Imaginative children’s drawings and 3D printing

http://www.psfk.com/2015/07/3d-printed-drawings-childrens-drawings-toys-moyupi.html

3D Printing Brings Imaginative Children’s Drawings to Their Playrooms

3D Printing Brings Imaginative Children’s Drawings to Their Playrooms

Now kids can bring their made-up monsters to life with MOYUPI.

Did you ever make up some fantastical creatures as a kid that you wished existed as actual toys? Maybe you tried to put your parents to work helping you mold them out of clay? MOYUPI promises to make kids’ creatures even more real through the magic of 3D printing and a little hand-painting.

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The company uses digital modeling software to prepare your creature (or MOYUPI) for 3D printing, and then renders them in kid-friendly, durable ABS plastic. Due to the rudimentary nature of color 3D printing and the creators’ desire to precisely follow directions, color is carefully added to the designs by hand. MOYUPI can be rendered in three different sizes (15cm, 10cm and 7cm) and two types of boxes designed by Brazilian artist and illustrator Mayra Magalhães, and can also be shipped without paint so kids can do it themselves.

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The limitations of 3D printing that the creators have encountered also happen to sync up fairly well with many children’s drawings; for example, irregular shapes are considered ideal for making a MOYUPI, but stick figures and other designs below a minimum thickness can’t be accepted. The MOYUPI project also encourages children to be original, as the creators can’t print licensed characters like Spongebob or Elsa (but they can print designs inspired by them).

“A team composed by artists… is the opportunity to get creative in the design process,” said MOYUPI founder Juan Ángel Medina in an email. “‘How did the kid imagine his Moyupi?’, ‘is that an arm or a horn?’, ‘is this element part of the shape or just something drawn on it?’. These questions aren’t always easy to answer, so we need to put our minds in a kid-like state to imagine what the kids wanted to portray and design it in the most accurate way.”

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So what’s the big-picture mission with MOYUPI? The young team of six designers says they are interested in donating a portion of the company’s proceeds to organizations: “ASPACE, ALES, PÍDEME LA LUNA and ASPERGER, each one linked to one of MOYUPI mascots.”

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An early-bird special allows backers who pledge $34 or more to receive a small MOYUPI figure as well as a Maxi Pack; a special XXL size (30 cm high) for $114 will also only be available during the special Kickstarter campaign. A variety of other configurations, some geared toward multiple kids and families, should be a great opportunity for kids and adults alike to unleash their creativity.

“The material I would like to use for the Moyupi is a rubber-like one, in order to make them even more friendly and resistant. That’s a possibility we are currently researching,”  said Medina. Stretch goals also include a video game, YouTube series and research into making posable, articulated figures: all promising ideas for a kids’ brand.

psfk.com

by RACHEL PINCUS | 17 JULY 2015

 

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Separated of twins, joined at the butt thanks to 3D printing technology

http://3dprint.com/71548/conjoined-twins-butt-3d-print/

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Twins, Joined at the Butt, Will be Separated Tomorrow Thanks to 3D Printing Technology

3D printing has been used to change the lives of many people over the past several years. Whether it is for lending a hand in the rapid prototyping of products, creating prosthetic hands for children with upper arm differences, or allowing surgeons to perform high risk surgeries with much more ease than ever before, the technology is certainly providing ample benefit to society.

Back in February, we reported on a complex surgery that was undertaken in Texas to separate conjoined twins. To complete the surgery, a detailed medical model was created to aid surgeons in the delicate operation. Now doctors in China are doing the same.

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Tomorrow (June 9), will be a huge day for one family in China, as their beautiful newborn conjoined twin girls will be separated from each other for the first time in their lives. Born on March 17 in Nanjing County of South Fujian, China, the twins were found to be conjoined at the buttocks area. In fact, they share part of the same digestive tract and portions of their anus. Like most surgeries which involve the separation of conjoined twins, it is an extremely risky and difficult operation.

The girls have been transferred to the Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, where the surgery will take place tomorrow. Surgeons opted to wait until the girls were 3 months old and weighed approximately 10kg in order to perform the risky surgery. In studies, this has been shown to be the best time to perform such an invasive procedure, as babies tend to be strong enough at this point, and their bodies are ready to heal on their own.

These twins are in good hands though, as in the past 15 years, the Children’s Hospital of Fudan University has successfully separated 7 sets of conjoined twins. On top of this, using CT scan data, the surgeons were able to create an accurate 3D printed replica of the twins which doctors were able to simulate surgery on. They have used this 3D printed model to perform a mock operation, and in the process were able to revise their “real” surgical plan to make it more efficient and safe. While it is the very first time that 3D printing was used in order to aid in the separation of twins at this hospital, the hospital has used 3D printing in the past for other surgeries.

The surgery will include the separation of the twins, as well as reconstruction of their perineums and the rectums.  Currently the twins share a little less than 1cm of the same anus. It will certainly be a difficult surgery, but with the help of 3D printing, the surgical team feels very confident.

As far as the cost of the surgery, it is very expensive, but the family got a helping hand from the “Angel Mother” charity, in the amount of 200,000 yuan (approximately $32,231).

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Best of luck to these beautiful twin girls as they undergo quite an extensive surgery tomorrow. What do you think about the use of 3D printing in creating medical models for complicated surgeries like this? Discuss in the Conjoined Twins forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3dprint.com

by  | JUNE 8, 2015

3D printing impact on human life

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/meet-3-kids-alive-today-thanks-to-a-3d-printer/

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Meet 3 kids alive today thanks to a 3D printer

A 3D printer saved the lives of three baby boys with the same life-threatening condition, their doctors report in the latest issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Kaiba Gionfriddo was six weeks old when he turned blue because his lungs weren’t getting enough oxygen. He was diagnosed with a terminal form of tracheobronchomalacia, a medical condition that causes the windpipe to periodically collapse and prevents normal breathing. With no cure and a low life expectancy, doctors told his mother April he may not make it out of the hospital alive.

Kaiba was one of the three babies who became the first in the world to receive 3D-printed devices that helped keep their airways open so they could breathe properly, thus saving their lives. “These cases broke new ground for us because we were able to use 3D printing to design a device that successfully restored patients’ breathing through a procedure that had never been done before,” Glenn Green, MD, an associate professor of pediatric otolaryngology at the University of Michigan’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, said in a statement.

Tracheobronchomalacia affects about 1 in 2,000 children around the world, according to the doctors, and renders them unable to fully exhale. Using a 3D printer, Green and his colleagues were able to create and implant a customized splint around the airways of the three boys to expand the trachea and bronchus. This 3D printed device is made to change shape over time as the children grow, and eventually be reabsorbed by the body as the condition is cured.

The findings in the report suggest that this early intervention may prevent complications of conventional treatment of tracheobronchomalacia such as a tracheostomy, prolonged hospitalization, mechanical ventilation, cardiac and respiratory arrest, food malabsorption and discomfort.

Kaiba was the first to receive the implant three years ago and his doctors report that the splint has degraded and he appears to be disease-free. “Before this procedure, babies with severe tracheobronchomalacia had little chance of surviving,” Green said. “Today, our first patient Kaiba is an active, healthy 3-year-old in preschool with a bright future. The device worked better than we could have ever imagined.”

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Two other children have also had success with the device.

Garrett Peterson received one a the age of 16 months. Garrett spent the first year of his life in hospital beds tethered to a ventilator, being fed through his veins because his body was too sick to absorb food.

Since receiving the device, he has not shown signs of any complications and is leading a normal life, able to breathe properly, doctors say.

Ian Orbich’s condition was so grave that his heart stopped before he was even six months old. He received a customized 3D-printed splint and is now doing well at the age of 17 months.

Green and his colleagues received emergency clearance from the FDA to do the procedures. While these three cases appear to be a huge success, the doctors noted that this technology will take time to put into widespread practice. “The potential of 3D-printed medical devices to improve outcomes for patients is clear, but we need more data to implement this procedure in medical practice,” Green said. The authors also acknowledge that potential complications of the procedure may not yet be evident.

Yet if you ask Kaiba’s mom, April Gionfriddo, the procedure was nothing short of a miracle. “The first time he was hospitalized, doctors told us he may not make it out,” she said in a statement. “It was scary knowing he was the first child to ever have this procedure, but it was our only choice and it saved his life.”

cbsnews.com

by ASHLEY WELCH, CBS NEWS | April 29, 2015, 2:05 PM

3D printed hearts

3D Printed models may help lower surgeries in children related to congenital heart disease, according to the Association of Cardiovascular Imaging’s EuroEcho-Imaging 2014 conference 🙂

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/286489.php

illustration of a heart

Heart surgeries in children with congenital heart disease could be reduced if 3D-printed models of patients’ hearts could be used to plan their treatment in advance, according to a presentation at the the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging’s EuroEcho-Imaging 2014 conference.

“3D imaging is a main theme of EuroEcho-Imaging this year and 3D printing of the heart is particularly exciting,” said president of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging, Prof. Patrizio Lancellotti. “It allows us to make a perfect model of a patient’s anatomy and decide the optimal device and procedure in advance.”

It is possible to create replicas of people’s hearts using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The scans are then printed using flexible materials.

Dr. Peter Verschueren, who spoke on the topic at EuroEcho-Imaging 2014, said:

“Until recently, doctors would look at an image and then try to visualize the heart in 3D. Now they can use a 3D copy of an individual patient’s heart to plan the procedure in detail before they go into the operating theater.”

As well as congenital heart diseases, such as double outlet right ventricle or Tetralogy of Fallot, Dr. Verschueren says the 3D-printed hearts could be used to plan interventions for “complex bicuspid aortic valve cases that doctors want to treat with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and new transcatheter interventions for repairing or replacing the mitral and tricuspid valves.”

Also at EuroEcho-Imaging 2014, biomedical research engineer Helen O’Grady presented a 3D-printed model of tricuspid regurgitation, which was used as a training aid. To create the model, CT scans of tricuspid regurgitation patients were used to build a 3D software model, which formed the blueprint for the 3D-printed heart.

O’Grady also molded a more flexible model to replicate the anatomical properties of the heart in the body as well as the motion of the valve.

“There is a variation in normal anatomies and more so in diseased anatomies such as tricuspid regurgitation,” O’Grady told the attendees. She continued:

“Being able to practice on the model allows for better surgical planning and doctors can optimize the interventional procedure pre-operatively. Cardiologists, surgeons and physicians say there’s nothing like having a tangible model in your hands as it gives such invaluable insight into the patient anatomy involved.”

Another benefit of 3D models, she added, is that they can be used to discuss the intervention not only with the medical team, but with patients and parents of children with congenital heart defects.

“It helps everyone affected to better understand what the procedure will involve,” she said.

3D printing to plan face transplants

In other 3D printing news, a study presented this month at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America also made the case for CT-based 3D printing as a tool for planning face transplantation surgery.

To do this, surgeons made 3D-printed models of the patients’ heads, which allowed them to physically hold and study a life-size model of the skull they would be operating on.

“If there are absent or missing bony structures needed for reconstruction, we can make modifications based on the 3D-printed model prior to the actual transplantation, instead of taking the time to do alterations during ischemia time,” said Dr. Frank J. Rybicki, radiologist and director of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA. “The 3D model is important for making the transplant cosmetically appealing.”

MEDICALNEWSTODAY.COM
by David McNamee |  5 December 2014 at 8am PST

3D printed iron man hand

This could very well be the coolest sounding prosthetic hand that you will have ever laid your eyes on (for now!)

There isn’t anything we can say that does it justice. The title says it all! 🙂

http://3dprint.com/19219/3d-printed-iron-man-hand/

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One of the up-and-coming technological advancements that we have seen, thanks to 3D printing, has been the huge influx of 3D printable prosthetic hands for children and adults in need. Traditionally, prosthetic hands have cost around $50,000, and typically are not available to children due to the fact that insurance companies refuse to pick up the tab on devices which a child will outgrow in less than two years. 3D printing allows for the creation and sharing of 3-dimensional design files, followed by the quick and very affordable fabrication of the designed object. The average 3D printed prosthetic hand costs under $50, and can be completely customized and fabricated in a single day.

Because the vast majority of these hands are made for children, we have seen several designers make some fun, creative designs targeted toward these youngsters. We’ve seen hands that light up, Wolverine hands, card-playing hands, and even commando style hands created for people of all ages and interests. All of these are 3D printed and made specifically to fit the person that they are printed for.

A little over a month ago, we heard about a 3D printed Iron Man prosthetic hand. It was printed in the colors of Iron Man and had a few additional features. With this said, a man named Pat Starace has taken the idea of creating an Iron Man themed prosthetic hand and made it, quite frankly, cooler than any prosthetic device that I have ever seen. Not only is Starace’s hand colored in the theme of Iron Man, but it actually incorporates much of the same technology and appearances that the superhero actually has on his hand.

“The hand is a container for all modern technology,” Starace tells 3DPrint.com. “It can incorporate microcontrollers, wireless devices, smart watches, sensors, accelerometers, NFC, RFID, and almost any technology. This hand is configured with an Arduino Microcontroller, Low Power Bluetooth, Lipo Battery, Lipo Charger, LED’s, and RGB LED’s. It can also be Voice Controlled.”

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Like the hand of Iron Man, Starace’s prosthetic incorporates a working laser, and working thruster (OK maybe it doesn’t actually thrust, but it looks cool). It has the option for adding a gyro, magnetometer, and more, as mentioned by Starace above. The shield is another key characteristic of the hand, and it houses cool weapons like the laser, which can be fired along side red LED lights that light up when the hand is tilted down. The thrusters are activated when tilting the hand back, like seen in the many Iron Man movies. Also when this happens, a ring light of bright RGB LED’s begin cycling through animated patterns.

“I had a vision that a 3D printed hand could be both functional and fun,” Starace tells us. “My main goal is to help a child that is going through life with a disability, and facing everyday challenges in their lives, by making them the COOLEST KID in their school. I can only think this will make a great impact on a child during their early years by raising their self-esteem to Super Hero Levels.”

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Unlike other prosthetic hands that we have seen created in the past, which utilized open source designs that are already out there, available for free, Starace designed his hand from the ground up. He started out by working from photographs that he found on the internet. He then started to model the hand in MAYA.

“I started modeling the palm and the fingers with polygons until I had the right shape. There’s a sort of organic mechanical shape to these parts, the goal was to replicate them as close as I could and retain the same look and feel. After I had the right shape in polygons it was time to import the model into Solidworks and start the mechanical design. Converting the polygons to a format that Solidworks could import, while still retaining the integrity of the model was going to be difficult. Knowing I’d be performing Solidworks procedure and features on the parts, it had to be done. I achieved this by creating an IGES Curve network on top my polygon model in MAYA.”

Assembling the Iron Man hand

All in all, it took Starace over 48 total hours of print time to fabricate the many different parts of the hand, including several iterations of some parts. He printed the parts on his Deezemaker Bukobot in ABS plastic. Once printing was complete, he had to remove all of the support material (there was a lot!). “It was with great excitement to see the model assembled and perform EXACTLY as I had designed it,” he tells us. “I can only attribute this to the over 20+ years I have creating animatronics. I added the electronics, switches, lights, and this brings to to where we’re at now… looking for a child to empower with Super Hero Powers.”

Without a doubt, this is the most interesting, interactive, fun, and mesmerizing prosthetic hand that I have ever seen. Starace thinks that it has a lot of potential, not only for cheering up kids with missing hands, but also for teaching them how to program the microcontrollers that operate the cool features of their device.

While Starace didn’t use any of the e-NABLE designs for his hand, he has recently joined up with the volunteer 3D printing prosthetic organization, and will be cooperating with them to bring the best open source prosthetic hands to those in need.  Starace currently makes himself available for all kinds of work.

What do you think about this incredibly feature rich prosthetic hand? Discuss in the 3D Printed Prosthetic Iron Man Hand forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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3DPRINT.COM
by  | OCTOBER 15, 2014

3D printed ears to transplant

3D printed ears are going to be transplanted on children in India, hopefully restoring their hearing!

At this rate it looks like in a number of years we might be able to order 3D printed body parts online and having them delivered to our local hospital/clinic for transplants 🙂

http://3dprintingindustry.com/…/scientists-transplant-3d-p…/

The BBC will be airing an exciting special BBC Inside Out London special in which the show’s host, Dr. Ranj Singh, pays a visit to the lab of Professor Alex Selfalian at University College London where he and his team are in the process of 3D printing ears made from real human tissue.

As you’ll see in the preview clip below, the lab uses uses accurate scan data to 3D print an ear replica from a nanopolymer.  The print is then sterilized and implanted under the skin of a patient’s forearm, where it acts as a scaffold for human tissue.  Skin and blood vessels grow in around the print over the course of four to eight weeks, at which point, a plastic surgeon removes the ear and places it on the head.

3D printed ear transplanted into rat skin

The scientists at UCL have already tested the growth procedure on rats and, in the next few months, they hope to perform their first human trials in Mumbai, India, where twelve children are awaiting the surgery.  If the implants are a success, the procedure could replace the current method for handling this congenital deformity, which requires shaping rib cartilage into the shape of an ear and three or four different surgeries.

3DPRINTINGINDUSTRY.COM
by  | OCTOBER 6, 2014