Italian fashion wear

Breathing Life Into High Quality Italian Fashion Wear

http://www.cnet.com/news/multimaterial-3d-printing-brings-italian-fashion-to-life/

Gruppo Meccaniche Luciani has created a six-piece fashion collection built using multi-material 3D printing.
Multimaterial 3D printing is opening up a brave new world of fashion possibilities, and the Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 is leading the charge. Gruppo Meccaniche Luciani – a Corridonia, Italy-based manufacturer of moulds and other tools for making footwear – has designed a collection to showcase its new service called rapid prototyping.

“3D printing enables us to offer a new line of items to our clients. We can design and 3D print realistic prototypes in a matter of hours and incorporate any required design iterations before starting full production,” said Gruppo Meccaniche Luciani’s Elisa Luciani.

The collection consists of six items: thee pairs of shoes, a bustier, a bracelet and a rigid, single-material handbag, designed to showcase the intricate work that can be achieved with 3D printing – both with multiple materials, in different colours and textures, achieved with the printer’s triple-jet design; and in the complexity of the designs themselves.

The bustier features a cutout in the middle, bordered by black curves contrasted with a pointed prism pattern, and filled with curved lines, in a soft, flexible material – Stratasys’ family of rubber-like materials – that is more comfortable to wear than hard PLA material.

“Our main requirement was to produce a highly-detailed, realistic wearable. Using Stratasys’ materials, we were able to 3D print a top with varying levels of softness that could be worn in direct contact with the skin,” Luciani explained. “The ability to combine rigid and soft materials simultaneously is unique and would have otherwise entailed manual manufacture and individual assembly of each material.

Meanwhile, one of the pairs of shoes is printed in both rigid and soft materials in two colours for a visually compelling, brightly coloured look; another has a complex, angular latticed design, which fits around the curved shape of the shoe itself.

“When designing the shoe we were concerned about the rigidity and resistance of the heels, but the 3D printer’s ability to combine varying densities of rigid and soft material simultaneously enabled us to manufacture the whole shoe in one print,” Luciani said.

CNET.COM
by | March 9, 2015 10:58 PM PDT
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3D printed nano structures

The Biggest Nano Structures in the World Have Been Created Thanks to 3D Printing

http://3dprint.com/49406/tetra-3d-printer-record/

TETRA's Nano Structure 3D Printer

When it comes to 3D printing, there is a lot of talk about large scale printing. In this past year alone, we have seen things as large as a house 3D printed using the technology that we have today. The world has a fascination with large things, thus this is why there has been so much media attention surrounding the 3D printing of cars, houses, and other large structures as of late. However, equally impressive, although not quite as ‘sexy’ to the mainstream media, is the 3D printing of nano structures. These are structures that are extremely tiny, and provide for the potential of creating new materials, new medical devices, and more. The possibilities are really endless.

There are several companies which currently have the technology to utilize lasers to 3D print nano structures. However, today 3DPrint.com learns that one company has just broken a record for creating a machine that allows them to 3D print ‘the largest’ nano structures yet. Isn’t that an oxymoron?

“We, the company TETRA in Germany, have developed a nano-3D-printer,” Norman Petzold of Tetra tells 3DPrint.com. “It is based on two-photon-lithography (2PP) and is able to write nano structures with resolutions of 400 nm. There are already printers, which are based on 2PP and which have the same resolutions, but the new thing on our nano structures is that they are ten times bigger than the current [technology]. Current nano structures are available at 2 or 3 mm height. Our structures can be [up to] 30 x 30 x 30 mm³ with a resolution of 400 nm. This is current world record.”

tetra2

The process, which TETRA’s printers use, is called Two-Photo-Polymerization (2PP) and it is a lithographic technique where photo-sensitive, polymerizable liquids such as hydrogels are cross-linked using an ultra-short-pulse-laser. This laser cures the material, allowing for final products which are incredibly small in size, yet also very intricate in detail.

10mm x 10mm x 10mm cube printed by TETRA's new technology

Some of the materials available to print with using 2PP include acrylate monomers, and biomolecules. This technology is very useful for creating products which can be used for:

  • Implants
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Cell Biology
  • Drug Discovery
  • High resolution cell scaffolds

The laser used within these machines feature a wavelength of 780 nm and a pulse duration of less than 120fs. This provides for very minute detail in a tiny space.

It should be interesting to see how this technology progresses in the coming years and how various businesses and institutions put it to use. Allowing for the 3D printing of small, detailed objects could revolutionize medicine in more ways than one. The fact that these machines are no longer limited to printing objects of 3mm in size means much more potential lies ahead.

tetra3

What do you think about TETRA’s latest nano structure 3D printer. What types of unique uses do you foresee for this technology now and in the future? Discuss in the TETRA Nano Structure forum thread on 3DPB.com.

tetra10

tetra8

3DPRINT.COM
by  | MARCH 6, 2015

Inspirations by nature

A Futuristic Concept Car Inspired by Nature

http://www.popsci.com/3d-printed-car-inspired-leaf-plant

German engineering firm EDAG took inspiration from the leaf of a plant for its 3D-printed Light Cocoon concept car, which debuts at the Geneva Motor Show, open to the public through March 15.

Rather than printing the entire body shell of the vehicle out of a rigid composite material, as startup Local Motors is doing with its 3D-printed cars, EDAG instead created a lightweight metal structure optimized to use material only where absolutely necessary.

This 3D-printed skeleton is so strong that it doesn’t require traditional sheet metal panels for strength. Instead, a much lighter, high-tech waterproof fabric from German outdoor apparel company Jack Wolfskin envelopes the rigid structure. This triple-layer polyester jersey fabric, called Texapore Softshell O2+, is stretchy and allows light from LEDs underneath to pass through, creating a cool visual effect.

EDAG says the Light Cocoon’s novel construction is much lighter than conventional steel or aluminum body panels, but it did not say by how much.

The company first came up with the spiderweb-like construction method of the Light Cocoon concept car when engineering an aluminum hood for a production vehicle (it didn’t say for which automaker), whereby a network of hollow tubes under the sheet metal provided support and rigidity. This construction method met all necessary stiffness and crash requirements, yet was 25 percent lighter than a conventional car hood, EDAG says.

Though a vehicle based on the Light Cocoon is not likely to see production, EDAG did say that it will continue to refine its 3D printing methods. The company plans to show several car hoods made out of various materials using different additive manufacturing methods at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September.

“With the futuristic concept of our EDAG Light Cocoon, we hope to stimulate the discussion about the future of lightweight construction and automobile production,” said EDAG CEO Jörg Ohlsen, in a statement announcing the concept car.

The Geneva Motor Show opened to the public March 5 following two press preview days. It runs through March 15.

POPSCI.COM
by Matthew de Paula | March 6, 2015

Morality of 3D printing’s future

Superstar Will.i.am Asks a Few Questions About the Morality of 3D Printing’s Future

http://www.dezeen.com/2015/03/06/will-i-am-interview-future-3d-printing-people/

Will.i.am

Will.i.am has called for “new morals, new laws and new codes” for 3D printing, a technology he says is evolving so rapidly that we will soon be able to print humans (+ interview).

Speaking to Dezeen at the launch of his Ekocycle range of sustainable lifestyle products yesterday, the music producer and Black Eyed Peas frontman said that we will be 3D-printing entire people in “our lifetime”.

“Eventually 3D printing will print people,” said Will.i.am. “I’m not saying I agree with it, I’m just saying what’s fact based on plausible growth in technology.”

“Unfortunately that is the reality, but at the same time it pushes humanity to have to adhere to new responsibilities,” he said. “So new morals, new laws and new codes are going to have to be implemented. Humans – as great as we are – are pretty irresponsible. Ask the planet. Ask the environment.”

Will.i.am is chief creative officer of 3D-printing company 3D Systems and has just launched his Ekocycle collection with Coca-Cola at London department store Harrods. Items in the range – which encompasses clothing, bicycles and luggage – are all made from waste materials, including 3D-printer filament produced from recycled plastic bottles.

Will-i-am-Ekocycle-3D-printer_dezeen

Researchers have already used 3D-printing technology to produce prototype organs using living cells. Experts predict that the ability to print complete human tissues is less than 10 years away.

“If you can print a liver or a kidney, god dang it, you’re going to be able to print a whole freaking person,” said Will.i.am. “Now we’re getting into a whole new territory. Moses comes down with the 10 commandments and says ‘Thou shalt not…’. He didn’t say shit about 3D printing.”

“When you have god-like tools, who’s governing me? I don’t know. I could create life. So new codes and morals – beyond laws – something has to be instilled into us. Before, when it was time to reproduce you had to mate. But now…”

He also believes that 3D printing will one day evolve into Star Trek-esque teleportation.

“You’re starting with beef, and leathers, and body parts, eventually it will get more complex,” he said. “It’s basically ‘Beam me up, Scotty’, a 3D printer that disintegrates the source.”

Will.i.am has launched a series of design- and tech-focussed initiatives in the past year, including a smartwatch designed with architect Zaha Hadid and an eyewear range with fashion designer George Garrow.

He is one of a number of well-known musicians that are making the leap into the design and technology industries, including Kanye Westand Pharrell Williams who both recently released clothing and footwear collections with sports brand Adidas.

“Musicians will be taken seriously when their business sells seriously,” said Will.i.am. “When you have serious partners and the products make serious money. Or when your products have serious design features that render it sustainable and they don’t break.”

“You can’t demand that because your famous, everyone’s supposed to like what you’re passionate about,” he continued. “No bro, you have to earn it. Just like the designers earned their respect. Just like you earned your respect as a musician, you have to earn it, it doesn’t just come.”

Will.i.am’s Ekocycle range is now available from a dedicated shop-in-shop on the third floor of Harrods.

Here’s the transcript of our interview with Will.i.am:

Dan Howarth: How is 3D printing going to change?

Will.i.am: I’m going to say something controversial. Eventually 3D-printing will print people. That’s scary. I’m not saying I agree with it, I’m just saying what’s fact based on plausible growth in technology and Moore’s law.

So right now we can print in post-consumer plastics, which is awesome. We can print in aluminium, which is bigger machines and awesome. We can print in titanium, which is pretty freaking crazy and amazing. We can print in steel, which is freaking hardcore. You can print in chocolate, and that’s sweet. You can print in freaking protein, you can make freaking meat. You can print leather. You can print a liver.

So if you can print a liver or a kidney. God dang it, you’re going to be able to print a whole freaking person. And that’s scary. That’s when it’s like, whah! And I’m not saying I agree, but plausible growth would say that with multiple machines that print in different materials, you could print in protein an aluminium combo.

Dan Howarth: How far away from that are we?

Will.i.am: Our lifetime. That’s scary. So unfortunately that is the reality, but at the same time it pushes humanity to have to adhere to new responsibilities, new morals. New lessons are going to have to be implemented. For real. Now we’re getting into a whole new territory. I don’t know what year it was, Moses comes down with the 10 commandments and says “Thou shalt not…” He didn’t say shit about 3D printing.

So new morals, new laws and new codes are going to have to be implemented. Humans – as great as we are – are pretty irresponsible. Ask the planet. Ask the environment.

Dan Howarth: So you think we’re going to need a whole set of laws to regulate what we 3D print?

Will.i.am: Morals, ethics, codes. Laws means someone governs. When you have god-like tools, who’s governing me? I don’t know. I could create life. So new codes and morals – beyond laws. Something has to be instilled into us. We’re going to a place we’ve never been before. We made a Will, we made a car, we made a house, we made a boat, we made flying machines. Before, when it was time to reproduce you had to mate. But now…

You’re starting with beef, and leathers, and body parts. Eventually it will get more complex. It’s basically “Beam me up, Scotty”, a 3D printer that disintegrates the source. Star Trek is pretty cool, because they had things like iPhones, and the internet. They also had 3D printers, that was “beam me up, Scotty”. Teleportation.

Dan Howarth: A number of musicians have transitioned into product and fashion design over the past few years. Do you think they’re taken seriously enough in the design industry?

Will.i.am: Musicians will be taken seriously when their business sells seriously. When you have serious partners and the products make serious money. Or when your products have serious design features that render it sustainable and they don’t break. More importantly, it’s successful in business.

Just like anybody jumping different careers. Say for example Bill Gates was the most amazing guitarist in the world, and he came up there and ripped it, with the facial expressions and everything. It would take you a long time to take Bill Gates seriously as a musician. The more he focuses and believes in it – the test of time will make you see him as a genius if he truly was an amazing guitarist.

Unfortunately those are the laws, and if he truly believes he will understand that. You can’t demand that because your famous, everyone’s supposed to like what you’re passionate about. No bro, you have to earn it. Just like the designers earned their respect. Just like you earned your respect as a musician, you have to earn it, it doesn’t just come.

References:

3D printed shoes – check it!

Would You Wear a 3D Printed Shoe?

http://3dprint.com/47574/3d-printed-shoes-3/

lungfeatured

Only a couple years ago, the thought of 3D printing shoes was one that simply did not make sense. This was especially the case when it came to doing so on desktop fused filament fabrication (FFF) based 3D printers. Recently with the influx of new material options available for 3D printing on these machines, we have seen many new uses for the technology.

We have reported on several instances where companies and individuals have created clothing, accessories such as purses and smartphone cases, and even entirely 3D printed shoes. Now, one Taiwanese company, called Lung x Lung Design, hopes to take this a step further.

The co-founder of Lung x Lung, Min-Chieh Chen, has been obsessed with designing and architecture for a good portion of his life, and has a keen interest in digital fabrication.

lung6

“I’m a designer with an architectural background, having a strong interest in overcoming the limitations of digital fabrication,” Chen tells 3DPrint.com. “Normally I will build one bigger project with one technology, once a year, such as using CNC, laser cutting, high speed cutting machine, and 3D printing. It’s always cool to design and make things by ourselves.”

Chen has owned a FlashForge 3D printer since 2012, and has continuously been experimenting with different ideas. Last year he 3D printed a Hex Chain 3D Dresswhich was a remix of another design he found on Thingiverse. Then later that year, he gained a bit of attention from a walking brace that he had created for an injured duck, using his 3D printer.

This year, he wanted to do something new, something that takes the idea of custom footwear and takes it one step further. In doing so, he came up with a 3D printed shoe that features interchangeable heels. When you come to think of it, the idea is really quite brilliant, especially when it comes to women’s footwear.

“Sometimes ladies need to prepare several shoes for daily activities, such as working, social life, and walking,” Chen tells us. “The nice looking shoes are not always the best ones for walking. So why not design an interchangeable heel system? It’s easy to carry without any problem because it’s flexible and anyone can print their own!”

lung4

With the increasing availability of flexible filaments, shoes can be 3D printed that are comfortable to wear, while also being able to easily be bent and compressed to fit into small spaces such as a woman’s handbag.

It took Chen three iterations before perfecting the shoe design, which is based on a shoe designed by a company called Bata. 3D scanning is used to fit the shoe correctly to the wearer’s foot, ensuring an almost perfect fit. The shoe is printed in four separate pieces including the toe, the heel cup, the sole, and sole’s heel. Because of the fact that these shoes can be unassembled, the wearer has the option of removing the heel portion and replacing it with another size. Perhaps a woman would wish to wear a higher heel for going out in the evening, but revert back to the low heel for walking around during the day. Lung x Lung’s design provides this option.

lung3

It should be interesting to see if Chen continues to iterate upon this design and if he creates any other interesting new shoes in the future. What do you think about this Lung x Lung shoe design? Would you be interested in 3D printing your own at home? Discuss in the Lung x Lung shoe forum thread on 3DPB.com.

lung1

3DPRINT.COM
by  | MARCH 2, 2015

3D printed food which grows itself!

It’s Alive! 3D Printed Food Which Grows Itself

http://www.dezeen.com/…/movie-3d-printed-food-living-organ…/

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

Food designer Chloé Rutzerveld has developed a concept for “healthy and sustainable” 3D-printed snacks that sprout plants and mushrooms for flavour.

Rutzerveld‘s Edible Growth project consists of 3D-printed shapes containing a mixture of seeds, spores and yeast, which will start to grow after only a few days.

“Edible growth is exploring how 3D printing could transform the food industry,” she says in the movie. “It is about 3D printing with living organisms, which will develop into a fully grown edible.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

Each of the basket-like 3D-printed structures, which Rutzerveld presented at Dutch Design Week 2014, contains an edible centre of agar – a gelatinous substance that enables the seeds and spores to sprout.

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

As the plants and mushrooms grow, the flavour also develops, transforming into what Rutzerveld claims is a fresh, nutritious and tasty snack after only a few days.

“As it comes out of the 3D printer you can really see the straight lines of the technology,” she says. “But as it develops, you can see organic shapes. You can see the stages of growth and the development of taste and flavour.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

The aim of the project, which Rutzerveld developed in collaboration with the Eindhoven University of Technology and research organisation TNO, was to investigate ways that 3D printing could be used in the food industry.

“By 3D printing food you can make the production chain very short, the transport will be less, there is less land needed,” says Rutzerveld.”But also you can experiment with new structures. You can surprise the consumer with new food and things that haven’t been done before.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

In particular, Rutzerveld wanted to find a way that 3D printers could be used to create fresh and healthy food at home.

“A lot of people think industrialised production methods are unnatural or unhealthy,” Rutzerveld says. “I want to show that it doesn’t have to be the case. You can really see that it’s natural. It’s actually really healthy and sustainable also at the same time.”

Edible Growth 3D-printed food by Chloé Rutzerveld

However, Rutzerveld’s project is still at the research and development stage and she admits it will be a long time before anyone is able to 3D-print her snacks at home.

“It will take at least another eight to ten years before this can be on the market,” she concedes. “The technologies really need to be developed much further.”

Chloé Rutzerveld

Dezeen and MINI Frontiers is an ongoing collaboration with MINI exploring how design and technology are coming together to shape the future.

Dezeen and MINI Frontiers

DEZEEN.COM
by Ben Hobson |  Thursday, February 26th, 2015 at 1:06 pm

Stellar delivery service and 3D printing

Amazon Will Improve their Already Stellar Delivery Service by Making Use of 3D Printing On the Go

http://www.pocket-lint.com/news/132934-amazon-deliveries-will-get-ridiculously-fast-with-3d-printing-in-vans

Amazon is apparently trying all sorts of new delivery options including its Prime Air drone delivery system. Now it’s become apparent that the delivery expert is also looking into 3D printing built right into its delivery vans.

The idea behind the 3D printing trucks is that a person could order a product and have it delivered almost immediately as it gets 3D printed en route. With metal 3D printers that could mean replacement parts for a car arriving hours after ordering.

Amazon has filed several patents that describe the 3D printing trucks as, “mobile manufacturing hubs” suggesting they could make potentially anything. The patent describes that these would not only speed up the delivery time but would also clear valuable storage space in Amazon’s warehouses.

Amazon is also looking into other methods to speed up delivery including drones with its Prime Air service that’s currently being tested in India. It also announced an “anticipatory delivery” service which would allow e-retailers to send products to certain shipping hubs early if it predicts large sales in a particular area.

Amazon has not yet been awarded the patents for its manufacturing hubs. Here’s hoping it does and 3D printing gets pushed forward into daily use even more.

References:

3D printed eyelash curlers – something for ladies!

Ladies – Are You Frustrated With Your Eyelash Curlers? Look No Further.

http://techcrunch.com/2015/03/01/voir-creations/

This is an exhaustive solution to a (physically) small problem.

Biologist Adele Bakhtiarova had never been able to find an eyelash curler that fit her. She struggled with finding one that could reach out to the very last eyelashes on the edges of her eyes. She tried dozens of eyelash curlers. But they would pinch her skin or crimp the lashes into an ‘L’ shape instead of a proper curl.

So after working at Halcyon Molecular, a Founders Fund-backed startup that was trying to find a way to cheaply and quickly sequence the full human genome, she started working on a solution as a side project.

It was a 15-month endeavor. She learned how to design hardware in CAD, then found 3D-printing facilities in the East Bay to prototype some designs and built a mobile app.

The end result is $25 eyelash curler that she will 3D print to custom fit your eyes. It comes paired with a mobile app that you can use to scan your eye profile and then send data to her company Voir Creations, which will make a 3D model of your face. She’s currently in the process of raising $30,000 on Kickstarter to test if there’s consumer interest.

It may feel small. But more broadly speaking, there’s this question of whether 3D printing can usher in an era of mass customization.

We’ve seen a few beauty-related products already. Grace Choi debuted the Mink last year at TechCrunch Disrupt NY. It’s a printer that will make your own custom shades of make-up. I’ve also written about more serious, custom-printed health care products like YC-backed Standard Cyborg, which incorporates 3D printing into making custom fit prosthetic legs.

SOCIAL.TECHCRUNCH.COM
by  | Mar 1, 2015

First 3D printed jet engine

Meanwhile Down Under, Scientists Build the World’s 1st 3D Printed Jet Engine!

http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2015/s4187229.htm

Australian engineers create world’s first 3D printed jet engine.

MICHAEL BRISSENDEN: Forget trinkets and toys – 3D Printers have now entered into the realm of jet engines.

Yes, Australian engineers have created the world’s first ever 3D printed jet engine.

Their work has attracted the attention of Boeing, Airbus even the chief scientist of the US Air Force and the researchers expect it will lead to cheaper, more fuel-efficient jets.

Some even see it as a potential saviour for the manufacturing industry.

From the Australian Air Show in Avalon, here’s the ABC’s science reporter, Jake Sturmer.

(Sound of F18 jets flying overhead)

JAKE STURMER: The cutting edge of military technology is on display here at the air show.

But it’s Amaero Engineering’s tiny booth that’s gathering a large amount of attention.

AIR SHOW VISITOR: Oh, might want show my son that. He’ll be impressed.

JAKE STURMER: Amaero’s CEO, Dr Robert Hobbs, and researchers at Monash University have created the world’s first 3D printed jet engine.

In reality, the breakthrough opens the door for engineers to make and test parts in days instead of months.

(Question to Robert Hobbs) What does that mean in dollar terms? Is that cheaper engines? Is that more efficient engines?

ROBERT HOBBS: Yeah. Particularly- Well, both actually, but particularly more efficient engines because it allows them to go through the development cycle much more quickly.

JAKE STURMER: It all started two years ago when French aerospace giant Safran challenged the researchers to make a 3D printed version of one of their old jet engines.

They passed with flying colours, shaving weight off the turbines in the process.

They’re now working on top secret prototypes for Boeing, Airbus and defence contractor, Raytheon.

There are potentially massive deals on the table and it’s all made in a lab in the suburbs of Melbourne.

(Sound of 3D printer working)

The small garage-sized facility is home to the world’s largest printer of its kind.

Technically known as additive manufacturing, it uses a high powered laser to fuse powdered nickel, titanium or aluminium into the shape of objects.

Monash University’s Vice-Provost for Research, Professor Ian Smith, says the potential is virtually limitless.

IAN SMITH: It’s opened the door. We’re only scratching the tip of the iceberg. We’ve talked about how it can be useful in the aerospace industry, we see enormous applications in the biomedical industry.

For, for example, if you’re unfortunate enough to have one of those serious car accidents, you can be scanned in the scanner, that information can then be taken to a 3D printer and while you’re in the operating table we can print those precise body parts that you might need.

JAKE STURMER: Spare parts for people and potentially cars too – a chance to stave off a decline in manufacturing.

IAN SMITH: We’ve all heard the demise of the motor industry and that’s bad but I think the real impact has been the demise of the supply chain industry that supports that motor industry.

We would like to think that revolutionary disruptive technologies like this, can take the place of some of the more traditional industries, and we can build new industries or we can regenerate existing industries with these kinds of technologies.

MICHAEL BRISSENDEN: The ABC’s science reporter Jake Sturmer speaking to Monash University’s Professor Ian Smith.

ABC.NET.AU
by Jake Sturmer | Thursday, February 26, 2015 08:26:36