The fully-body Iron Man suit!

An Incredible 1.8 Miles of Filament Were Used to Create This Fully-Body Iron Man Suit!

http://3dprint.com/48264/3d-printed-iron-man-suit/

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One of the areas which has seen substantial benefit from 3D printing is that of the prop and costume industry. Whether created for movie and set production or printed out as simply a hobby, the design attributes that 3D printing has to offer are taking prop and costume making to the next level.

Over the last 13 months we have seen numerous body suits and masks from popular movies 3D printed. We’ve seen entire 3D Printed Alien Xenomorph suitscreated, as well as life-sized suits such as the Hulkbuster from the Iron Man movies 3D printed and then painted. Additive manufacturing enables fine intricate details which could not have been accomplished without great expense using traditional forms of subtractive manufacturing.

In what may be one of the most detailed and largest prop/costume projects we have seen to date, a 20-year-old Marvel Comics enthusiast named Ross Wilkes has created a 3D printed life-sized Iron Man suit.

The project — which Wilkes started way back in 2013 as part of his odd, yet very creative, New Year’s resolution — has taken 14 months to finally culminate in a complete suit reminiscent of Tony Stark’s famous armor.

“Building my own Iron Man suit has been an incredible challenge,” says Wilkes. “Before I could start, I had to learn the basics of 3D printing and was able to pick up the rest along the way. I’m thrilled with what I’ve been able to create using only a 3D printer, and to be able to see the complete suit now is incredible.”

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‘Incredible’ may be an understatement. Wilkes, who used only one 3D printer, a Velleman K8200, which was purchased in kit form back in 2013 and assembled soon thereafter, used quite a bit of filament for this project. A total of 32 1kg-spools of filament were used, equating to approximately a 1.8-mile-long strand. Because the Velleman 8200 has a build envelope of just 20 x 20 x 20 cm, Wilkes had to 3D print the suit in hundreds of separate pieces before fusing them all together, sort of like a puzzle.

Velleman 8200 3D Printer

Three different colors of filament were used for the main body of the suit — red, gold, and gray — and it even features the familiar chest repulsor transmitter, centered at the sternum area. Unlike many past projects we have seen, Wilkes did not paint or use any finishing techniques on this project, relying on the colors of the filament to do their job. As you can see from the images provided to us by Wilkes, he’s done a remarkable job at realizing an accurate rendition of the suit, one which appears to be 3D printed, yet still remains a very accurate representation of the suit we are all familiar with from comic books and movies.

Let’s hear your thoughts on this incredible 3D print in the 3D printed Iron Man Suit forum thread on 3DPB.com.

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3DPRINT.COM
by  | MARCH 3, 2015
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3D printed props and costumes

Sky News Features A Few Awesome 3D Printed Movie Props

http://goo.gl/mFyFD7

Film studios are turning to special effects companies with 3D printers for quick turnarounds of detailed outfits.

Movie props and costumes are getting more elaborate and intricate because of an unlikely new character in Hollywood – the 3D printer.

Film studios are increasingly turning to special effects companies with 3D printers so that outfits can be created more quickly and with some impressive detail.

The process isn’t cheap – but there’s less of a need for actors to stand around nearly naked in plaster casts anymore.

Grant Pearmain, director at FB FX, told Sky News the design process has been revolutionised by the technology.

He said: “A 3D printer can make something that a normal person just can’t physically make, by the way it prints, kind of overlaps and underlaps.”

Among the many blockbuster movie pieces co-designed by Mr Pearmain’s company is the helmet worn by actor Chris Pratt when he starred as Star Lord in Guardians Of The Galaxy.

It was printed ready to wear straight away.

The A-lister’s co-star Djimon Hounsou – who played the baddie Korath – also received the 3D printer treatment.

Mr Pearmain added: “The designer wanted a look on that film of a kind of armour that you just wouldn’t traditionally be able to make – it would be really impossible to do.

“We worked quite hard to create 3D-printed parts that were strong enough that that entire costume could be built that way.”

Parts of Christian Bale’s helmet and armour, as he played Moses in Exodus: Gods And Kings, were also 3D printed.

Gary Miller, head of 3D printing facility IPF, told Sky News: “It’s got to the stage now where if you don’t have access to this technology you’re kind of working with one arm tied behind your back.

“It’s so fast. We’re printing in the evening on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, and supplying the studios on Monday morning to go fitting straight onto the actors.”

The method also means special visual effects designers in the UK can send over prototypes to US studios for approval more quickly.

However, 3D printing has been criticised for being expensive. There have been rumblings over potential job losses too.

Technician Jack Rothwell operates a digital 3D body scanner for actors at Shepperton Studios.

He said: “I think there are fears, I think especially for people who haven’t grown up with computers who are traditional model makers … it’s a struggle to incorporate this into their work flow.”

However, film journalist Tom Butler, told us the situation may balance itself out in the long run.

“You will always need a skilled engineer at the front end to design the thing in the first place.”

And as the cost drops and the tech improves further, there are high hopes for the future.

He added: “I don’t think it’s too far-fetched to think that in the future Star Wars films the storm troopers will be wearing 3D-printed costumes.”

NEWS.SKY.COM
by Gemma Morris, Sky News Presenter | Friday 20 February 2015 20:30, UK

3D printed Assassin’s Creed Blade

If you’re an Assassin’s Creed fan the signature retractable blade must have fascinated you at some point.

Farell Rozan loved it so much he designed and printed this working prop based on ‘Black Flag’. Follow the link below to check out his design in more detail!

http://3dprint.com/18863/assassins-creed-blade-3d-print/

We have seen our fair share of 3D printed props based on those found within video games. In fact, there are a whole slew of cosplayers who rely on many of these props to express themselves in a type of performance art. 3D printing has taken prop making, added precision and complexity, and has allowed for much more realistic pieces to be made.

One such piece was recently created by a man named Farell Rozan, based off of one of his favorite games, Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag. The game, set in the early 18th century during the Golden Age of Piracy, and developed by Ubisoft Montreal, pits players against one another or the computer, in a fun, intriguing, stealth action-adventure.

Rozan had recently purchased a Flashforge Creator pro 3D printer and wanted to create something fun, yet a bit challenging for his first project. What better an item to choose than the Assassin’s Creed blade.

“The Assassins Creed Blade is actually my first major 3D print project. I’ve been wanting to explore printing a model that has a mechanism, with moving parts, plus utilizing dual printing,” explained Rozan to 3DPrint.com. “Since it’s my first [project], I wanted to make something simple that has a trigger and performs an action. Making a gun requires a lot of mechanical parts so that’s not an option for a beginner. I’ve been playing the Assassin’s Creed: Black Flag, and I thought the hidden blade was perfect for the job! I’ve always admired the mechanism of the blade and how stealthy it is.”

Once this decision was made, Rozan scoured the internet for the perfect model. After searching Thingiverse and Youtube for quite a while, all the models he found were quite large, needing a thick handle to enclose the mechanisms required for the retraction of the blade. Unfulfilled, Rozan decided that the only way he was going to 3D print a blade he’d be satisfied with, was to design it himself.

“Using Google Sketchup, I designed the model that utilizes a rubber band and a trigger-release in the mechanism,” explained Rozan. “With parts that hold the blade sturdily during extraction, and a few braces to hold the body frame together.”

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Being a newcomer to 3D printing, Rozan had difficulty calibrating his printer and had to reexamine several areas of his design. One of the main design flaws he had experienced, was that of not allowing for the proper amount of gap tolerance. Additionally, it was difficult for Rozan to figure out the correct amount of infill to use so that the blade, which was printed with the more tolerant ABS thermoplastic, would not bend or snap very easily. After his 4th design, and learning a great deal about modelling and printing in three dimensions, he felt he had perfected his creation. Judging by the images and videos Rozan has provided us, I think he may be right. Rozan discussed with us what he has learned from this project:

“It’s better to simplify the parts to allow some tolerance in minor print defects. Also, it’s always an option to fix some model parts during the post process rather than fixing the 3D model for accuracy. Printer calibration is key. There’s a lot of times where I thought the defects came from errors from my 3D model, but it turned out it was due to the printer calibration. The orientation of your model while printing is also key for making high strength parts.”

In total, the final blade took about 12 hours to print out on the Flashforge Creator pro. Once printed, it took Rozan an additional 4 hours for post-processing. The entire blade is made up of 42 parts, which include rubber bands and wrist straps in addition to the 3D printed pieces. Let’s hear your thoughts on Rozan’s creation, in the 3D Printed Assassin’s Creed Blade forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3DPRINT.COM
by  | OCTOBER 12, 2014