3Dvarius debuts – check it!

http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/3dvarius-debuts-as-first-fully-playable-3d-printed-violin-1.3189914

French violinist Laurent Bernadac spent years designing 3Dvarius, billed as the first playable, 3D-printed violin. Its streamlined design was inspired by the classical world's much-coveted Stradivarius violins.

3Dvarius debuts as first fully playable 3D-printed violin

French violinist spent years designing futuristic, minimalist instrument.

A Stradivarius violin is considered one of the world’s most coveted classical instruments, but amateur musicians could soon be jamming on homemade Strads.

French violinist Laurent Bernadac has unveiled 3Dvarius, billed as the first fully playable 3D-printed violin.

The translucent creation is inspired by the much-coveted instruments created by Italian master Antonio Stradivari in his legendary Cremona shop in the 17th century.

However, the design was then stripped down to be as lightweight as possible and allow for extreme freedom of movement for contemporary musicians.

The 3Dvarius is essentially an electric violin and uses a magnetic pickup to detect the vibrations made by the strings and must be plugged into an amplifier.

Produced as a single piece using stereolithography – a 3D technology that prints models one layer at a time by rapidly curing a liquid polymer using UV lasers – the model had to be strong enough to withstand the tension and pressure of violin strings, which also have to be tuneable.

Bernadac revealed one of the first successful prototypes, nicknamed Pauline, in videos released this month.

The musician, whose high-energy performances blend the traditionally classical instrument with guitar, the cajon percussion box and other sounds, has spent the past few years designing the futuristic-looking 3Dvarius.

References:

cbc.ca

http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/3dvarius-debuts-as-first-fully-playable-3d-printed-violin-1.3189914

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New face for a girl thanks of 3D printing

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/3d-printing-helps-give-girl-a-new-face-1.3014957

Violet Pietrok, playing with her father Matt, was born two years ago with a Tessier cleft, a rare deformity in which the bones that form the face have not fused properly. Thanks to 3D printing of models of her skull, Violet has begun a series of surgeries to correct the problem.

3D printing helps give girl a new face

Doctors practise on an exact image of face before repairing deformity.

The great thing about medical school cadavers is that they can’t die.

If a surgeon in training makes a mistake, there’s always next time. It is the last environment where medical errors have no consequences.

But 3D printing is changing that, giving even experienced operating room teams valuable practice on a model that looks and feels like the real thing. It has life-saving and life-altering implications.

Violet Pietrok was born two years ago with a rare deformity called a Tessier cleft. The bones that normally join to form the fetal face had not fused properly.

  • Watch David Common’s full story on The National Sunday April 5 at 9 p.m.

As a result, Violet’s eyes were set so far apart, her vision was more like a bird’s than a human’s. She also had no cartilage in her nose.

But the corrective operation is extraordinarily complex. So Violet’s family turned to one of the world’s leading reconstructive surgeons, Dr. John Meara, at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Violet Pietrok

He warned them of the danger of making sophisticated cuts through the skull, very close to the optic nerve. “They might be very close to the brain,” Meara explained in an interview. “So the ability to make these cuts on the model first and see the trajectory of a sawblade or where that cut would come through in relationship to the eye is absolutely critical.”

To get that model, the simulation team at Boston Children’s took multiple MRIs of Violet’s skull and replicated it on a 3D printer.

It took more than a day to print, but the model is exact. Even the density of the bone is precise.

 “We were actually able to do the procedure before going into the operating room,” Meara said.

“So we made the cuts in the model, made the bony movements that we would be making in Violet’s case and we identified some issues that we modified prior to going into the operating room, which saves time and means that you’re not making some of these critical decisions in the operating room.”

During the surgery earlier this year, Meara kept a model of Violet’s skull close by and referred to it as he went through the complicated steps of the operation. This successful surgery was just the first of several that will be needed to remake Violet’s face.

Other hospitals are interested

Boston’s success has prompted a lot of calls from hospitals around the world looking to set up their own 3D printing simulations to Dr. PeterWeinstock, who runs the Boston program.

He equates medicine with sports teams. Any team worth its salt, he says, practises before the game.

“We looked at that and thought, why is health care not doing that?  If you can see the patient before you see the patient, if you can do the operation before you do the operation, you have the opportunity to tailor your approach, to tailor your team to the specific environment and event. Think about that opportunity.”

Weinstock’s printer now runs 24/7 preparing for procedures at Boston Children’s — well worth the $400,000 investment.

The models are game-changing — giving a whole new meaning to personalized medicine. With each new print, the models are getting more sophisticated. Soon, the replicated veins and arteries will bleed as they would in real-life.

Boston Children’s has also found better recovery times. Patients of surgeons who’ve practised on the models typically leave hospital sooner and get back on their feet more easily.

Weinstock’s simulation program really took off a few years ago with Surgical Sam, the world’s first operable infant mannequin.

A model of an individual

But Weinstock wanted not just a model of generic human but one of a specific person.

That’s also what Adam Stedman needed. Adam was born witharteriovenous malformation or AVM, a tangled mess of arteries and veins in the brain that restricts blood flow and prompts progressively worse seizures that can cause brain damage.

He could have had a stroke at any moment, or a hemorrhage, his mother Amy tearily explained. But surgically tackling the web of tubes inside Adam’s brain was also potentially deadly, or it could leave him blind.

The 3D printer re-created Adam’s brain — including the AVM — something his surgeon could hold, manipulate, examine, re-examine and ultimately, practice on.

The surgery was a success — taking only a third of the expected time because the entire operating room team had done it before just hours earlier on the practice model.

When Adam came out of the OR, he smiled and his mother broke down. “He just has a blind spot,” she said in an interview in her Connecticut home. To her, that’s a big improvement.

“I honestly think that the 3D printing has the majority to do with that, as far as where they knew, where to cut and where not to.”

cbc.ca

by David Common, CBC News | Apr 04, 2015 5:00 AM ET

First 3D printed prosthetic legs to Ugandans

The World’s First-Ever Fully Functional 3D Printed Leg Socket is Now Being Replicated in Uganda

http://goo.gl/p8N05t

Ruth Nakaye (right) is the first person in the world to receive a fully functional prosthetic leg with a socket created using 3D printing technology. The first step in the creation process involves scanning the residual limb, as Moses Kaweesa (left) is doing here.

Researchers provide world’s first functional 3D printed prosthetic legs to Ugandans.

Canadian researchers and a 3D printer are making medical history in Uganda.

The Canadian team from the University of Toronto recently helped a young Ugandan woman walk with the world’s first functional 3D-printedprosthetic leg socket, the critical customized element that is the main component of an artificial limb.

“It makes me feel proud … it’s prestigious,” says Ruth Nakaye, the 20-year-old from Kampala who received the team’s first prosthesis.

During a five-day visit to Kampala in January, the researchers used a 3D printer to make sockets, the customized part of a prosthesis that attaches to an individual’s body and forms to the thigh for those with amputations below the knee. They then connected the sockets to the standard pylons and feet that the Red Cross provides for prosthetics in developing countries to complete the replacement limbs.

Matt Ratto

MattRatto, a Toronto professor and principal investigator for the project, says he believes this combination is the world’s first3D-printedleg to be used outside laboratories and test environments.

The Canadian researchers are working with Christian Blind Mission Canada (CBM) and Ugandan prosthetists to make limb replacements more affordable and help alleviate the shortage of technicians in developing countries.

3D printing technology has a number of benefits, the team says. It makes the production of prosthetic limbs more efficient, saving time and money for the patient, which is particularly important in places like Uganda where many people have very limited incomes.

It also allows the small number of Ugandan prosthetists to handle more cases than they could with the time-consuming manual plaster method, says Ratto.

Affordable prostheses

Nakaye, who was born without her full left leg, says she was excited to wear her new 3D-printed prosthesis home. Prosthetics have allowed her to play sports and attend school. Nakaye missed two years of primary education because she lacked mobility until a charity paid for her first artificial limb, she says.

3D printer

Unfortunately, Nakaye’s story is not uncommon in her country.

The majority of those with physical disabilities can’t accessprosthetics because of the cost, saysDolorenceWere, executive director of the Uganda Society for Disabled Children.

It’s difficult for many Ugandans – 38 per cent of whom live on less than $1.25 US a day – to pay at least $300, excluding hospital fees and travel expenses, for a prosthesis, says Mitchell Wilkie, CBM’s director of international programs.

Children also grow an average of 2 centimetres a year, and generally need a new prosthesis every six months or so. Patients and their family often need to spend a week at a hospital and make recurrent visits to get fitted for a new prosthesis. But in Uganda, where 86 per cent of the population survives on subsistence farming, many locals can’t afford to pay for prostheses or take time away from their fields, says Wilkie.

Roseline Cheptoo, 4, also received a 3D-printed prosthesis from the Canadian researchers. It was her third week-long visit for prosthetic fittings, and her family travelled more than seven hours from Amudatdistrict in northern Uganda to reach the hospital in the capital city.

“Our parents don’t have jobs – they grow corn and peanuts and sell any surplus at markets,” says her brother, Sailas Akodumoi, 19. “I’m not sure how my family will afford to pay for future prosthetic legs after the charity ends her sponsorship this year.”

Skills shortage

The main issue for Ugandans, however, isn’t the cost of prosthetics or hospital services, Ratto says. It’s access to skilled people who can fit them.

Moses Kaweesa

“You could make [prosthetics ]

zero dollars and you’d still have the same issue; there are too few prosthetic technicians in developing countries.”

Studying to become an accredited prosthetist or orthopedic technologist who can make prostheticstakes at least three years, says MosesKaweesa, who studied the skill at Makerere University in Kampala.

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that in the developing world, there’s a shortfall of 40,000 prosthetic technicians. It adds that it would take 50 years to train just another 18,000, according to a 2003 study.

There are approximately 12 prosthetic technicians in Uganda, according to CBM. And there are about 10 facilities where prosthetics can be made in the country, adds Malcolm Simpson, chief executive officer of the project’s partner hospital.

This is where 3D printers could help.

Currently, it takes three to six days to use plaster to create a negative cast of a residual limb, fill it and mould a prosthesis, explains AbdullahIssa, a local prosthetist. Adjustments are often needed, meaning more manual work.

Roseline Cheptoo

“The 3D technology we’ve introduced in Uganda cuts this work down to as little as six hours,” saysRatto.

It takes just a few minutes to do a 3D scan of a residual limb and use software to shape the prosthesis. Then the printer takes a few hours to produce the customized socket from the scan.

The time saved compared to traditional methods of producing a socket will allow prosthetiststo see five to six times more patients a week,Ratto says.

It also adds precision, says Issa, who has been working with the technology since January. “You can make exact adjustments, rather than guessing like we do with the manual method.”

The time-saving technology is also affordable enough that it can be used by facilities in developing countries.

“The consumer-grade 3D printers that we’re using cost $2,000 and $6,000 – and the software, MeshMixer, is free,” explains Ratto.

The Ugandan project will continue over the next six months as the Toronto researchers study the comfort and durability of the 3D-printedsockets, he says.

And he adds that the project should benefit patients in Canada as well.

“It isn’t so much a developed-world technology being redeployed to a developing world context, it’s exactly the reverse,” says Ratto. “Everything we’re learning through this project can be used in developed countries to help produce prosthetics more efficiently and affordably for Canadians too, and that’s what’s interesting.”

CBC.CA
by Julia Burpee, CBC News | Feb 16, 2015 5:00 AM ET