Tampa library building and 3D printing

http://www.tampabay.com/news/education/college/usf-tampa-library-building-on-once-exotic-3-d-printing-technology/2222371

USF, Tampa library building on once-exotic 3-D printing technology (w/video)

TAMPA — For many, a scene on Grey’s Anatomy involving a 3-D printer may have been their first exposure to a seemingly futuristic technology that is in widespread use right now around Tampa Bay.

The use of 3-D printers has grown steadily since the 1980s, when they were used almost exclusively in large government labs. These days, you can drop by the main branch of the Tampa Public Library and try it out for yourself.

Students and faculty at the University of South Florida are taking advantage of the extensive possibilities of 3-D printing. And a number of Tampa Bay businesses such as Engineering and Manufacturing Services and Tangible Labs are turning profits using high-end, commercial printers to mass produce such items as medical devices, military equipment and prototypes.

Increasingly, you can even do 3-D printing at home, with devices that used to carry a price tag of thousands of dollars now costing as little as a few hundred at Best Buy and Staples.

In 1914, a fire burned down the original dorm at the site of the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, killing at least six children and two staff members. No blueprints or photos of the building remain, presenting a big problem for researchers who wanted to understand how the fire spread.

With the help of Howard Kaplan at USF’s Advanced Visualization Center, lead Dozier researcher Erin Kimmerle used descriptions from Jackson County residents and former school staffers to build a 3-D printed model of what the school would have looked like.

“I think it gave a common vocabulary to the physical properties of the school,” Kaplan said. “From there, we can continue research on it and continue changing the digital model, reprinting parts that we need if we find new witness testimony that says otherwise.”

The 3-D model allowed researchers to also test different scenarios of where the fire was said to have started and how it spread.

Stories like those are no longer uncommon at USF.

In several university departments, 3-D printing technology has implanted itself into cross-disciplinary research: engineering students work with USF Health researchers to create models of hearts with birth defects from CT scans; architecture students create to-scale, 3-D printed models of entire cities. Even fine arts students are using the technology to 3-D print their digital sculptures.

In the John F. Germany Public Library in downtown Tampa, families, techies and aspiring entrepreneurs are seeing this developing technology up close.

In November, library staff unveiled the Hive, a multimedia and technology hub nestled on the third floor. The Hive boasts two mid-level 3-D printers in addition to a recording studio, an art center and a robotics center.

Classes using freely available 3-D modeling software are taught weekly to Hillsborough County residents, and staff members encourage them to use what they learn and take advantage of the free 3-D printing.

Hillsborough County and Friends of the Library fully fund the Hive, offering four hours of 3-D printing per month at no cost.

Principal librarian Megan Danak said the 3-D printers attract a lot of attention.

“We work with the everyday users off the street and people who want different levels of what they want to do with 3-D printing,” she said. “Some people just want to make little trinkets, but some want to make prototypes or print pieces for their model cars and at-home products.”

Printers used at the Hive have become the standard in consumer-level and at-home 3-D printing.

The Hive provides hourlong courses in some of the more user-friendly and free 3-D software such as Tinkercad and Blender, allowing students to tinker with their creations at home.

Library technical assistant and Hive staffer Taynisha Berengher said she is surprised most by how quickly young people are picking up on the technology.

“We’ve had kids as young as 9 or 10 years old blow us away with what they can create after a class or two,” she said.

The Hive has also worked with some young entrepreneurs looking to create prototypes of their new inventions.

In addition to The Hive, groups of tech-savvy and creative individuals have created what they call “hackerspaces” to pool money for 3-D printers and other technologies, as well as to share ideas and knowledge. They fund the purchase of printers through memberships to the hackerspace.

Groups such as Tampa Hackerspace and St. Pete Makers, which just recently entered the hackerspace scene, hold classes for members and the public to learn about 3-D printing and software.

Even if the technology remains more popular commercially and within the confines of research, USF’s Kaplan said the technology will ultimately have a huge impact on the everyday lives of consumers — from 3-D printed medical devices, bio-printed organs and a more tactile and visual education experience.

“People come and tell me all the time, ‘Oh, did you see Grey’s Anatomy? They’re printing body parts,’ ” Kaplan said. “We’re not there yet, but there’s a lot of things in the future of 3-D printing to be excited for.”

High school students demonstrate the use of 3D printers, including one by Ultimaker, at the 2015 CeBIT technology trade fair on March 16 in Hanover, Germany.

tampabay.com

by Roberto Roldan, Times Correspondent | Sunday, March 22, 2015 7:23pm

3D printed makeup!

Want any shade or colour of eye shadow, lip gloss, nail polish or lipstick? 3D printing will one day allow you to order makeup customised specifically for you! 🙂

http://theweek.com/…/how-3d-printed-makeup-is-changing-the-…

For many people of varying skin tones, finding the perfect shade of makeup is a near-impossible task. That’s why Grace Choi wants to give people the tools to create a customized line of makeup at home, using 3D printing technology.

Choi is the founder of Mink, a desktop 3D printer capable of creating any color of eye shadow, lipstick, lip gloss, and nail polish. Instead of using standard ink, Choi’s product uses FDA-compliant ingredients. Future iterations will be able to process foundations and face powder, too.

“Beauty is defined by the colors [big] companies choose to manufacture, which are the ones they think will sell and the ones we see on the models they select to represent their brands,” Choi said in an interview withForbes. “What if you want a color that you think is beautiful but the industry doesn’t? You can’t have it because you can’t control what the industry produces, and the most tragic thing about it all is that we don’t even question it. We have been trained so well by these companies that we blindly accept the narrow band of options in front of us.”

Not only does Choi’s device make women less reliant on the makeup industry — which consulting and marketing research firm Lucintel estimates will balloon to $265 billion globally by 2017 — it could potentially solve the problem many women of color face. Most off-the-shelf makeup is made with Caucasian faces in mind. As Rebecca Pahle ofThe Mary Sue pointed out, letting women choose the specific shades they find appealing will help limit the power the makeup industry has in defining which tones are considered attractive. This is important. As The Daily Beast reported, most major cosmetic brands have never featured an Asian model, except for Estee Lauder, which worked with Liu Wen in 2010. Letting women create their own colors gives them the power to say what they think beauty looks like.

That’s not to mention that if Choi’s product succeeds, it will make her one of the few female faces in the booming 3-D printing industry, which made $3.1 billion last year, according to a report by Wohlers Associates.

Choi said during her TechCrunch Disrupt presentation in May, where she first presented Mink, that she was inspired to create the device after becoming frustrated with the meager selection of mass-produced colors at drug stores, and having to go to expensive high-end stores like Sephora to buy specific shades that suited her. She wanted to give the power of selection to women instead of high-end corporations.

So how does it work? You simply snap a picture or take a screenshot of the hue you want and figure out its hex code by using a color picker. Then, using a photo-editing program, you enter the hex code in a new document, which will create a square of whatever color you want. Finally, you print the color out the same way you would print a document. However, instead of watching the printer spit out lines of text on a piece of paper, the 3D printer builds powder or cream in the shade you selected inside a special Mink container.

The device, which is expected to go to market later this year, will retail for around $300, while ink, substrates, and customized cases will be purchased separately. Considering that Mint.com reports that the average woman spends $15,000 on makeup during her lifetime, $300 seems like a bargain.

THEWEEK.COM
by Michelle Castillo | October 22, 2014

First 3D printed knee for cat!

Cyrano the cat gets a second chance to be able to use a leg deteriorated from bone cancer again, with the help of the first 3D printed knee joint ever made for cats! 🙂

http://www.engineering.com/…/3D-Printing-Creates-the-Worlds…

3D printing, medicine, cat, surgery

A Weighty Dilemma

It’s the kind of diagnosis you dread. When Cyrano developed bone cancer in his left hind leg, his owners wanted to get him the best treatment possible to bring him back to full health. After successful radiation treatment that eliminated the tumour, Cyrano went into full remission. Unfortunately, because of the invasive nature of the cancer, Cyrano was left with bone deterioration in his distal femur and he was unable to use his painful knee joint. In cases like this, surgeons normally choose to amputate the affected limb; however, at 26 lbs, Cyrano wouldn’t be able to support his weight with only three legs. Undeterred, Cyrano’s owners enlisted the help of experienced veterinary surgeon and orthopaedic specialist Dr Denis Marcellin-Little and his long-time collaborator Ola Harrysson, Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering at North Carolina State University to create a custom solution for their beloved pet.

Getting Cyrano Back on His Feet

3D printing, medicine, cat, surgery

Dr Marcellin-Little and Prof Harrysson have worked with Materialise using Additive Manufacturing in surgeries for over 10 years. With amputation out of consideration, they felt that 3D Printing could provide an ideal solution for Cyrano because of its ability to create small but detailed parts to exacting specifications. Cyrano would thus become one of the very first cats to receive a miniature, limb-sparing total knee arthroplasty. Starting with CT scans of both hind legs, Dr Marcellin-Little and Prof Harrysson used Materialise’s Mimics Innovation Suite to generate accurate 3D models of Cyrano’s leg. Adapting the design of a knee implant used in dogs, in collaboration with BioMedtrix, an animal implant company, they then created a miniature implant that fit to the exact anatomical structure of Cyrano’s leg, and the surgical plan needed to successfully realize the procedure. Because of the small size of the bones, the integrated ability of the Mimics Innovation Suite to engineer parts on a personalised anatomical model facilitated a process that would have otherwise been extremely difficult to manage and perform accurately.

Building Strength and Integration Features Into Implants

Knowing the bone structure around the joint was weak, the implant was designed with stems that would anchor it into the bones. Materialise technology partner EOS then printed the implant using cobalt chromium, a metal strong enough to support Cyrano’s weight and the wear and tear that daily use would exert on the thin parts. Building the implant by Direct Metal Laser Sintering meant that mesh and porous areas that would promote integration of the implant into the bone could also be built into the piece as it was being created. These features, only achievable using Additive Manufacturing, provide enhanced long-term stability over traditional implants, giving surgeons a new option for non-standard cases such as Cyrano’s that can be tailored exactly to their needs. Since his surgery Cyrano has returned to his family, and although he now walks with a limp, he can move freely again with full use of his joint. With 3D Printing now entering the veterinary realm, cats are one step closer to experiencing their full nine lives.

References:

3D printing used in Opel cars

Take a look at how Opel are using 3D printing to make life at their assembly plants cheaper yet better!

http://www.engineering.com/…/Tools-from-3D-Printer-Make-Car…

opel, jigs, fixture, automotive

For some, it may still seem like a long way off, but it’s already part of everyday life at Opel: assembly tools produced by a 3D printer are an increasingly important part of the production process. A six-strong team led by Virtual Simulation Engineer Sascha Holl prints plastic assembly tools in Rüsselsheim which are used in Opel manufacturing plants across Europe. Cheaper and quicker to produce, these tools are being used at Eisenach for the assembly of the ADAM and its new ADAM ROCKS stable-mate. And this is just the beginning – Opel experts predict the use of tools from a 3D printer will continue to grow. “In the future, more and more 3D assembly tools will be integrated into the production process,” says Sascha Holl.

For production of the ADAM ROCKS, to be launched in September, the Eisenach carmakers use an assembly jig – a specific, fixed frame – made by a 3D printer to produce the vehicle name logotype on the side window. And for the windshield, a 3D-printed inlet guide is also used to simplify the mounting process and help ensure a precise alignment. Other tools from the printer are used to fasten the chrome step plate on ADAM ROCKS door openings and install the standard Swing Top canvas roof. Around 40 such assembly aids and jigs are used in Eisenach.

This equipment was developed on the computer during the development phase of ADAM ROCKS. “It enables us to quickly adapt the parts. If something changes on the vehicle, we can easily modify the tool with just a few clicks,” explains Holl. “The 3D printing process enables us to produce every imaginable form and shape. Unlike conventional manufacturing technology, we don’t have to accept any limitations.”

The Virtual Engineering Team in Rüsselsheim only has to reach into their bag of tricks when it comes to the maximum size of parts built. Using sophisticated technology to join a number of smaller elements, it is possible to produce larger parts. For instance, when developing an assembly aid for the side sill or the rear spoiler of ADAM ROCKS.

During 3D printing, plastic is melted and laid down in successive layers, each just 0.25 mm thick. The plastic used is light, robust and versatile. Hollow spaces and overhangs are automatically treated with a filling material, which is later washed away in a type of dishwasher. “The process is comparable to bridge or balustrade construction,” says Holl. “There high or protruding elements must also be shored up and supported until everything has hardened off. Only then is the supporting framework removed.”

The small number of jigs required in final assembly was previously made by hand in an elaborate process using a milled cast and resin. Thanks to 3D printing, the production cost of these aids is now reduced by up to 90 percent. In addition, the printed tools are ready to use after just about eight hours, and are up to 70 percent lighter in weight. Another advantage is that these aids can be mechanically and chemically processed. For example, they can be drilled, milled, sanded, varnished and bonded, or connected and combined with various other materials. Ergonomic fine-tuning can also be carried out on a PC in a matter of minutes. “We can adapt the tools for each assembly situation, as well as make them user-friendly for our colleagues on the line,” adds Holl.

Production of the Opel Insignia and Cascada convertible also benefits from 3D printer tools, which will be introduced step-by-step for the assembly of other Opel models. The new Corsa, Vivaro and Mokka, which will begin rolling off the assembly lines in Zaragoza later this year, will be among models built with the help of tools from a 3D printer. Their increasing use makes Opel a leader in this field within the GM Group.

References:

ENGINEERING.COM
by http://www.engineering.com/Author/ID/8/TheEngineer | August 21, 2014