3Digital Cooks!

You’ve Heard of 3D Printing with Plastic, Concrete, and Perhaps Even Bio-material… But This is A Little Different!

http://goo.gl/vT8TO1

hum

Everyone’s favorite go-to party dip is now a 3D printing medium thanks to our friends at 3DigitalCooks (3DC), who recently introduced us to 3D printing with bananas. 3DC is a website that provides the latest news in digital gastronomy. 3D food innovators from around the world share new technologies and creative ideas and solutions relevant to the culinary branch of 3D printing. Now, 3DC’s founder, Luis Rodriguez Alcalde, who lives in Barcelona, Spain, is showcasing the second generation of the 3D food printer he designed, the Pinya2. It seems that the Pinya had some shortcomings and, with Pinya2, Rodriguez Alcalde has worked out the kinks and presents his Lucky Hummus.
color hummus

This colorful presentation of our favorite variation on the chick pea is actually pretty easy to produce. Of course, notes digital chef Rodriguez Alcalde, you’ll need a 3D printer “that works with syringes, cartridges, capsules or any similar container.” He used Pinya2 but you can also have a look at 3DC’s website and see what machines other digital culinary makers are using. Rodriguez Alcalde’s Instructables page also provides instructions for making this delectable digital dish and for creating other print patterns using colorful hummus.

You’ll need to make a batch of hummus and we think it’s probably a good idea to use his recipe, which calls for 150 grams (about 5 ¼ oz.) of chickpeas, 20 grams (3/4 ounce) of tahini, about a tablespoon of olive oil, and a pinch of salt. You’ll also want to make some avocado purée — it’s the green in the leaves of this lucky hummus four-leaf clover that you’ll fill in after you’ve 3D printed the hummus forms. We trust you can handle the purée without using a recipe.

You will need food coloring, a container for each color of hummus, a tablespoon, and a fork. Thin slices of a cherry tomato create the long petal-like garnishes seen in the photo. You don’t need much more than a kitchen blender to make the hummus and the avocado purée. Don’t go crazy with the blending, however; the hummus needs to be fairly thick so that it can be successfully extruded.

You’ll be printing your edible masterpiece on top of a piece of toast or a large cracker.

Here’s basically how the hummus printing works: After mixing the separate colors, you load a a large tablespoon full of hummus into the printing cartridge. Insert one color at a time, pressing one down on the next to create a kind of rainbow effect in the cartridge. Avoid creating any pockets of air in the mixture, as we are reminded that “air pockets are our enemies” when it comes to 3D printing food.

hum2

Rodriguez Alcalde explained that Lucky Hummus was created to test out 3DC’s new air extrusion system that, basically, utilizes compressed air to force the material through the extruder.

A new design tool was also developed specifically for this project. 3DC used Roses, a Javascript tool that, says Rodriguez Alcalde, “uses rhodonea curves equation to generate printing paths for Pinya. The tool result,” he explained, “is a GCode file that works directly with the printer. Somehow it combines design (roses) and slicing (GCode generation).”

He shared a link to the download on the blog page for the Lucky Hummusproject. Although creating a new tool like Roses might seem unnecessarily time-consuming, Rodriguez Alcalde explained that it actually allowed him to eliminate the excess. That is, to include only the parameters required specifically for the Lucky Hummus four-leaf clover pattern.

After several test prints, this pragmatic digital chef observed that lumpy hummus can be a serious impediment to the printing process and encourages those of you who want to try this at home to smooth out the lumps. Also, Rodriguez Alcalde, who emphasizes that he is not a chef, and evidently learned the hard way added: “For [the] avocado purée, keep in mind to balance lemon juice.” If you’ve made guacamole or anything else using avocados then you probably know that lemon or lime juice will keep the green from turning brown, which will definitely make for a more accurate four-leaf hummus clover.

Do try this at home and let us and the team at 3C know how it turns out!

3DPRINT.COM
by  | FEBRUARY 18, 2015

3D printed castle

A man in Minnesota didn’t just manage to design his own 3D printer, but he used it to 3D print a storey-high concrete castle!

This is just a test-run however, as he plans on building a full size two-storey house with it!

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/man-3d-prints-castle-back-garden-u…

A 3D-printed castle

A building contractor living in Minnesota has developed his own 3D printer which can print concrete directly from CAD design software, and he has used it to 3D-print a castle in his back garden.

According to 3DPrint.com, Andrey Rudenko has printed a small single-level castle (a child’s playhouse) in just three months, as part of a test before printing a full-sized two story house, which would make it bigger than the houses that were 3D-printed in 24 hours in China.

Similar to the Chinese inventor Ma Yihe, Rudenko has built a 3D printer that prints out a mixture of cement and sand in layers measuring 20mm by 5mm, using technology and software from the open-source RepRap 3D printing project.

However, Rudenko, who has a background in architecture and engineering, is critical of Ma’s design. He thinks that the ten 200 sq m houses that Ma printed are more like shells than homes.

“A cheap house built in 24 hours is not my goal. As an experienced builder, I know that to avoid problems in the future, it is more important to produce homes of a good quality, which may take longer to build than cheaper homes made quickly,” Rudenko said.

“It would be more beneficial to print a complete home, including the foundation for the staircase, fireplace, certain furniture (kitchen island etc), columns, interior walls, and any wiring or plumbing that would fit inside the printed walls.”

He has also designed his 3D printer to print the concrete at such a high viscosity that the printed walls can act as a decorative element, as opposed to the Chinese homes, which had quite rough-looking jagged edges, and would require sheetrock (dry wall) to be added on top before they would be habitable.

Rudenko’s castle was printed completely outside in his garden, where the cement sets quickly in the warm summer temperatures of 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Farenheit).

The structure is large enough for adults to walk into, and to give you a measure of how long it took to print, the darker area of the castle, which measures 50cm in height, was constructed in eight hours using his 3D printer.

“I still have some imperfections, mostly when I stop the printer, but if I print nonstop, the layers look great,” said Rudenko.

“Though I’m not completely finished with this structure yet, from the current progress, I can already see that I am ready for the next step, which is printing a house with this technology.”

Rudenko is looking to collaborate on his 3D printer project with other architects, engineers, builders and 3D-printing enthusiasts (his email is listed at the end of the video).

The race to produce 3D printers that can print buildings continues as, in theory, the technology could bring affordable housing to people in developing countries and revolutionise the construction industry.

Slovenian firm BetAbram plans to release a 3D printer that can print a house next month. The BetAbram P3 can print structures measuring up to 144 sq m.

IBTIMES.CO.UK
by  | July 31, 2014 16:15 BST