3D printed eyelash curlers – something for ladies!

Ladies – Are You Frustrated With Your Eyelash Curlers? Look No Further.

http://techcrunch.com/2015/03/01/voir-creations/

This is an exhaustive solution to a (physically) small problem.

Biologist Adele Bakhtiarova had never been able to find an eyelash curler that fit her. She struggled with finding one that could reach out to the very last eyelashes on the edges of her eyes. She tried dozens of eyelash curlers. But they would pinch her skin or crimp the lashes into an ‘L’ shape instead of a proper curl.

So after working at Halcyon Molecular, a Founders Fund-backed startup that was trying to find a way to cheaply and quickly sequence the full human genome, she started working on a solution as a side project.

It was a 15-month endeavor. She learned how to design hardware in CAD, then found 3D-printing facilities in the East Bay to prototype some designs and built a mobile app.

The end result is $25 eyelash curler that she will 3D print to custom fit your eyes. It comes paired with a mobile app that you can use to scan your eye profile and then send data to her company Voir Creations, which will make a 3D model of your face. She’s currently in the process of raising $30,000 on Kickstarter to test if there’s consumer interest.

It may feel small. But more broadly speaking, there’s this question of whether 3D printing can usher in an era of mass customization.

We’ve seen a few beauty-related products already. Grace Choi debuted the Mink last year at TechCrunch Disrupt NY. It’s a printer that will make your own custom shades of make-up. I’ve also written about more serious, custom-printed health care products like YC-backed Standard Cyborg, which incorporates 3D printing into making custom fit prosthetic legs.

SOCIAL.TECHCRUNCH.COM
by  | Mar 1, 2015
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3D printing helped with facial defect

3D Printing Has Another Positive Impact on a Child’s Life

http://goo.gl/3GZNgy

Check out this excellent story about a little girl named Violet born with a rare defect, a Tessier facial cleft, that left a fissure in her skull, and how 3D-printing is helping doctors take on these kinds of complicated surgeries. The piece is in today’s The New York Times and written by health reporter and CommonHealth contributor Karen Weintraub, who offers a little background:

Violet Pietrok was born nearly two years ago without a nose. Her eyes were set so far apart that her mom compared her vision to a bird of prey’s. There was a gap in the skull behind her forehead.

There was no question she would need drastic surgery to lead a normal life. But few surgeons have seen patients with problems as complex as Violet’s. Her parents, Alicia Taylor and Matt Pietrok, who live near Salem, Oregon, brought her to Boston Children’s Hospital, to Dr. John Meara, who had operated before on kids with Tessier facial clefts.

As part of Children’s Pediatric Simulator Program, Meara was able to get several 3D printed models made of Violet’s skull. By handling and slicing up the models, he got a better sense of what had gone wrong and how best to fix it.

Such 3D-printing is becoming more commonplace in complex surgeries, allowing doctors views and knowledge they can’t get on their screens.

From the Times story:

Such 3-D-printed models are transforming medical care, giving surgeons new perspectives and opportunities to practice, and patients and their families a deeper understanding of complex procedures. Hospitals are also printing training tools and personalized surgical equipment. Someday, doctors hope to print replacement body parts.

“There’s no doubt that 3-D printing is going to be disruptive medicine,” said Dr. Frank J. Rybicki, chief of medical imaging at the Ottawa Hospital and chairman and professor of radiology at the University of Ottawa. He is the former director of the applied imaging science lab at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a few blocks from Boston Children’s.

“It makes procedures shorter, it improves your accuracy,” said Dr. Rybicki, who has used 3-D printing in his work with face transplants. “When bioprinting actually hits, it will change everything.”

For now, the printer extrudes a layer of liquid plastic instead of ink. It adds a second layer, and then another, and a skull or rib cage — or whatever the surgeon dials up — slowly emerges.

The same process can also print layers of human cells. So far, researchers have also printed blood vessels, simple organs and bits of bone.

COMMONHEALTH.WBUR.ORG
by Rachel Zimmerman | 

3D printed artworks

From Lamps shaped like Mushroom Clouds to a rendition of Michelangelo’s ‘David’ with Flowers, Feast Your Eyes on this list of the Top Ten 3D Printed Art!

http://3dprint.com/34900/10-cool-3d-printed-artworks/

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Mushroom chairs, nuclear cloud lamps, eerie ghost-like trapped creatures, beautiful shell-cone objects, and stag’s and futuristic human heads, are all featured as some of the coolest pieces of 3D printed art we’ve seen yet.

3D printed art has unique details, with 3D printing allowing for the kind of subtlety and nuance of detail that requires much less handicraft time than conventional sculpture. This list represents a range of styles, textures, and functions; some beautiful and organic, other witty or humorous, and yet others introspective, eerie, and even unnerving.  Enjoy!

1.  Shane Hope: “Public Panopticon Powder”

In Shane Hope’s piece, he combines nano-structural, or small scale structural, reliefs that are first 3D printed and then painted to “reconcile the parts seamlessly.” From a great distance the work, “Public Panopticon Powder,” looks almost like an Impressionist painting, but up close it resembles barnacle pieces of coral reef.  The work is part of his series “Species-Tool-Being”; the rest of the series can be found here.

2. Eric Klarenbeek, “Mycelium Chair”

chair

Not only is Eric Klarenbeek’s “Mycelium Chair” also inspired by organic elements — it features mushrooms. In this piece that looks like something you may find in the same magical other world where Nuala O’Donovan’s (see above, “Teasel Grey Fault Line”) work resides. Maybe not so comfortable to sit in, Klarenbeek‘s chair shows how 3D printing can use natural elements to enhance the message of  a work.

3. Valeriya Promokhova, “7 Davids Project: in Flowers”

michel

While there’s some incredibly unique 3D printed art, there’s also some more knock off work that this next series seems to epitomize. Recognize this sculpture? It’s Michelangelo’s “David” reworked in a 3D Printed Cat sponsored series entitled “7 Davids,” by designer Valeriya Promokhova. This piece is done “in Flowers,” and the series also includes printings in spirals, splines, curves, and other designs.

3D printing is allowing people to create images and objects that may have been previously difficult to capture. In this case, this Beijing artist creates haunting and sometimes terrifying works by layering glass panes to create a three dimensional effect. Some of his work looks like people are drowning or trying to escape another dimension — as this one does. Others can be described as ghost-apocalyptic, as the subjects represented appear to have endured harrowing events. This is certainly some of the more thoughtful 3D printed work out there.

4. Veneridesign Studio, “Nuke Lamp”

nuke

If the previous piece seems eerily post-apocalyptic, this one is definitely mid-apocalyptic. Nothing says “end of the world” better than this 3D printed nuclear lamp cloud designed by Veneridesign Studio. Over the years, we have seen so many different versions of the mushroom cloud: why not make it functional by using it as a lamp?

5. Eric van Straaten, “Groomer”

head2

For some reason, heads and busts are big in 3D printed art, and the first one we feature here in our series of 3D printed head art is really surreal and kind of unnerving. The next artist, Eric van Straaten, describes his work as  embodying “weirdly eroticized corporeality”: and weird is right. Young nudish swimmers laying on top of an older man’s head, forming a makeshift swim cap, can only be interpreted as a clash between youth and age, revealed in the focus on the physical aging of the man’s body. What’s important to note is how the materials used mimic real skin. This 3D printed sculpture is definitely over most of our heads!

6. Monika Horčicová, “The Wheel of Life”

wheel

This last piece is a wheel made up of skeleton legs that has a very pretty appearance from afar, but on closer inspection it presents a macabre, yet still thoughtful, feel. Done as 3D print artist Monika Horčicová’s Bachelor’s Thesis, “The Wheel of Life” reminds us that the future of 3D art is in good hands, and life is too short not to enjoy some of it today.

What do you think about these pieces? Let us know your favorite — of these, or all time! — piece of 3D printed artwork over in the 3D Printed Art forum thread at 3DPB.com.

art

3DPRINT.COM
by  | JANUARY 12, 2015

The recovery of vision thanks to 3D printing!

3D printed bionic eyes; providing vision to those that once had and lost it! Follow the link below to learn more! 🙂

http://3dprint.com/24398/3d-printed-bionic-eye/

bioniceye-projet1200

3D Printing is such an amazing technology. I can’t emphasize it enough. Each and every day I am surprised by the ways in which this technology is being used. As a journalist covering 3D printing news on a daily basis, there are days when I get goosebumps on my arms just writing a story, while other days I am presented with material that can be quite humorous. One thing is for sure though; I never have a boring day.

Today, in preparation for covering this particular story, I actually had tears come to my eyes; the very eyes, that thanks to my contact lenses, have nearly 20/20 vision, and the very eyes that many of us take for granted. Unfortunately, not everyone can see with clarity. There are those who have lost their eyesight almost completely due to macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, or some other condition or events. These people only wish that they could one day see again.

Thanks to researchers at the Bionics Institute, 3D Systems’ ProJet 1200 3D printers and a company called evok3d, some of these people may one day get their vision back . Researchers have been working for several years on what they call a ‘bionic eye’, which aims to provide new vision to those suffering from retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. In order for a patient to see results from this device, which remains in its testing stages, they will need to still have some remaining retinal ganglion cells, a healthy optic nerve and visual cortex, and they must at one point in their lives have had the ability to see.

bioniceye1

The bionic eye has already been tested on a select few individuals and it has been shown to work. It is able to provide enhanced vision to those experiencing both partial and total vision loss.

In order to generate the prototypes for these bionic eyes, as well as the molds used to create the silicon version, the Bionics Institute has been utilizing a ProJet 1200 3D printer, with help from evok3d, which specializes in 3D printing, scanning, and advanced additive manufacturing technology.

The Prototype

Associate Professor and Senior Research Fellow at the Bionics Institute Chris Williams has been tasked with using the ProJet 1200 printer in order to create verification models which are used to test for functionality, fit, and size. They also use the printers to create pre-production molds from the models which they use to cast silicon prototypes.

“We can now get a prototype out in 4 hours using the ProJet 1200,” explains Williams. “Before 3D printing it would take us weeks or months. We found it takes 20 iterations to reach an upgrade, in terms of going through iterations, the machine justified itself in the first week.”

These bionic eyes have been researched and worked on for 10 years now, and just recently, thanks to the precision and efficiency of 3D printing technology, the first clinical trials have been completed.

The bionic vision system includes a camera which transmits radio signals to a microchip in the back of the eye. These signals are then converted into electrical impulses, which are able to stimulate cells in the retina and connect to the optic nerve. They are then transferred to the vision processing areas of the brain, where they can be interpreted as an image which the patient can see. With the current prototypes, patients don’t exactly see the same way that we do. Instead they see blob-like shapes and lights, but the technology has proven to work in allowing blind individuals to walk around unassisted.

bioniceye2

While the technology still has a ways to go before we see it hit mainstream use, there is an extraordinary amount of hope for those who have unfortunately lost their eyesight, thanks to the Bionic Institute, those individuals involved in the project, 3D printing, and evok3d.

“It was quite promising, their vision was optimized, obviously they want better vision and fully wireless power, but the eye surgeons were pleased with the process and that’s a platform for future trials,” Williams said.

What do you think about this incredible use of 3D printing to fabricate working prototypes for the creation of bionic eyes? Discuss in the 3D printed bionic eye forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3DPRINT.COM
by  | NOVEMBER 24, 2014

3D printed food for soldiers!

Feeling Hungry? Check out what’s on the menu for the future soldiers of America!

http://www.npr.org/…/361187352/army-eyes-3d-printed-food-fo…

Army researchers will try to find ways to 3-D print nutritious food with less heavy packaging than the current military meals.

Army scientists have spent decades concocting meals that last without refrigeration and survive high-altitude airdrops. And now, the Army is eyeing a new form of cooking: 3-D printing! Yes, food that comes fresh out of a printer, for our troops.

Lauren Oleksyk, a food technologist leading the team at the Army’s Natick research center, lays out the vision.

Imagine soldiers who are strapped, head to toe, with sensors that measure if they’re high or low in potassium or cholesterol.

“We envision to have a 3-D printer that is interfaced with the soldier. And that sensor can deliver information to the computer software,” Oleksyk says. “And then they would be able to have either powdered or liquid matrices that are very nutrient dense, that they have on demand that they can take and eat immediately to fill that need.”

“Liquid matrices” that are nutrient “dense.” And you print them?!

You read that right.

The Army is turning to 3-D printers for many purposes, including a nutrition project — to stamp out the equivalent of PowerBars, but personalized for the battlefield.

The Department of Defense has just approved research funding. And it’s going to take a lot of research. While regular printers put ink on paper, 3-D printers blast liquids and powders into complex shapes. But it’s not clear if printers could mold a solid like carrots — and what would happen to the food’s nutritional value.

“There’s synthetic types of meats, there’s real beef, there’s real meat,” Oleksyk says. “And we would see what that does in the printing process to that protein, whether it’s animal based or plant based.” She’s talking about this research with the MIT Lincoln Lab and NASA too.

Of course, the 3-D food will have to pass a taste test, just like the current rations — which are called MREs, or meals ready to eat.

Oleksyk mailed me a bunch to sample. I try a jalapeno pepper jack-flavored patty. It is full of flavor, and also very processed, like someone had to jam a lot into a little patty.

The kitchens that make this patty use flaming hot ovens and extreme heat to sterilize it. Oleksyk says if 3-D printers could use less heat, the patty could also taste better — less like a compact muscle and more like fresh ground meat.

“We hope so! It’s not being done, so it’s something that we will investigate in our project,” she says.

In the food world, 3-D printing is just getting started — and it’s a sweet start, literally.

Liz von Hasseln is giving me an online video tour of The Sugar Lab, a 3-D printing outfit in Los Angeles that turns sugar into sweet candy sculptures for wedding cakes and fancy cocktails. The startup was acquired by 3D Systems, which is sharing its technology with the military in informal talks.

She points to a printer that’s the size of an industrial photocopier and explains, “What the printer does is, a lot like making frosting in a bowl, it basically adds the wet ingredients of the frosting to the dry ingredients very, very precisely in very fine layers.”

Von Hasseln sent me some samples to try — and they’re very different from the military food. I unwrap a delicate sphere that’s a little bigger than a lollipop. It tastes like Sweet Tarts.

It’s hard for me to imagine this technology producing anything nutritious or durable. But von Hasseln husband, Kyle, co-founder of The Sugar Lab, says the printer’s ability to vary textures — to make food soft or hard — would be critical for soldiers who are injured or on the move.

“Dialing in the exact density of food could mean that they could eat more easily and because of that, as a consequence, they might even eat more or be healthier,” he says.

3-D printed food sounds sci-fi. But according to military scientists and 3-D experts, these meals for soldiers are on track to be ready by 2025.

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