that produce a 3D part from a computer-aided design model by adding materials successively, usually in a layer-by-layer fashion. These materials can be made of paper, plastic, metal or even organic materials such as tissue from cells.

3D printing in itself is not new. It has been used for over three decades, such as for printing out prototypes for designs or architectural works. But today, its usage has expanded beyond prototyping. Many industries and people now use 3D printing to make things they want, which include producing unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) used in Aerospace and Defence.

As technology continues to develop and become more widespread, we are led to potentially discover new or more extensive benefits to society. In building and construction, the ability to print complicated design structures within a shorter time and with fewer resources would help to reduce housing shortage in countries like Singapore. Globally, this could also help disaster-struck countries to quickly rebuild affected communities.

Due to its game-changing potential, AM or 3D printing is forecast by The Economist magazine to be the third Industrial Revolution.

Today, manufacturers are already witnessing the positive impact of 3D printing technology in terms of enabling greater customisation while reducing costs and waste.

As products are manufactured on demand, this reduces tooling costs and the need to maintain a massive product inventory typical of traditional manufacturing methods.

From a business perspective, we also see companies evolving towards more flexible and cost-effective business models. Some may choose to focus solely on design and leave customers to manufacture the actual product. Conversely, smaller players can now manufacture their own products instead of relying on larger manufacturing chains. Along with lower investment costs and risks, this has opened doors and created opportunities for new entrants within the manufacturing field. These will shake up manufacturing as we know it today.

Companies that now produce spare parts or equipment for big manufacturers may find themselves squeezed out if the manufacturers find it more worthwhile to 3D print the parts themselves.

Shipping too can change, if ships carry their own 3D machines to print parts, or 3D print their own supplies, eliminating the need to stop at ports for repairs and resupplies.

Even space travel can be revolutionised: One exciting area of potential application is 3D printing in space, which can be used to produce necessities such as food as well as essential tools and spare parts necessary for extensive space missions.

Over the coming decades, 3D printing technology certainly has tremendous potential to revolutionise our next phase of development.

The promise of bioprinting – or the printing of live tissue – is immense. This potentially allows us to 3D print a new organ for transplant. Bioprinting has the eventual goal of improving the quality of life whether for transplant patients or for society at large.

It also has clear applications in food. After all, 3D printing allows us to produce meat for consumption by printing them with layers of animal tissue – without the need for animal husbandry or slaughter.

Bioprinting food will also minimise the risk of diseases such as mad cow disease or bird flu by eliminating the need to rear livestock for human consumption.

With the aim of empowering the average home user, the Blacksmith Group invented the Blacksmith Genesis, the world’s first 3D printer-cum-scanner. As compact as a home printer, the Blacksmith Genesis allows users to scan, edit and print any item up to 6,650 cubic cm in 3D easily. This user-friendly device enables users without much knowledge of 3D software to engineer their own products.

The Blacksmith Group is a spin-off from the Nanyang Technological University’s (NTU) newly established Singapore Centre for 3D Printing (SC3DP).

Supported by Singapore’s National Research Foundation, SC3DP was set up to drive research and collaboration towards growing Singapore’s 3D printing capabilities for the aerospace and defence, building and construction, marine and offshore and manufacturing industries.

Taking it one step further is 4D printing, which refers to the printing of three-dimensional materials with properties that will transform according to external or environmental stimuli, such as time, temperature or humidity.

Possible applications that would prove useful are using it to print the soles of shoes or sofas which can then be easily manipulated to fit the shapes and sizes of human bodies.

4D printing might also be useful for printing structures for transporting across dramatically different environments, such as from earth to space. In this case, imagine if we could print a piece of furniture in a compact format that can be subsequently assembled into a larger, complex structure in space.

Given the rate at which 3D printing technology is progressing, it is not difficult to envision that 50 years from now, we could be living in 3D printed houses, travelling on 3D printed airplanes, wearing 3D printed garments, consuming 3D printed food and much more.

The possibilities are limitless.

  • Professor Chua Chee Kai is the Executive Director, Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, at the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University.

References:

straitstimes.com

http://www.straitstimes.com/opinion/do-you-still-need-cows-if-you-can-3d-print-beef-slices

Our own 3D printed clothes!

http://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2015/jul/28/are-we-ready-to-print-our-own-3d-clothes

3D printed fashion by Danit Peleg

Are we ready to 3D print our own clothes?

3D printing in fashion might not be new. But one designer thinks soon everbody will just print their entire wardrobe, which could change holiday packing for ever.

Imagine going on holiday with an empty suitcase, checking out the vibe of the hotel bar on arrival, then printing out the perfect dress to match it in your room. Such a delicious possibility could be on offer – one day – thanks to 3D printing. In fact, the work of one fashion student, Danit Peleg, suggests it could be edging nearer.

Danit Peleg working on her 3D printed fashion

From a mesh-effect little black dress to a bright red jacket emblazoned with the word “Liberté”, Peleg produced her entire graduate collection using a 3D printer. Though others have worked with printers before – it has become Dutch designer Iris van Herpen’s signature, in fact, with spooky space-age ensembles appearing on catwalks and on Björk – this is the first full collection designed to be produced, specifically, on the smaller machines that can be used in people’s homes.

LBD? Danit Peleg's 3D printed dress

As the sometimes spooky, often spiky, world of 3D fashion goes, the pieces are fairly wearable – they are a riot of geometric shapes and futuristic patterns, but the texture is bouncy, rather than dusty and hard, thanks to the use of a flexible material called FilaFlex. Peleg’s latticed maxi skirt is very on-trend – long, transparent skirts that show off the wearer’s underwear have become a recent catwalk and red carpet staple, seen at Dolce and Gabbana and Valentino, although Peleg claims inspiration in Eugène Delacroix’s “Liberty Leading the People” – and the triangular shapes found in the composition of the painting.

<strong>Texture</strong> Danit Peleg’s 3D printed fashion

We’re probably quite a few summers away from this becoming part of your holiday packing strategy, however, given the costs and time involved. The red “Liberté” jacket, says Peleg, a student from Israel’s Shenkar art and design school, “took 220 hours to print and about a kilo of materials. Materials would cost 70 euros. But the main issue is printing time – one would need to buy or rent a printer for 220 hours. A printer of the type I used costs 1,700 euros. Renting it would maybe cost 250 euros per week, so I would peg it at at least 600 euros for printing, not including design, assembly, and electricity. It’s still a costly operation, but of course this will change as technologies evolve.” Clothes are printed section by section and are then assembled.

Danit Peleg 3D printed fashion

But one day, says Peleg, the process could be pretty simple. “Customers could download the patterns, just like music files, and print them.”

theguardian.com

by  | Tuesday 28 July 2015 

3D printed functioning motorcycle

http://www.gizmag.com/te-3d-printed-motorcycle/37729/

The 3D-printed motorcycle, on display

TE Connectivity 3D prints a functioning motorcycle

Unveiled at Rapid 2015 in Long Beach, California, TE Connectivity’s exercise in 3D printing demonstrates the ability to design a motorcycle on a computer, print it in plastic, add tires and a motor, then take it for a spin. While the result may not quite be ready to hit the highway, the concept is still nothing short of exciting.

The steering head is the most heavily stressed part of the frame in any motorcycle, yet this plastic one can handle two-up riding Printing a wheel rim strong enough to hold an inflated tire is not an easy task This V2 is just a plastic mock-up, the real motor is hidden in the fake "oil tank" behind it All the electrical components work properly on TE's prototype motorcycle

Considering that fundamental parts such as the frame and wheel bearings are entirely printed in plastic, one would agree that TE’s goal to show that the technology can be used to manufacture load-bearing production parts has been achieved.

Modeled in a Harley-Davidson Softail fashion, the motorcycle measures around 8 ft (2.4 m) long, weighs 250 lb (113.4 kg) and consists of more components than its designers can account for. Its frame, printed after a process of trial and error, can support a total of 400 lb (181 kg) – that would be two adult passengers. Apart from the small electric motor and tires, some other outsourced parts include the braking system, electrical wiring, battery, belt drive, mirrors, sidestand and some bolts.

The highlight is, of course, its fully functioning status. A small 1 hp (750W) electric motor can power a 15 mph (24 km/h) ride for several minutes. Though this may not sound ground-breaking, it doesn’t necessarily need a bigger battery or a stronger engine to make a point as a showbike at a conference on printing, scanning and additive manufacturing. All that matters is that, after some 1,000 work hours and US$25,000, TE Connectivity has come up with a proper motorcycle indeed.

The main load-bearing parts were constructed with Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology, the process of injecting layer upon layer of ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) plastic enriched with the heat resistant resin Ultem 9085. With this process, TE printed several parts with complex dynamic properties, such as the frame.

The wheel bearings sound tricky to fabricate, especially the rear one that was printed into a single piece with the hub and the drive sprocket. After some testing miles, both bearings reportedly held up against the load they must bear and the heat generated in the process. Equally difficult work has probably been involved in the fabrication of the wheel rims, which have to support real motorcycle tires with fully-inflated tubes.

Some metal parts like the headlight housing were printed in bronze through Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS), where a laser melts the desired shape out of several layers of metal powder.

Apparently this is the second prototype or, more precisely, a rebuild of the first after it suffered some damage during transportation. Thankfully creative minds saw this as an opportunity rather than a calamity, finding the chance to make some improvements on the original design.

Although it seems highly improbable for an electronic connector and sensor manufacturer to build any more motorcycles, TE Connectivity’s achievement highlights some promising prospects. Already several DMLS applications are available to the automotive and aerospace industries though companies like EOS. Stratasys, whose printers worked overtime for this project in TE’s labs, is currently in a partnership with Ducati advising the Italians on developing in-house FDM prototyping. By printing functional prototype engines, Ducati has been able to cut the development time of a new Desmosedici race engine for MotoGP from 28 to only eight months. Benefits from this process are expected to reach production models sooner or later.

TE Connectivity initially thought of printing a model of a motorcycle as a display of sculpting skills. This had already been done, several times over. The idea of a functioning bike was born in the process, probably out of the realization that it could actually be done. After all, the first printed car was unveiled and driven in public just last September.

3D printing technology is advancing by leaps and bounds, having progressed in just a few years from forming simple ornamental plastic parts to generating dynamic structures that function within moving mechanisms. In this sense, this motorcycle that looks like a child’s toy may well prove to be a landmark product.

gizmag.com

by  | May 29, 2015

3D printed fashion shows

http://www.digitaltrends.com/features/inside-new-yorks-3d-print-fashion-show/

Melinda Looi + Materlise

Inside one of the first 3D printed fashion shows in America

“For me, fashion is an expression of art and I’m very excited to explore the technology’s potential to change how clothes are made and rst.”

How much would you pay for a pair of shoes customized to fit you perfectly? How about wearing your favorite piece of art? Welcome to 3D-printed fashion.

MecklerMedia will host its first 3D Print Fashion Show in the United States in New York April 16, showcasing the latest items from the top designers across the world. The company promises “the top 3D print designers from around the world will create original pieces” that will debut at the show. One of the show’s main attractions: Fashion designer Melinda Looi will reveal, what is eventually world’s first full-length evening gown, 3D-printed as a single part flexible enough to slink and vamp with a woman’s body.

“When you think of constructing with a sewing machine, you’re always thinking in terms of how to use fabric and thread,” Looi told Digital Trends. “But with 3D printing, you’re not limited to that.” Looi is a veteran designer, having won Designer of the Year three times at the Malaysian International Fashion Week. The enthusiastic designer will debut her second 3D collection in collaboration with the fashion show’s sponsor, 3D print software provider Materialise. Her first collaborative collection with Materialise — inspired by birds — came in 2013 at Malaysia’s first printed fashion show.

“3D printing will change the world,” Looi explains. “Maybe not now, but in times to come 3D printing will usher in a new era by enabling machines to produce objects of any shape, on the spot, and as needed.”

Francis Bitonti Studio + Michael Schmidt Studios + Shapeways

Indeed, 3D-printed clothing has caught fire among designers across the globe. Materalise and Looi put on Asia’s first two 3D print fashion shows in Malaysia andJapan, three months apart in 2013. The following year, Geek Picnic 2014 — an open-air festival held annually in St. Petersburg, Russia — showcased 3D print clothing alongside robot giants and virtual-reality headsets at the first 3D print fashion show in Russia. Later this year, Boston will host its first 3D printing jewelry competition courtesy of Design Museum Boston, New England’s only design museum. And 3D Printshow has held events for the advancements in the space since 2012; it held its first fashion show in New York City last year.

The future will strut its stuff on the catwalk, in other words — yet it’s still far from a reality today.

How soon is now?

Interest in 3D-printed clothing may be at its highest ever, but trucks full of printed clothing won’t flood your local H&M any time soon. Creating the future is taxing financially, with a single dress costing upwards of $3,000 just to produce at the moment.

“Currently accessories and garment accessories are the only commercial way forward, as a complete gown is just too expensive,” Looi said. And garments that come from the current generation of 3D printers lack the durability everyday clothing requires. “The fragility of a 3D printed garment is another thing to overcome,” she explained.

Looi chose not to reveal any details about her potentially groundbreaking collection, but promises it will be “even more spectacular then our last one.” Still, retail outlets are slow to adopt the groundbreaking tech, despite enthusiasm from designers. The acclaimed designer says no retail outlets have contacted her about selling her 3D-printed clothing yet, “but we do get a lot of inquiries from museum and exhibitors.” Emphasis on the yet: A spokesperson for MecklerMedia told Digital Trends the company has in fact received calls from retail chains interested in attending the show.

Other designers participating in the 3D Print Fashion Show have all had their hands in pushing this burgeoning industry. Andrew O’Mara helps 3D design custom footwear for startup Feetz, a company which turns photos of customer’s feet into individually customized 3D-printed shoes. Rachel Nhan, who has crafted 3D printed neckpieces, is assistant graphic designer at Aeropostale. Francis Bitonti runs a studio which produces 3D-printed jewelry, gowns, bags and accessories and describes itself as a “disruptive luxury brand.” Bitonti also holdswebinars on the 3D print process in fashion and is holding his next one on June 10 at 1 p.m. EST.

Rachel Nhan Neckpiece

For years, 3D print fashion has been on display. But Looi’s free-flowing gown could signal a path from the runway to your closet. With PayPal sponsoring this year’s Geek Picnic in Russia and Nike releasing its first 3D-printed Nike Football Rebento duffle bag, Mercurial FlyLite Guard and the Nike Vapor HyperAgility Cleat last summer, 3D print fashion may capture the funding needed to commercialize this revolution. It has certainly already captured the interest.

MecklerMedia’s inaugural 3D Print Fashion Show will take place April 16 at5:30pm at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City.

digitaltrends.com

by | April 7, 2015

 

Italian fashion wear

Breathing Life Into High Quality Italian Fashion Wear

http://www.cnet.com/news/multimaterial-3d-printing-brings-italian-fashion-to-life/

Gruppo Meccaniche Luciani has created a six-piece fashion collection built using multi-material 3D printing.
Multimaterial 3D printing is opening up a brave new world of fashion possibilities, and the Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 is leading the charge. Gruppo Meccaniche Luciani – a Corridonia, Italy-based manufacturer of moulds and other tools for making footwear – has designed a collection to showcase its new service called rapid prototyping.

“3D printing enables us to offer a new line of items to our clients. We can design and 3D print realistic prototypes in a matter of hours and incorporate any required design iterations before starting full production,” said Gruppo Meccaniche Luciani’s Elisa Luciani.

The collection consists of six items: thee pairs of shoes, a bustier, a bracelet and a rigid, single-material handbag, designed to showcase the intricate work that can be achieved with 3D printing – both with multiple materials, in different colours and textures, achieved with the printer’s triple-jet design; and in the complexity of the designs themselves.

The bustier features a cutout in the middle, bordered by black curves contrasted with a pointed prism pattern, and filled with curved lines, in a soft, flexible material – Stratasys’ family of rubber-like materials – that is more comfortable to wear than hard PLA material.

“Our main requirement was to produce a highly-detailed, realistic wearable. Using Stratasys’ materials, we were able to 3D print a top with varying levels of softness that could be worn in direct contact with the skin,” Luciani explained. “The ability to combine rigid and soft materials simultaneously is unique and would have otherwise entailed manual manufacture and individual assembly of each material.

Meanwhile, one of the pairs of shoes is printed in both rigid and soft materials in two colours for a visually compelling, brightly coloured look; another has a complex, angular latticed design, which fits around the curved shape of the shoe itself.

“When designing the shoe we were concerned about the rigidity and resistance of the heels, but the 3D printer’s ability to combine varying densities of rigid and soft material simultaneously enabled us to manufacture the whole shoe in one print,” Luciani said.

CNET.COM
by | March 9, 2015 10:58 PM PDT

3D printed dress

A Stylish and Seductive Self-Defense Ready Dress!

http://goo.gl/sc5Z2L

CES 2015: Self Defense Wearable Made Using 3D Printing

CES 2015: Self Defense Wearable Made Using 3D Printing

Dutch designer adds detection and defense devices to “Spiderdress” offering.

Wearable technology would handily win the title of Emerging Technology of 2014 if not for the existence of 3D printing. Both have leapt forward this year in terms of price, variety, media attention and public acceptance…and both are poised to take 2015 by storm. Dutch designer/engineer Anouk Wipprecht plans to introduce a wearable this January that may place wearables in pole position for next year’s race.

Wipprecht’s “Spiderdress” exemplifies the trend of wearable technology. It’s an article of clothing that integrates robotics and sensors to give the wearer capabilities she wouldn’t have otherwise. In this case, the charmingly creepy Spiderdress is a self-defense aid that applies two kinds of sensors. The first tracks and analyzes body language and behavior out to a range of seven meters. The second tracks respiration to check if that presence makes the wearer nervous. If so, it jabs the interloper with a plastic leg to not-so-subtly suggest he create some distance.

Spider Dress Black.png Spiderdress 3Dprinting

The 3D printed bodice of the dress is light enough to wear for an event, but not on a long trek. Its defensive arms are arrayed to look like its namesake arachnid, down to sensor pods designed to look like eyes.

Clothing like the Spiderdress refines the concept of self-defense and expands it with the new miniaturized devices and expanded capacity the wearables trend brings to the party.

This is not Wipprecht’s first foray into weird science clothing that seems like something out of a comic book. Other examples of her work include a dress that makes the wearer immune to electrocution and clothes that detect the wearer’s mood and display. The Spider Dress will be unveiled to the public at the 2015 CES Convention in Las Vegas on January 6-9.

PSFK.COM
by JASON BRICK | 9 JANUARY 2015

3D printed makeup!

Want any shade or colour of eye shadow, lip gloss, nail polish or lipstick? 3D printing will one day allow you to order makeup customised specifically for you! 🙂

http://theweek.com/…/how-3d-printed-makeup-is-changing-the-…

For many people of varying skin tones, finding the perfect shade of makeup is a near-impossible task. That’s why Grace Choi wants to give people the tools to create a customized line of makeup at home, using 3D printing technology.

Choi is the founder of Mink, a desktop 3D printer capable of creating any color of eye shadow, lipstick, lip gloss, and nail polish. Instead of using standard ink, Choi’s product uses FDA-compliant ingredients. Future iterations will be able to process foundations and face powder, too.

“Beauty is defined by the colors [big] companies choose to manufacture, which are the ones they think will sell and the ones we see on the models they select to represent their brands,” Choi said in an interview withForbes. “What if you want a color that you think is beautiful but the industry doesn’t? You can’t have it because you can’t control what the industry produces, and the most tragic thing about it all is that we don’t even question it. We have been trained so well by these companies that we blindly accept the narrow band of options in front of us.”

Not only does Choi’s device make women less reliant on the makeup industry — which consulting and marketing research firm Lucintel estimates will balloon to $265 billion globally by 2017 — it could potentially solve the problem many women of color face. Most off-the-shelf makeup is made with Caucasian faces in mind. As Rebecca Pahle ofThe Mary Sue pointed out, letting women choose the specific shades they find appealing will help limit the power the makeup industry has in defining which tones are considered attractive. This is important. As The Daily Beast reported, most major cosmetic brands have never featured an Asian model, except for Estee Lauder, which worked with Liu Wen in 2010. Letting women create their own colors gives them the power to say what they think beauty looks like.

That’s not to mention that if Choi’s product succeeds, it will make her one of the few female faces in the booming 3-D printing industry, which made $3.1 billion last year, according to a report by Wohlers Associates.

Choi said during her TechCrunch Disrupt presentation in May, where she first presented Mink, that she was inspired to create the device after becoming frustrated with the meager selection of mass-produced colors at drug stores, and having to go to expensive high-end stores like Sephora to buy specific shades that suited her. She wanted to give the power of selection to women instead of high-end corporations.

So how does it work? You simply snap a picture or take a screenshot of the hue you want and figure out its hex code by using a color picker. Then, using a photo-editing program, you enter the hex code in a new document, which will create a square of whatever color you want. Finally, you print the color out the same way you would print a document. However, instead of watching the printer spit out lines of text on a piece of paper, the 3D printer builds powder or cream in the shade you selected inside a special Mink container.

The device, which is expected to go to market later this year, will retail for around $300, while ink, substrates, and customized cases will be purchased separately. Considering that Mint.com reports that the average woman spends $15,000 on makeup during her lifetime, $300 seems like a bargain.

THEWEEK.COM
by Michelle Castillo | October 22, 2014

3D printed headdress!

3D printing helps create this headdress that responds to brain activity! 🙂

http://www.inside3dp.com/3d-printed-headdress-shows-brain-a…

3D printed headdress maps thoughts with color. Credit - Sensoree

3D printed headdress shows your brain activity

It looks like you’ve come straight out of the shower and have forgotten to rinse your head after shampooing, but it’s far more fascinating than that. A fashion designer has created a 3D printed headdress that indicates what parts of your brain are working, by flashing different colors and sectors.

NEUROTiQ is the brainchild of fashion designer Kristin Neidlinger, the founder of SENSOREE, who used 3D printing with EEG brain sensors to create this unusual head attire.

A 3D printed brain animating accessory

Neidlinger calls NEUROTiQ a ‘brain animating fashion item’, as it maps your thoughts and then translates them into different colors. For instance, red indicates deep sleep, orange shows a meditative state, and consciousness is yellow-green. A combined color display of blue, purple and red displays indicate multi-sensory gamma brain activity.

SENSOREE specialize in creating wearable technology with a difference. Their designs often include bio.media, which reveals something about the wearer that they themselves might not be aware of communicating.

Futuristic materials

To create these designs, Neidlinger chose futuristic materials and typically embeds them with bio sensory technology. This not only provides an emotionally based creation controlled by our bodies, but allows others to be aware of our most intimate feelings.

3D printed neuron globules embedded with bio.media . Credit: Sensoree

“I love materials,” Neidlinger told 3DPrint.com, “I am a tactile enthusiast and have always loved the qualities of textures and structures of shape. The NeurotiQ was my first work with 3D printing. It was a grand experiment with materials. Currently, 3D prints are solid objects and it is challenging to find comfort and movement on the body. The fashions are more like armor.”

Mapping the inner workings of the human brain

The headdress itself has been 3D printed as a knitted design, which could been seen as representing the complicated pattern of neurons and synapses within our own brain structure. Embedded within the 3D knit are small light points that respond to Emotiv Epoc EEG brain sensors called neuron globules.

There are 14 of these LED 3D printed globules, which once embedded into the nylon ‘wool’, then had to be hand knitted into the headdress. This, as you can imagine, was not simple task, and took 102 hours to complete.

“To make the forms flexible, I thought to combine traditional hand craft of knitting with the new technology of 3D printing,” said Neidlinger. “3D printing offers sculptural detail that is so fantastically intricate. I love the fact that you can dream up any design and make it tangible. The possibilities seem so vast – from designing jewelry to automated space stations, so why not space station jewelry? I am especially fond of working with Formlab’s Form 1 3D printer. The resolution is so fine and the resin has a nice capture of light. So far we are delighted and cannot wait to see what will happen on the runway!”

3D printed fashion fads?

MACHINIC, a San Francisco based digital prototyping and consulting company, helped Neidlinger with her NEUROTiQ headdress. Her colleagues at SENSOREE Grant Patterson and Nathan Tucker also lent a hand.

What's next for 3D printed fashion? Credit: Sensoree

The headdress made its debut at New York Fashion Week, where it was accompanied by other 3D printed designs, including several 3D printed dresses.

As for wearable technology, it appears that we are now becoming obsessed with creating items of clothing that reveal more than we could possibly say on any social media site. But when will it be enough, and is anyone apart from ourselves actually that interested?

inside3dp.com

by Janey Davies | Sep 26 2014 , 09:00:50

3D printed shoes for Miss America

Miss Georgia becomes the first Miss America hopeful to wear 3D printed shoes to the competition, putting wearable 3D printed flair on the map for such competitions!

http://www.cnet.com/…/miss-georgias-custom-heels-flaunt-3d…/

Shoes that look like a classic car? Georgia Tech industrial design students fashion a pair of high-tech shoes for their peer, Miss Georgia, inspired by the school’s Ford mascot.

3D-printed shoes have, until now, mostly been the stuff of art exhibits and fashion shows presaging a world in which we all look like we’re wearing alien life forms.

On Saturday, shoes molded by 3D printing got a far wider showing, parading along New Jersey’s Atlantic City boardwalk on the feet of Miss Georgia, Maggie Bridges.

At the traditional “Show Us Your Shoes” procession — where Miss America hopefuls wear fancy footwear honoring their home state — Bridges sported a pair of custom-engineered wedges inspired by the Ramblin’ Wreck, the 1930 Ford Model A Sport coupe that serves as student body mascot at Georgia Tech, where Bridges is a senior.

Georgia Tech industrial design students Maren Sonne, Jordan Thomas, and Julia Brooks fashioned the sparkly shoes, which feature a finely detailed laser-cut grille with 3D-printed headlights; a laser-cut black and gold pattern on the heels; and little 3D-printed wheels, complete with tread details, along the sides.

The trio originally considered designing a shoe that said science with every step. “We were looking at DNA strands and beakers used in chemistry and stuff,” Sonne says in a video about the design process. In the end, they opted for a distinctly recognizable Georgia Tech icon, the Ramblin’ Wreck.

It took the trio about four weeks and $400 to transform the $60 Moda wedges into wearable retro sports cars. The iconic white side bumpers proved the biggest challenge, Sonne told Crave.

“We could only bend them in the x/y axis so we had to make sure they fit the shoes prior to heating up the acrylic,” she said. “We made a template out of paper and fit it to the shoe (which took about 10 different templates) we then cut it out of acrylic and heated the material to fit it to the shoes.”

Bridges didn’t win the Miss America pageant Sunday — the title went to Miss New York. But she definitely walked away with one glittery prize — the first pair of Miss America shoes to feature 3D printing. “Maggie absolutely loved them,” Sonne reported, an observation echoed by Bridge, who wrote on a Facebook fan page that the students “knocked this out of the park” and created a “work of art.”

CNET.COM
by | September 15, 2014 3:10 PM PDT