3D printed ears to transplant

3D printed ears are going to be transplanted on children in India, hopefully restoring their hearing!

At this rate it looks like in a number of years we might be able to order 3D printed body parts online and having them delivered to our local hospital/clinic for transplants 🙂

http://3dprintingindustry.com/…/scientists-transplant-3d-p…/

The BBC will be airing an exciting special BBC Inside Out London special in which the show’s host, Dr. Ranj Singh, pays a visit to the lab of Professor Alex Selfalian at University College London where he and his team are in the process of 3D printing ears made from real human tissue.

As you’ll see in the preview clip below, the lab uses uses accurate scan data to 3D print an ear replica from a nanopolymer.  The print is then sterilized and implanted under the skin of a patient’s forearm, where it acts as a scaffold for human tissue.  Skin and blood vessels grow in around the print over the course of four to eight weeks, at which point, a plastic surgeon removes the ear and places it on the head.

3D printed ear transplanted into rat skin

The scientists at UCL have already tested the growth procedure on rats and, in the next few months, they hope to perform their first human trials in Mumbai, India, where twelve children are awaiting the surgery.  If the implants are a success, the procedure could replace the current method for handling this congenital deformity, which requires shaping rib cartilage into the shape of an ear and three or four different surgeries.

3DPRINTINGINDUSTRY.COM
by  | OCTOBER 6, 2014
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3D printable ‘life hacks’ – better life

Our latest blog post: From cable spools to kazoos, we look at some great 3D printable ‘life hacks’ that make your life easier, guaranteed!

http://malta3dprinting.blogspot.com/…/awesome-3d-printable-…

3D Printed Swiss Army Fold-out Keychain

Today we’ll be taking a look at a few awesome 3D printable products which have officially reached ‘life hack’ status.

Amidst our more serious blog posts, this entry will be about easy-to-use, and more importantly, easy-to-make products which may not change the world – but will definitely help to put a smile on people’s faces.

Here’s one for the fruit-loving house party hosts – a printable tap which transforms a watermelon into a keg!

All you require are the beverages of your choice, and a knife to cut open the watermelon. Remove the melon chunks, add some ice, pop your tap into the makeshift fruit keg and prepare to conquer your thirst!

These fun products are great for a family day by the pool or to provide some much needed novelty at a house party.

The tap is the result of a combination between a team dedicated to life-hacking and a 3D printing company started by the people, for the people – Household Hackers and Robo 3D, respectively. According to 3DPrintingIndustry.com, this nifty tap was created using a Robo 3D R1 printer.

It can, of course, be used for more conventional purposes, but this one is by far the most awesome.

Next up, we’ve got a nifty little item that packs a musical punch. The ‘Kazoo‘ – a handheld instrument which requires users to hum into it – can provide hours of sweet-sounding fun.

Appropriate for both professional and amateurs alike, this small instrument definitely has mass appeal. It’s bound to have parents and neighbors across the globe in search for a fine set of ear plugs.

Hours have been spent tooting away at the Malta 3D Printing office, with a trusty kazoo never more than a few feet away!According to the Guiness Book of World Records, on 14th March 2011, over 5,000 kazoo players teamed up to create their own rendition of one of Wagner’s greatest compositions, ‘The Ride of the Valkyries’. How many of those kazoos were 3D printed?

Moving on, we present to our viewers a simple, yet handy product which is bound to help people save a few extra pennies. Have you ever known there was some toothpaste left in the end of the tube, but couldn’t be bothered to awkwardly squeeze it out?

This trusty tube roller is meant for those occasions!

Its incredibly easy-to-use, just fit it onto your desired tube and twist away. Guaranteed to squeeze every last drop out of your bothersome tubes. Don’t like the colour? Good thingMalta 3D Printing has dozens of alternatives.

The item pictured below is a cool alternative to that annoying bunch of keys on a ring. This 3D printable Swiss army knife can hold a number of keys, and should fit into a pocket nicely.

Say goodbye to that frustrating feeling you experience when you pull your mobile phone out of your pocket, only to realize its been scratched by your cumbersome key ring. Furthermore, printing this product in a nice bright colour will reduce the amount of time we spend looking for our keys!

Finally, we bring to you another tool that can help you tackle another common nuisance.

We’ve all gone through our fair share of mobile phones, speakers, and the myriad of other devices which come with 2-3 different cables per box. This cute cable spool allows you to store your wires in a practical way, and even when in use, guarantees things remain nice and tidy.

These spools can be easily stacked on top of each other or placed side-by-side neatly, as opposed to simply having a pile of wires left in a dusty box under your bed.

The examples listed here are only a speck of sand in the beach that is 3D printing. There are literally thousands of products out there that are can be immensely useful, or entertaining!

Don’t hesitate to contact Malta 3D Printing for any of the items listed above! 😉

MALTA3DPRINTING.BLOGSPOT.COM
by  | 22 August 2014

The movies – inspiration to 3D printing

Our latest blog post: A look at how and why Tinseltown is focusing on 3D printing for movie production!

http://malta3dprinting.blogspot.com/…/why-hollywoods-intere…

In theaters across the world, fans watch in amazement as lifelike costumes and props take centre stage in blockbuster movies. We’ve all been spoiled by advanced CGI (computer generated imagery), sitting back as we admire an ultra-realistic ocean glistening below a hovering alien mother-ship on screen.

The list of computer generated images is endless, and some movies rely entirely on these graphical reproductions.

Luckily, 3D printing is stepping in to add some much needed realness to our favourite flicks. The Iron Man movie series serves as a prime example – with an untold number of suits having been 3D printed by Legacy Effects for all 3 Iron Man titles.

One can only imagine the amount of time and precision required to produce such works of art, and Lead Systems Engineer at Legacy Effects, Jason Lopes, can attest to this.

In this short interview with Bloomberg, Lopes gives a quick breakdown on why 3D printing is rapidly replacing older methods of costume creation.

Lopes states that, as a traditional special effects studio that once relied on high-qualityanimatronics and sculpting (to name a few), it was essential that they kept up to date with the latest technological trends.

Besides the impressive Iron Man suit on their resume, Legacy Effects have also produced models for other smash hits like Real Steel and Pacific Rim. The ‘Noisy Boy’ a fully-operational, hydraulic robot created for the Real Steel feature film, reportedly costed tens of thousands of dollars to complete.

While Legacy Effects remains an alpha male of the 3D printing prop and costume world, others are also making a name for themselves. According to 3DPrintingIndustry.com, Terry Gilliam – the world famous writer, director and actor – requested a cutting edge movie prop for his new movie, ‘The Zero Theorem.’
Of course – it had to be 3D printed – and Gilliam reportedly selected FATHOM and North Design Labs to craft this space-age device. North provided the creative mojo while FATHOM delivered in the technical department, a combination which resulted in this movie prop:

This convincing, alien gadget gets plenty of screen time, housing a Samsung Galaxy Tablet and acting as a interactive mini-computer. According to 3DPrinterWorld.com, the entire device was 3D printed and assembled within a couple of days.

It was printed by an Objet500 Connex, a high-range printer capable of printing numerous materials in a single session.

Not only are these exciting products being sold to mega-rich movie companies, but mega-rich customers too. According to techeblog.com, the cleverly named ‘Iron Man Factory’ situated in Shenzhen, China, is producing replicas that cost an arm and a leg.

At $35,000, the 3D printed, carbon-fiber Iron Man suit is hardly going to be selling like hotcakes, but is sure to tickle serious fans’ fancy.

Less wealthy Iron Man aficionados out there can also settle for the non-3D printed version for only $2,000 dollars.

These are only the beginnings of a very promising lunge into the movie industry. It’s no surprise Hollywood is taking notice of 3D printing – as time constraints become greater – faster, rapid prototyping methods of production will quickly gain precedence.

Albeit expensive, 3D printing has too many advantages not to be taken seriously.

MALTA3DPRINTING.BLOGSPOT.COM
by  | 19 August 2014

First analog 3D printer

"3D printing for hipsters.</p><br /> <p>http://3dprintingindustry.com/2014/07/16/3d-printing-goes-analog/"

Look at this amazing analog rube goldbergian looking 3D printer. It uses no electricity, no computers, has no automation of any kind and is constructed entirely from spare parts and other low cost materials. And the fact that I’ve made zero hipster jokes at this point should tell you how very cool I think it is.

The device was constructed by visual arts student Daniel de Bruin to be powered with minimal effort, he only needs to release a 15 kilogram weight and start the automated pulley system. De Bruin designed the machine because he wanted to play a larger part in what it created, rather than leave everything up to programmers and ‘soulless’ machines.

“The weight allows me to be still connected with the process. Because there is no external force involved like electricity it’s still me that’s making the print,” said de Bruin “By physically building and powering the machine the products that come out of it are the result of all the energy that has gone into it.”

The 3D printer is about as low-fi as you can get. The printer uses a plastic syringe filled with a quick-drying clay, creating a rough yet organic texture that ensures each printed object will be unique. The clay “filament” is extruded with a press that’s attached to the weight system. As the weight drops it depresses the syringe and extrudes more filament onto the round build platform. As the platform spins, the machine will create a cylinder shaped object, a small guide wire moves the build platform while the machine is printing in order to create variations in the shape.

De Bruin has experimented with adding pigment and colour to the clay material, and is also experimenting with using different materials to build with. He says that you can 3D print with his machine using clay, spackle, some bio plastics and even food products like pasta. Essentially, you can extrude anything that will fit through the 2mm print nozzle that doesn’t require a heating mechanism.

analog 3d printing color prints

The analog 3D printer will be on display at the Dutch design week in Eindhoven this year, so if you’re local you can find out more about the printer on de Bruin’s blogbefore you go check it out in person.

3dprintingindustry.com

by  | WED, JULY 16, 2014

Awesome 3D Printable ‘Life Hacks’

Today we’ll be taking a look at a few awesome 3D printable products which have officially reached ‘life hack’ status.

Amidst our more serious blog posts, this entry will be about easy-to-use, and more importantly, easy-to-make products which may not change the world – but will definitely help to put a smile on people’s faces.

Here’s one for the fruit-loving house party hosts – a printable tap which transforms a watermelon into a keg!

All you require are the beverages of your choice, and a knife to cut open the watermelon. Remove the melon chunks, add some ice, pop your tap into the makeshift fruit keg and prepare to conquer your thirst!

These fun products are great for a family day by the pool or to provide some much needed novelty at a house party.

The tap is the result of a combination between a team dedicated to life-hacking and a 3D printing company started by the people, for the people – Household Hackers and Robo 3D, respectively. According to 3DPrintingIndustry.com, this nifty tap was created using a Robo 3D R1 printer.

It can, of course, be used for more conventional purposes, but this one is by far the most awesome.

Next up, we’ve got a nifty little item that packs a musical punch. The ‘Kazoo‘ – a handheld instrument which requires users to hum into it – can provide hours of sweet-sounding fun.

A Grey Kazoo

(Image taken from Westhomasdesign.com)

Appropriate for both professional and amateurs alike, this small instrument definitely has mass appeal. It’s bound to have parents and neighbors across the globe in search for a fine set of ear plugs.


Hours have been spent tooting away at the Malta 3D Printing office, with a trusty kazoo never more than a few feet away!

According to the Guiness Book of World Records, on 14th March 2011, over 5,000 kazoo players teamed up to create their own rendition of one of Wagner’s greatest compositions, ‘The Ride of the Valkyries’. How many of those kazoos were 3D printed?

Moving on, we present to our viewers a simple, yet handy product which is bound to help people save a few extra pennies. Have you ever known there was some toothpaste left in the end of the tube, but couldn’t be bothered to awkwardly squeeze it out?

This trusty tube roller is meant for those occasions!

The Tube Roller in Action

(Image taken from Thingiverse.com)

Its incredibly easy-to-use, just fit it onto your desired tube and twist away. Guaranteed to squeeze every last drop out of your bothersome tubes. Don’t like the colour? Good thing Malta 3D Printing has dozens of alternatives.

The item pictured below is a cool alternative to that annoying bunch of keys on a ring. This 3D printable Swiss army knife can hold a number of keys, and should fit into a pocket nicely.

3D Printed Swiss Army Fold-out Keychain
(Image taken from Pinterest)

Say goodbye to that frustrating feeling you experience when you pull your mobile phone out of your pocket, only to realize its been scratched by your cumbersome key ring. Furthermore, printing this product in a nice bright colour will reduce the amount of time we spend looking for our keys!

Finally, we bring to you another tool that can help you tackle another common nuisance.

Cable Spool (Image taken from Thingiverse)

We’ve all gone through our fair share of mobile phones, speakers, and the myriad of other devices which come with 2-3 different cables per box. This cute cable spool allows you to store your wires in a practical way, and even when in use, guarantees things remain nice and tidy.

These spools can be easily stacked on top of each other or placed side-by-side neatly, as opposed to simply having a pile of wires left in a dusty box under your bed.

The examples listed here are only a speck of sand in the beach that is 3D printing. There are literally thousands of products out there that are can be immensely useful, or entertaining!

Don’t hesitate to contact Malta 3D Printing for any of the items listed above!

Why Hollywood’s Interest in 3D Printing Has Exploded

In theaters across the world, fans watch in amazement as lifelike costumes and props take centre stage in blockbuster movies. We’ve all been spoiled by advanced CGI (computer generated imagery), sitting back as we admire an ultra-realistic ocean glistening below a hovering alien mother-ship on screen.

The list of computer generated images is endless, and some movies rely entirely on these graphical reproductions.

Luckily, 3D printing is stepping in to add some much needed realness to our favourite flicks. The Iron Man movie series serves as a prime example – with an untold number of suits having been 3D printed by Legacy Effects for all 3 Iron Man titles.

One of Tony Stark’s Various Iron Man Suits

(Image taken from Wordofthenerdonline.com)

One can only imagine the amount of time and precision required to produce such works of art, and Lead Systems Engineer at Legacy Effects, Jason Lopes, can attest to this.

In this short interview with Bloomberg, Lopes gives a quick breakdown on why 3D printing is rapidly replacing older methods of costume creation.

Lopes states that, as a traditional special effects studio that once relied on high-quality animatronics and sculpting (to name a few), it was essential that they kept up to date with the latest technological trends.

Besides the impressive Iron Man suit on their resume, Legacy Effects have also produced models for other smash hits like Real Steel and Pacific Rim. The ‘Noisy Boy’ a fully-operational, hydraulic robot created for the Real Steel feature film, reportedly costed tens of thousands of dollars to complete.

The video below titled ‘3D Printing is Revolutionizing Special Effects’ sees the team behind Legacy Effects going in detail about how additive manufacturing is changing their work lives. Sculptors are now expanding their skill sets, substituting stone age sculpting for futuristic 3D printing.

While Legacy Effects remains an alpha male of the 3D printing prop and costume world, others are also making a name for themselves. According to 3DPrintingIndustry.com, Terry Gilliam – the world famous writer, director and actor – requested a cutting edge movie prop for his new movie, ‘The Zero Theorem.’

Of course – it had to be 3D printed – and Gilliam reportedly selected FATHOM and North Design Labs to craft this space-age device. North provided the creative mojo while FATHOM delivered in the technical department, a combination which resulted in this movie prop:

Movie Prop for Sci-Fi Flick ‘The Zero Theorem’

(Image taken from Article.wn.com)

This convincing, alien gadget gets plenty of screen time, housing a Samsung Galaxy Tablet and acting as a interactive mini-computer. According to 3DPrinterWorld.com, the entire device was 3D printed and assembled within a couple of days.

It was printed by an Objet500 Connex, a high-range printer capable of printing numerous materials in a single session.

The Awesome Objet500 Connex

(Image taken from Stratasys.com)

Not only are these exciting products being sold to mega-rich movie companies, but mega-rich customers too. According to techeblog.com, the cleverly named ‘Iron Man Factory’ situated in Shenzhen, China, is producing replicas that cost an arm and a leg.

At $35,000, the 3D printed, carbon-fiber Iron Man suit is hardly going to be selling like hotcakes, but is sure to tickle serious fans’ fancy.

Less wealthy Iron Man aficionados out there can also settle for the non-3D printed version for only $2,000 dollars.

These are only the beginnings of a very promising lunge into the movie industry. It’s no surprise Hollywood is taking notice of 3D printing – as time constraints become greater – faster, rapid prototyping methods of production will quickly gain precedence.

Albeit expensive, 3D printing has too many advantages not to be taken seriously.

Why Hollywood’s Interest in 3D Printing Has Exploded

In theaters across the world, fans watch in amazement as lifelike costumes and props take centre stage in blockbuster movies. We’ve all been spoiled by advanced CGI (computer generated imagery), sitting back as we admire an ultra-realistic ocean glistening below a hovering alien mother-ship on screen.

The list of computer generated images is endless, and some movies rely entirely on these graphical reproductions.

Luckily, 3D printing is stepping in to add some much needed realness to our favourite flicks. The Iron Man movie series serves as a prime example – with an untold number of suits having been 3D printed by Legacy Effects for all 3 Iron Man titles.

One of Tony Stark’s Various Iron Man Suits

(Image taken from Wordofthenerdonline.com)

One can only imagine the amount of time and precision required to produce such works of art, and Lead Systems Engineer at Legacy Effects, Jason Lopes, can attest to this.

In this short interview with Bloomberg, Lopes gives a quick breakdown on why 3D printing is rapidly replacing older methods of costume creation.

Lopes states that, as a traditional special effects studio that once relied on high-quality animatronics and sculpting (to name a few), it was essential that they kept up to date with the latest technological trends.

Besides the impressive Iron Man suit on their resume, Legacy Effects have also produced models for other smash hits like Real Steel and Pacific Rim. The ‘Noisy Boy’ a fully-operational, hydraulic robot created for the Real Steel feature film, reportedly costed tens of thousands of dollars to complete.

The video below titled ‘3D Printing is Revolutionizing Special Effects’ sees the team behind Legacy Effects going in detail about how additive manufacturing is changing their work lives. Sculptors are now expanding their skill sets, substituting stone age sculpting for futuristic 3D printing.

While Legacy Effects remains an alpha male of the 3D printing prop and costume world, others are also making a name for themselves. According to 3DPrintingIndustry.com, Terry Gilliam – the world famous writer, director and actor – requested a cutting edge movie prop for his new movie, ‘The Zero Theorem.’

Of course – it had to be 3D printed – and Gilliam reportedly selected FATHOM and North Design Labs to craft this space-age device. North provided the creative mojo while FATHOM delivered in the technical department, a combination which resulted in this movie prop:

Movie Prop for Sci-Fi Flick ‘The Zero Theorem’

(Image taken from Article.wn.com)

This convincing, alien gadget gets plenty of screen time, housing a Samsung Galaxy Tablet and acting as a interactive mini-computer. According to 3DPrinterWorld.com, the entire device was 3D printed and assembled within a couple of days.

It was printed by an Objet500 Connex, a high-range printer capable of printing numerous materials in a single session.

The Awesome Objet500 Connex

(Image taken from Stratasys.com)

Not only are these exciting products being sold to mega-rich movie companies, but mega-rich customers too. According to techeblog.com, the cleverly named ‘Iron Man Factory’ situated in Shenzhen, China, is producing replicas that cost an arm and a leg.

At $35,000, the 3D printed, carbon-fiber Iron Man suit is hardly going to be selling like hotcakes, but is sure to tickle serious fans’ fancy.

Less wealthy Iron Man aficionados out there can also settle for the non-3D printed version for only $2,000 dollars.

These are only the beginnings of a very promising lunge into the movie industry. It’s no surprise Hollywood is taking notice of 3D printing – as time constraints become greater – faster, rapid prototyping methods of production will quickly gain precedence.

Albeit expensive, 3D printing has too many advantages not to be taken seriously.

Printing Powers Into the Food Market

The food industry is the next branch of economy to benefit from 3D printing.

In 2013, NASA announced their interest in 3D printing food in space, allowing Systems and Material Research Corporation from Austin, Texas to begin developing methods for printing food in space. NASA’s interest into 3D printing speaks volumes about just how big additive manufacturing can grow to one day!

Back on Earth, others are busy focusing on 3D printers that can print chocolate, ice cream and more!

From ChocEdge in the UK, all the way to Global 3D Labs in India, the chocolate 3D printing trend is catching on quickly – promising to, in the future, produce results to rival the world’s best chocolatiers!

chocedge-emblem
An Accurately Crafted England Football Badge

(Image taken from 3DPrint.com)

Of course, this entry into the 3D printing market is still young, and won’t be replacing the hard-working men and women in the chocolate industry anytime soon.

However, as with any growing technology – this is one to look out for in the future.

Currently, time constraints will hold this technology back. According to 3DPrintingIndustry.com, it would take up to 40 minutes to produce a single plate of chocolate. While this is far from ideal, 3D printers still have a few tricks up their sleeve.

The Choc Creator from ChocEdge, founded by Dr. Liang Hao – claims to be more accurate than human hands, laying layers of chocolate at measurements of 0.5mm to 1.0mm. Having been on the market since 2012, its’ successor, the Choc Creator V2 has only recently been launched.

chocedge-printer
The Stylish Choc Creator V2

(Image taken from 3DPrint.com)

With the first entry marketed as a user-friendly yet capable device, the V2 (pictured below) offers technical supremacy – improving on feature’s such as the temperature control, according to 3ders.org. It also promises an improvement in accuracy, with printable chocolate tracks ranging from 0.45mm-1.3mm.

The price tag is heftier than its predecessor, but its promise to improve on an already capable machine should justify this. It was unveiled at the ‘2014 World 3D Printing Technology Industry Conference and Exhibition,’ which took place in China.

These printers allow users to deposit layers of chocolate on any surface desired – but what about as an ice cream topping?

Well, we’re not quite sure how that would work, but rest assured that other parties are working with ice cream and 3D printers. The idea is still in its infancy, after yet another group of promising students – this time from the world-renowned MIT – fiddled around with a printer until it was able to extrude ice-cream.

Check out the video below for a quick demonstration.

The students from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kyle Hounsell, Kristine Bunker and David Donghyun Kim – claimed to have taken interest in this novelty idea in a bid to excite children about 3D printing, as per 3ders.org.

“We felt that it was just as important to come up with a new technology as it was to interest the younger generation in pursuing science and technology so we can continue pushing the limits of what is possible,” Bunker told 3ders.org.

The three tech-junkies reportedly hacked a Solidoodle 4 3D printer, allowing for compatibility with a Cuisinart Ice Cream Maker.

Another promising food related 3D printer is the Foodini, by Natural Machines. It allows home cooks

to place (preferably healthy) foodstuffs into open containers which are then pumped out via a syringe.

Its’ Kickstarter campaign was unfortunately unsuccessful, but still managed to raise a little more than $80,000 dollars, leaving it slightly off its $100,000 target mark. While this is indeed a revolutionary idea that needs time to be perfected, the decision to market it as a way to change how we prepare our food is slightly premature.

The Foodini

(Image taken from naturalmachines.com)

Of course, the Foodini is changing the way we fundamentally prepare dishes, but it isn’t necessarily making us eat healthier or save time with cooking.

Similar to other 3D devices, Foodini has its own online database where users are able to download different shapes and patterns for the variety of sweet and savory dishes. Powered by Android, the Foodini comes equipped with Wi-Fi and a 7-inch touchscreen.

3D Printing Food foodini 3D Printer
Well-crafted Edibles Made by the Foodini

(Image taken from 3dprintingindustry.com)

The creators of Foodini, Lynette Kucsma and Emilio Sepulvedu, plan for their creation to be as popular as the microwave one day.

According to 3dprint.com, they also aspire to create ‘3D printing ovens’ one day. It’s difficult to imagine this materializing anytime soon, but it’s exciting to think that 3D printing technology will infiltrate such a core aspect of our lives – improving and revolutionizing the way we think about food.