3D printed “photosynthetic wearable”

http://www.dezeen.com/2015/06/01/neri-oxman-3d-printing-photosynthetic-wearable-host-living-organisms-mit-mediated-matter/

Neri Oxman 3D prints “photosynthetic wearable” to host living organisms

Designer and researcher Neri Oxman has successfully 3D-printed one of her“wearable skins” and filled its hollow tubes with a luminescent liquid to represent how it could host photosynthetic organisms (+ slideshow).

During a TED talk in Vancouver earlier this year, Oxman demonstrated that she and members of the Mediated Matter group at MIT Media Lab were able to produce Mushtari – one of four wearable pieces in her Wanderers range.

The wearable structures in the collection were designed to facilitate synthetic biological processes that might one day allow humans to travel to and survive on other planets.

Using triple-jet technology supplied by 3D-printing company Stratasys, the team was able to create the sculpture in one piece from a combination of different plastic materials that produced various densities and transparencies.

“This is the first time that 3D-printing technology has been used to produce a photosynthetic wearable piece with hollow internal channels designed to house microorganisms,” said Oxman.

Neri Oxman's photosynthetic wearable

The structure’s series of channels are designed to allow liquid to flow through. The idea is that they could house photosynthetic organisms, which would generate energy from light and somehow pass this onto the garment’s wearer.

“Inspired by the human gastrointestinal tract, Mushtari is designed to host synthetic microorganisms – a co-culture of photosynthetic cyanobacteria and E. coli bacteria – that can fluoresce bright colours in darkness and produce sugar or biofuels when exposed to the sun.”

“Such functions will, in the near future, augment the wearer by scanning our skins, repairing damaged tissue and sustaining our bodies, an experiment that has never been attempted before,” she added.

The 58 metres of fluid channels that are wound within the structure have an inner-channel diameter ranging from 1 millimetre to 2.5 centimetres.

Neri Oxman's photosynthetic wearable

Translucent and transparent sections of the tubes allow light to penetrate into the interior so the organisms could use it to photosynthesise.

Oxman’s team has managed to flow liquid containing cyanobacteria – bacteria that obtain energy through photosynthesis – through a small section of the tubes. The team has not yet demonstrated that the bacteria can photosynthesise while inside the structure, but is continuing to test the compatibility of the printed materials with the microorganisms.

“In the end, it is clear that the incorporation of synthetic biology in 3D-printed products for wearable microbiomes will enable the transition from designs that are inspired by nature, to designs made with and by nature, to, possibly designing nature herself,” Oxman said.

References:

dezeen.com

Neri Oxman 3D prints “photosynthetic wearable” to host living organisms

Morality of 3D printing’s future

Superstar Will.i.am Asks a Few Questions About the Morality of 3D Printing’s Future

http://www.dezeen.com/2015/03/06/will-i-am-interview-future-3d-printing-people/

Will.i.am

Will.i.am has called for “new morals, new laws and new codes” for 3D printing, a technology he says is evolving so rapidly that we will soon be able to print humans (+ interview).

Speaking to Dezeen at the launch of his Ekocycle range of sustainable lifestyle products yesterday, the music producer and Black Eyed Peas frontman said that we will be 3D-printing entire people in “our lifetime”.

“Eventually 3D printing will print people,” said Will.i.am. “I’m not saying I agree with it, I’m just saying what’s fact based on plausible growth in technology.”

“Unfortunately that is the reality, but at the same time it pushes humanity to have to adhere to new responsibilities,” he said. “So new morals, new laws and new codes are going to have to be implemented. Humans – as great as we are – are pretty irresponsible. Ask the planet. Ask the environment.”

Will.i.am is chief creative officer of 3D-printing company 3D Systems and has just launched his Ekocycle collection with Coca-Cola at London department store Harrods. Items in the range – which encompasses clothing, bicycles and luggage – are all made from waste materials, including 3D-printer filament produced from recycled plastic bottles.

Will-i-am-Ekocycle-3D-printer_dezeen

Researchers have already used 3D-printing technology to produce prototype organs using living cells. Experts predict that the ability to print complete human tissues is less than 10 years away.

“If you can print a liver or a kidney, god dang it, you’re going to be able to print a whole freaking person,” said Will.i.am. “Now we’re getting into a whole new territory. Moses comes down with the 10 commandments and says ‘Thou shalt not…’. He didn’t say shit about 3D printing.”

“When you have god-like tools, who’s governing me? I don’t know. I could create life. So new codes and morals – beyond laws – something has to be instilled into us. Before, when it was time to reproduce you had to mate. But now…”

He also believes that 3D printing will one day evolve into Star Trek-esque teleportation.

“You’re starting with beef, and leathers, and body parts, eventually it will get more complex,” he said. “It’s basically ‘Beam me up, Scotty’, a 3D printer that disintegrates the source.”

Will.i.am has launched a series of design- and tech-focussed initiatives in the past year, including a smartwatch designed with architect Zaha Hadid and an eyewear range with fashion designer George Garrow.

He is one of a number of well-known musicians that are making the leap into the design and technology industries, including Kanye Westand Pharrell Williams who both recently released clothing and footwear collections with sports brand Adidas.

“Musicians will be taken seriously when their business sells seriously,” said Will.i.am. “When you have serious partners and the products make serious money. Or when your products have serious design features that render it sustainable and they don’t break.”

“You can’t demand that because your famous, everyone’s supposed to like what you’re passionate about,” he continued. “No bro, you have to earn it. Just like the designers earned their respect. Just like you earned your respect as a musician, you have to earn it, it doesn’t just come.”

Will.i.am’s Ekocycle range is now available from a dedicated shop-in-shop on the third floor of Harrods.

Here’s the transcript of our interview with Will.i.am:

Dan Howarth: How is 3D printing going to change?

Will.i.am: I’m going to say something controversial. Eventually 3D-printing will print people. That’s scary. I’m not saying I agree with it, I’m just saying what’s fact based on plausible growth in technology and Moore’s law.

So right now we can print in post-consumer plastics, which is awesome. We can print in aluminium, which is bigger machines and awesome. We can print in titanium, which is pretty freaking crazy and amazing. We can print in steel, which is freaking hardcore. You can print in chocolate, and that’s sweet. You can print in freaking protein, you can make freaking meat. You can print leather. You can print a liver.

So if you can print a liver or a kidney. God dang it, you’re going to be able to print a whole freaking person. And that’s scary. That’s when it’s like, whah! And I’m not saying I agree, but plausible growth would say that with multiple machines that print in different materials, you could print in protein an aluminium combo.

Dan Howarth: How far away from that are we?

Will.i.am: Our lifetime. That’s scary. So unfortunately that is the reality, but at the same time it pushes humanity to have to adhere to new responsibilities, new morals. New lessons are going to have to be implemented. For real. Now we’re getting into a whole new territory. I don’t know what year it was, Moses comes down with the 10 commandments and says “Thou shalt not…” He didn’t say shit about 3D printing.

So new morals, new laws and new codes are going to have to be implemented. Humans – as great as we are – are pretty irresponsible. Ask the planet. Ask the environment.

Dan Howarth: So you think we’re going to need a whole set of laws to regulate what we 3D print?

Will.i.am: Morals, ethics, codes. Laws means someone governs. When you have god-like tools, who’s governing me? I don’t know. I could create life. So new codes and morals – beyond laws. Something has to be instilled into us. We’re going to a place we’ve never been before. We made a Will, we made a car, we made a house, we made a boat, we made flying machines. Before, when it was time to reproduce you had to mate. But now…

You’re starting with beef, and leathers, and body parts. Eventually it will get more complex. It’s basically “Beam me up, Scotty”, a 3D printer that disintegrates the source. Star Trek is pretty cool, because they had things like iPhones, and the internet. They also had 3D printers, that was “beam me up, Scotty”. Teleportation.

Dan Howarth: A number of musicians have transitioned into product and fashion design over the past few years. Do you think they’re taken seriously enough in the design industry?

Will.i.am: Musicians will be taken seriously when their business sells seriously. When you have serious partners and the products make serious money. Or when your products have serious design features that render it sustainable and they don’t break. More importantly, it’s successful in business.

Just like anybody jumping different careers. Say for example Bill Gates was the most amazing guitarist in the world, and he came up there and ripped it, with the facial expressions and everything. It would take you a long time to take Bill Gates seriously as a musician. The more he focuses and believes in it – the test of time will make you see him as a genius if he truly was an amazing guitarist.

Unfortunately those are the laws, and if he truly believes he will understand that. You can’t demand that because your famous, everyone’s supposed to like what you’re passionate about. No bro, you have to earn it. Just like the designers earned their respect. Just like you earned your respect as a musician, you have to earn it, it doesn’t just come.

References:

3D printed food which grows itself!

It’s Alive! 3D Printed Food Which Grows Itself

http://www.dezeen.com/…/movie-3d-printed-food-living-organ…/

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

Food designer Chloé Rutzerveld has developed a concept for “healthy and sustainable” 3D-printed snacks that sprout plants and mushrooms for flavour.

Rutzerveld‘s Edible Growth project consists of 3D-printed shapes containing a mixture of seeds, spores and yeast, which will start to grow after only a few days.

“Edible growth is exploring how 3D printing could transform the food industry,” she says in the movie. “It is about 3D printing with living organisms, which will develop into a fully grown edible.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

Each of the basket-like 3D-printed structures, which Rutzerveld presented at Dutch Design Week 2014, contains an edible centre of agar – a gelatinous substance that enables the seeds and spores to sprout.

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

As the plants and mushrooms grow, the flavour also develops, transforming into what Rutzerveld claims is a fresh, nutritious and tasty snack after only a few days.

“As it comes out of the 3D printer you can really see the straight lines of the technology,” she says. “But as it develops, you can see organic shapes. You can see the stages of growth and the development of taste and flavour.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

The aim of the project, which Rutzerveld developed in collaboration with the Eindhoven University of Technology and research organisation TNO, was to investigate ways that 3D printing could be used in the food industry.

“By 3D printing food you can make the production chain very short, the transport will be less, there is less land needed,” says Rutzerveld.”But also you can experiment with new structures. You can surprise the consumer with new food and things that haven’t been done before.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

In particular, Rutzerveld wanted to find a way that 3D printers could be used to create fresh and healthy food at home.

“A lot of people think industrialised production methods are unnatural or unhealthy,” Rutzerveld says. “I want to show that it doesn’t have to be the case. You can really see that it’s natural. It’s actually really healthy and sustainable also at the same time.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

However, Rutzerveld’s project is still at the research and development stage and she admits it will be a long time before anyone is able to 3D-print her snacks at home.

“It will take at least another eight to ten years before this can be on the market,” she concedes. “The technologies really need to be developed much further.”

Chloé Rutzerveld

Dezeen and MINI Frontiers is an ongoing collaboration with MINI exploring how design and technology are coming together to shape the future.

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by Ben Hobson |  Thursday, February 26th, 2015 at 1:06 pm