Shuty 3D printed pistol

http://3dprint.com/89919/shuty-hybrid-3d-printed-pistol/

3dp_3dprintedgun_liberator

The Shuty Hybrid 3D Printed 9mm Pistol Raises Questions About 3D Printed Gun Control

I say this as both a firearm enthusiast and an advocate for strong firearm regulation. It is becoming evident that there is a point when we as a society are just going to have to accept that 3D printed weapons are not going to disappear behind walls of legislation. Will that point be when entire guns can easily be 3D printed and constructed at home? Because it is pretty evident at this point that 3D printable firearms will be here soon, and both sides of the controversial issue are going to have to stop chipping away at each other’s platforms and start a real conversation about what kind of society we will have when they get here.

At this point, we have all heard of the Liberator created by Cody Wilson, the original 3D printed handgun that got gun nuts overly excited and anti-gun nuts wildly up in arms. For those of us in the middle, realistically the Liberator is a single shot firearm completely made of plastic and is probably not much of a real threat to anyone. And I don’t believe that even with subsequent upgrades and redesigns that have turned it into a much more reliable and dependable firearm, that has really changed. But firearms enthusiasts with 3D printers obviously weren’t going to stop with the Liberator, and they have turned to designing hybrid firearms made of 3D printed parts combined with more durable parts culled from traditionally manufactured guns.

One of the most sophisticated and impressive hybrid designs out there is the Shuty, a 9mm semiauto based on a combination of parts from a standard AR-15 and the homemade firearm designs of P.A. Luty. The design for the Shuty combines a metal bolt, an AR fire-control group and the barrel of a Glock combined with a 3D printed bolt carrier, upper and lower receivers and even a 3D printed magazine.

The 3D printed parts are all made from standard PLA printed on an Orion from SeeMeCNC. The design intentionally combines metal parts that will be exposed to repeated use with its printed parts that will encounter less wear and tear. With so many plastic parts the Shuty is obviously going to have a rather short period of usability, but because of the clever mixing of metal and printed parts it will be far longer than the one-and-done Liberator.

The unassembled Shuty.

One of the fears of those in favor of banning 3D printed guns is that they might be used in crimes, mass shootings or even for political assassinations. Anyone who has used or 3D printed a gun, regardless of their stance on the issue, is going to be able to tell you with some authority that that isn’t a fear that is based in reality. In terms of actual, practical usability the Shuty really isn’t going to score many points there, especially with no stock or sights. It also looks like a brick, and isn’t going to be comfortably or surreptitiously tucked into any waistbands without looking like an idiot.

But while the Shuty isn’t the prettiest gun on the block, it is certainly a cleverly designed one, and most importantly not only does it work, but it actually works pretty well. But it is still a work in progress, so it will undoubtedly be improved with each new iteration. So while right now 3D printed guns are probably the last firearm anyone would choose when planning to commit a crime, that is likely to change at some point. Especially as more advanced 3D printing materials far stronger than standard PLA become available.

3dp_3dprintedgun_shuty_assembled

However, as Derwood says in the description of one of his test videos, at this point the Shuty “is now functioning perfect” and certainly looks intimidating despite its clumsy appearance. If the plastic parts are replaced with more durable and advanced 3D printing materials then it could become a little more of a threat. And even now it is an excellent example of a homemade firearm proof of concept.

Gun control advocates insist that eliminating guns in the United States would save lives and reduce (our already record low) crime rates, and they have the Facebook memes about gun availability in European countries to prove it. But you simply can’t erase the last 200 years of our history and culture, and those same European countries don’t have the right to own firearms written into their constitutions. Not to mention the fact that there are an estimated 8.8 guns for each 10 people in the country, so even banning guns isn’t going to result in a gun shortage. They’re going to have to understand that guns aren’t going away, and neither is the culture that surrounds them.

But firearms enthusiasts and gun owners are also going to have to face up to some hard realities. They can quote the second amendment all that they want, while trying to pretend that the words “well regulated” aren’t in it, but it simply does not mean all or nothing no matter how much you want it to. The Supreme Court has already ruled that regulation doesn’t violate the Constitution, and because of the fragmented nature of our country, each state sets its own gun laws that are often wildly out of sync with each other. Rather than fighting the inevitability of gun regulation, the smarter move is to implement sane, logical and effective legislation that preserves gun owners’ rights but puts a system in place to help prevent those who would misuse them from getting their hands on them.

What Congress thinks a 3D printed gun is.

As much as both sides of the gun debate, as well as the 3D printed gun issue, want their problems with it to go away, that simply isn’t going to happen. The fact that both sides can be less than mature when responding to the opinions of the other certainly isn’t helping settle the issue either. (As I can attest with the hate mail from both sides that I often receive after I write anything on the issue.) Ultimately, some things are going to have to change with the way that we debate and discuss the politics of firearm ownership, especially as it relates to the 3D printing industry. If we don’t, then history has taught us that the option for us to debate the issue is going to be replaced with poorly thought-out laws rammed through Congress.

How long until laws are passed requiring manufacturers to include blocks for 3D printed firearm parts? The fact that it is almost un-implementable wouldn’t alter the fact that it has already happened with other technologies. And beyond guns, I’m extremely uncomfortable with the law regulating what someone can and cannot print on their printer. It isn’t as far a leap from preventing the printing of gun parts to preventing materials considered obscene, or preventing trademarked materials from being printed at home. 3D printing is still highly emergent technology that, while opening entirely new possibilities, is still struggling to find its proper place in our world. Things rarely go well when governments step in to regulate technology that they don’t understand.

Let us know what you think of the 3D printed firearm issue (or call me a pinko scum or a fascist or a micro-penised gun nut, depending on your political ideology) over on our Shuty 3D Printed 9mm Pistol forum thread at 3DPB.com.

3dprint.com

by  | AUGUST 19, 2015

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3D Printed RayGun Shoots 7 Rubber Bands!

http://3dprint.com/62498/3d-printed-rubber-band-raygun/

raygun

This 3D Printed RayGun Shoots 7 Rubber Bands in Quick Succession

Creativity is endless when a skilled 3D artist is provided with a 3D printer, allowing him/her to turn their virtual models into tangible, real life products. The technology has brought to life some incredible inventions and innovations which have greatly enhanced the lives of others. At the same time, 3D printing has also allowed for these creative minds to have a little fun in fabricating things that would have only been dreamt of a few years ago.

For one freelance 3D artist, named Aiman Akhtar, who specializes in modeling characters, 3D printing allowed him to create a toy gun unlike anything we’ve seen before. Akhtar, who writes a monthly column for 3D World Magazine on the topic of 3D printing, seems to thoroughly enjoy the challenges that come with designing new products.

“Every month, I challenge myself to print something I have no clue how to make, then figure it out and take the readers on the journey with me. In the past months I’ve created an iPhone case, bobbleheads, fully articulated characters, 3D printed trophies, eyewear, and am currently tackling jewelry and wearables,” Akhtar tells 3DPrint.com.

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When you think of 3D printing, there are a ton of designs out there for objects that are cool to look at, but only a small percentage of the objects out there are actually functional. One of Akhtar’s latest projects was for something that not only is fully functional, but something that is a ton of fun to play with as well. He designed and 3D printed a rubber band raygun.

“I recently moved to Los Angeles and decided to visit the Rose Bowl Flea Market which takes place bi-weekly in Pasadena,” Akhtar told us. “There, on display, I saw some hand made, wooden, rubber band shooters and instantly knew I had to make my own custom 3D printed version. That’s the great thing about 3D printing, inspiration can come from anywhere and it’s the fastest way to go from an idea to a prototype. I took the toy apart that night and started redesigning it for 3D print.”

To design the gun, Akhtar searched around the internet for photo references of other raygun designs. He then used Photoshop to sketch out his various ideas. Once he had come up with an idea that satisfied him, he used ZBrush to sculpt the shape what he needed, before exporting it as an OBJ file into MODO to start building its functional parts. After all of the parts were designed, the models were brought back into ZBrush to key them all together, before exporting each part out as a separate STL file.

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In all, there were 21 separate pieces that needed to be 3D printed, including the trigger, hammer, barrel, sights, grip, internal keys, and more. Akhtar tells us that he could have easily 3D printed it in just five or six parts, and even perhaps as a single object, but he had a desire to make it as colorful as he could. Breaking it down into many individual pieces allowed him to do so.

Surprisingly, Akhtar doesn’t own a 3D printer himself. Instead, for this project, he used 3D Hubs to find an affordable printing service close to his home.

“I landed upon a small buiness called Cybertech, and submitted an order though 3D Hubs to their print lead, Israel Pena,” Akhtar tells us. “I gave clear specifications and color notes on how I wanted each part printed, and Israel took care of the rest. He used a MakerBot 5th generation, switching out the various color plastic spools as specified.”

After receiving the parts back, Akhtar put them together but found that the trigger was not flexible enough. It was too weak to stop the hammer, and upon trying to fire the gun, it snapped off. He quickly redesigned the trigger, and just as quickly had the new design printed out by Cybertech. He tells us that it “worked brilliantly” after receiving and assembling the revised trigger. It can shoot up to 7 rubber bands in quick succession, and it is one of the most beautiful toy guns you will ever see.

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The complete detailed tutorial on making this gun can be found in 3D World Magazine, issue 194, which can be purchased through iTunes or ordered as a physical copy through MyFavouriteMagazines. What do you think about this incredible design? Discuss in the 3D Printed Rubber Band Raygun forum thread on 3DPB.com.

3dprint.com

by  | MAY 5, 2015

AR-15’s bigger brother means a new 3D printed gun

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/some-guys-just-made-a-heavier-caliber-3-d-printed-gun-323e7cca17e3

Some Guys Just Made a Heavier-Caliber 3D Printed Gun. It’s the AR-15’s bigger brother

In March, a Website dedicated to 3D-printing firearms announced one of its members had developed a lower receiver for a Colt CM901 rifle. It’s a small — but evolutionary — step toward the development of firearms that pretty much anyone can download off the Internet.

The CM901 is the bigger, badder brother of the ubiquitous AR-15. The CM901 has a similar design, but fires the heavier and more powerful 7.62-millimeter bullet, resulting in greater range and killing power.

A group of gunsmiths developed the CM901 lower receiver and uploaded an animated gif of a live-fire test. The clip is five seconds long.

The CM901 is a modular design, so the rifle can shoot lighter 5.56-millimeter rounds, too. The group used a XYZ Da Vinci printer, which retails for around $500.

By the standards of 3D printers, that’s cheap.

Remember — this is an evolutionary development.

Downloadable blueprints for 3D-printed AR-15 lower receivers appeared on hobbyist forums several years ago. All you need is a 3D printer and enough thermoplastic, and you can build yourself one.

Cody Wilson of the gun rights organization Defense Distributed — which built the first fully 3D-printed pistol — developed an AR-15 lower receiver that can fire hundreds of rounds.

But it took a lot of trial and error, because the receiver’s components had to withstand recoil and the stresses from moving parts. Earlier version of Wilson’s AR-15 lower receiver broke after firing only a few bullets.

Rifles chambered for 7.62-millimeter are heavier — usually by about four pounds — and suffer from even more recoil than the AR-15.

It’s not clear if the 3D-printed lower for the CM901 will hold up after more than few seconds of rapid fire. All we see is a short clip.

“It has been tested, fired with little to no issues,” the group stated.

In any case, advances in technology hold the promise of making durable, reliable parts for 3D-printed guns. That means more powerful guns … that last longer.

Recently, 3D-printing start-up MarkForged invented a printer called theMark One, which can make objects out of carbon fiber, Kevlar, fiberglass and nylon.

Carbon fiber is a composite material made from threads of carbon bound by a plastic resin. It’s known for being tough and lightweight — and can replace metal in everything from aircraft to cricket bats.

Carbon fiber exists in the AR-15, but the composite is limited to the rifle’s hand guard and butt stock.

But MarkForged has claimed its carbon fiber has a greater strength-to-weight ratio than 6061 T-6 aluminum — which comprises standard AR-15 and CM901 lower receivers.

Which sounds perfect for making guns. Buy a printer, load it with carbon fiber, input a file with the specifications for a lower receiver, press a button … and wait.

Wilson said he ordered a MarkOne at the introductory price of $8,000, but the company told him earlier in March that his order would not be honored. MarkForged’s terms of agreement forbid customers from using its printers to make guns, the company claimed.

That was not actually true, but Defense Distributed was out a printer all the same. Wilson promptly went ahead and posted a video on YouTube offering a $15,000 reward to anyone who could send him a MarkOne. Four days later, the gunsmiths sent a cryptic tweet — “We have it.”

Defense Distributed has been quiet since, no doubt busy experimenting with guns made out of carbon fiber.

Carbon fiber might be the answer to many a 3D gunsmith’s prayers, but it still doesn’t mean you can print an entire rifle with it. For one, high-caliber barrels must be metal, or they’ll break.

At least one company advertises carbon fiber barrels, but a closer look reveals they’re simply steel barrels reinforced with carbon fiber.

Still, the technical challenges are only part of the point.

Desktop weaponeers focus on printing lower receivers — because they’re subject to federal regulations. You can’t make a working gun without a lower receiver — and they usually come with a serial number stamped on them.

As far as the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms is concerned, a gun’s lower receiver is the gun. Everything else, including the barrel, you can buy over the counter with no questions asked.

But private citizens in the United States have the right to make their own firearms — and lower receivers — without any oversight from the federal government.

It’s a complicated process and takes metal-drilling machine tools. A 3D printer simplifies this process, and could allow citizens to build their own rifles without registering them, going through background checks or waiting periods.

We don’t know if Defense Distributed will succeed in printing a carbon fiber lower receiver. But at some point, rapid advances in 3D-printing technology ensure that someone will.

medium.com

by Kyle Mizokami | 

3D printed gun as a form of protest

Protesters in Texas Took to the Streets Armed with a 3D Printer in A Bid to Stir Things Up

http://3dprint.com/37168/ghost-gunner-texas-open-carry/

photo by come and take it texas

It’s a controversial issue, and activists are using a tool which sprung from the 3D printed gun movement to draw attention to their stance on gun rights.

A group of gun rights activists gathered outside the Texas State Capitol in Austin yesterday intent on pushing lawmakers to relax open-carry gun laws, and the “featured attraction” was a CNC device which uses 3D printed parts, the Ghost Gunner.  With this device the activists proceeded to ‘3D print’ a gun right in front of the Capitol building.

The gathering was organized by Come And Take It Texas, or CATI, and the groupsays it’s “been the front line for gun rights since their inception two years ago.” The bill was filed by state Rep. Jonathan Stickland, R-Bedford, and he says BH 195 is aimed at eliminating the state’s handgun licensing requirements.

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As odd as it may seem given the state’s reputation, Texas is one of only six US states where citizens are not allowed to openly carry handguns.

As for the Ghost Gunner, it’s made by Defense Distributed, the Austincompany famous, or infamous depending on your position on the matter, for 3D printing the Liberator plastic gun. The Ghost Gunner is a small CNC device capable of machining a receiver for the AR-15.

A large share of the controversy began with the 3D printing of the Liberator, and the desktop CNC Ghost Gunner is a direct descendant of that effort by Defense Distributed.

“Anybody can purchase one of these to print firearms in their own homes,” Murdoch Pizgatti, president of CATI, told NBC News.

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The Ghost Gunner uses an aluminum block that’s referred to as “80 percent lower” – a piece which can be purchased for less than $100 – to fabricate a working receiver in around 15 minutes. Defense Distributed calls the Ghost Gunner project “a non-profit, open source hardware effort.” They add that the Ghost Gunner schematics and design files will be published into the public domain.

The device uses 3D printable jigs to hold the receiver part in place as milling steps are completed. When milling an 80% AR-15 lower receiver, the company says two jig pieces are required to secure the lower in place as the ‘trigger pocket’ is milled, and two more jig pieces are used to drill the trigger pin holes.

Defense Distributed says that, in general, using their device to manufacture semi-automatic firearms like the AR-15 lower receivers is legal for private individuals. They add that some states and municipalities restrict either the manufacture of certain firearms, or more recently, the personal manufacture of a firearm with a 3D printer or CNC machine.

As for federal laws, they prohibit the manufacture of firearms for future sale without a Federal Firearms License. According to the ATF, allowing others the use personal CNC equipment may constitute manufacturing, so Defense Distributed tells Ghost Gunner owners to avoid printing firearms for other individuals.

Let’s hear your thoughts on what, if anything, should be done by authorities to make sure these weapons do not fall in the hands of crazed maniacs. Discuss this story in the 3D Printed Guns Add to Open Carry Debate in Texas thread on 3DPB.com.

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3DPRINT.COM
by  | JANUARY 14, 2015

Gun fanatic

A Perfect Ornament for Your Average Gun Fanatic 🙂

http://goo.gl/cYf5Kq

Mikhail Kalashnikov

Mikhail Kalashnikov was a “self-taught tinkerer” who used his mechanical skills and a study of weaponry to design and build the gun that changed the way wars are fought.  His AK-47, also known around the world as the “Kalashnikov” in honor of its creator, is a 7.62×39mm assault rifle renowned for its deadly reliability and ubiquity as a military tool.

And now, six decades after Kalashnikov built the first of his prototypes, it is the most popular and widely used assault rifle in the world. Its reliability under harsh conditions, low production cost, and ease of use has led various AK-derived rifles to be the most-produced assault rifle type in history.

As a result, the AK-47 has become a sort of talisman, an icon which represents everything from gun-rights freedom to the power of revolutionary forces around the globe. And it’s also becoming more and more common to see 3D printed guns.

Now a reddit user, EasilyUsed, has created a full-sized toy replica of this most infamous piece of military hardware.

Modeled in Blender and 3D printed on a MakerBot Replicator 1 and Flashforge Creator II in ABS at .3mm layer height with a 10% infill, EasilyUsed says a total of six print jobs were need to print the nine pieces that make up the replica. He adds that the replica took a total print time of some 35 hours.

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The resulting pieceweighs 1 pound, and the parts were permanently ‘welded’ together with acetone. The ‘welding’ was done using an ABS slurry first which was made up of color-matched bits of ABS dissolved in acetone.

“I prefer just using a paintbrush to apply plain acetone to my parts, let them melt a bit, then press them together,” he says. “I feel it’s easier to work with raw acetone than the thick abs slurry, as well as not needing to have slurry color matched to every filament I use.”

While he says he did have “some trouble with warping and splitting on the largest parts despite enclosed printers,” he solved that by making corrections after printing with acetone and clamps.

“None of the parts are moving, but I’d like to redesign so the trigger functions, the clip is removable and the bolt cycles,” he says. “I’d also probably break the parts down to smaller sizes and different orientations to decrease warping and splitting and make them fit in my acetone vapor bath.”

IF

He says the entire piece took just 1/2 of a 1kg roll of filament and cost around $10-15 to complete, depending, of course, on the prices your supplier charges.  If you’d like to check out the laws regarding toys like this, you can find some useful information here.

“Yeah, it’s kind of an art piece on its own since it doesn’t have any function to it; the frozen treats (in the photo) are just an unrelated painting in my studio that had good lighting,” he says.

What do you think about the 3D printing of guns, either as working firearms or as toys? You can weigh in with your opinion in the 3D Printed Kalashnikov forumthread on 3DPB.com.

3DPRINT.COM
by  | DECEMBER 30, 2014

3D printed AR 15 lower gun

This goes to show everyone that 3D printed guns are not as straightforward and simple as everybody thinks they are. However, does the concept still frighten you?

http://3dprint.com/22948/3d-printed-ar-15-lower-gun/

Banana to scale

Shots have been fired! And with great interest, hobbyists who are not only 3D printing enthusiasts but 3D printing gun enthusiasts, are taking note of the latest news on the WarFairy 3D printable AR-15 lower, with video and explanation of the process provided by Reddit user schlauncha.

Talk began when WarFairy released a 3D printable gun design on Reddit, which still required some refinement, as well as a conversion kit. Known as the Hanuman AR-15 Bullpup, it does not have a safety, and requires the user to operate at his own risk. The specs state that it should work without issue, but that was not the case for schlauncha.

In using the open source design for the WarFairy Charon, schlauncha added some of his own modifications, to include:

  • Different and larger buttpad for his desired length of pull.gun
    • Beefed up front takedown pin area and bolt release pin area.
    • 3D printing with ABS using his Da Vinci XYZPrinter 1.0, consuming approximately 1 spool of 600g.

Due to the amount of backlash in recent press over 3D printing of guns, it is important to note that schlauncha lives in an area where it is legal for him to 3D print the gun, as well as to possess it.

“This firearm conforms to all ATF rules like any other AR15 lower,” points out schlauncha.

Schlauncha encounters some challenges, but optimism reigns with his project as he employs the ‘try, try again’ mission statement and keeps refining and fixing the 3D printed gun with each issue that crops up. His first challenge was in trying to open the binder tube which he speculated must have been pushed wrong or perhaps he ‘thumped it’ as he ‘split it in half through the trigger pin.’ In need of actetone to make a fix, schlauncha had to hold off on firing the gun until the next day.

after six shots it split vertically through the rear takedown pin as shown here

All in all, the 3D printed gun held out better than schlauncha had expected; however, once the gun was glued back together, he noted some continuing problems: “The gun still has some issues with failure to feed due to drag in the buffer tube, and after six shots it split vertically through the rear takedown pin. But, being 3D printed ABS, I believe I can just get some acetone down into that split and have it re-bond successfully.”

His final conclusion was that it was probably time to retire this initial model and move on to a new 3D printed revision. Discuss the process–and the issues Schlauncha encountered with his 3D printed gun in the Modified Warfairy Charon forum at 3DPB.com.

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3DPRINT.COM
by  | NOVEMBER 10, 2014

3D printed paper airplane machine gun

The sort of 3D printed gun we can all enjoy shooting 🙂

http://www.businessinsider.com/3d-printed-paper-airplane-ma…

paper airplane machine gun gun

Amid concerns about 3D printed guns, one man has made a prototype of a weapon everyone can agree on: a 3D printed machine gun that shoots paper airplanes.

YouTube user Papierfliegerei fabricated most of the parts for the whimsical weapon using the German 3D printing website fabberhouse.de, and acquired the rest from the Internet and his local hardware store.

The gun feeds paper into it in a flat sheet and folds the paper airplanes itself.

BUSINESSINSIDER.COM
by  | Oct 8, 2014, 12:31 PM