3D printed historical objects

A bit of 3D printing history has come to light! 🙂

Printed in the late 1990’s by Professor Ely Sachs (the person to actually coin the phrase ‘3D printing’) this replica of the 1,500 year-old monument in Istanbul is one of a handful of prints created in the original MIT 3D printing lab. Most of the other prints are now lost.

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/old-3d-print-of-hagia-soph…

The 3D print model of the Hagia Sophia was printed by the original MIT 3D printing lab in the late 1990s. It is now owned by a 3D print enthusiast.

In the 1990s Professor Ely Sachs of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was the first person to coin the phrase “3D printing.” Utilizing a printer, which worked with alumina powder and a binding agent, several prints were created in surprising detail for the mid-1990s. Most of these prints were lost, but one has recently emerged, a 3D print of the Hagia Sophia.

The actual print, which measures just four centimeters across and depicts the nearly 1,500-year-old building in Istanbul, was given to a man named Branden Gunn, who works in 3D printing and runs the blog Engunneer. He was given the object by Jim Serdy, who worked with Sachs at MIT in 1990s.

Printed in original MIT 3D printing lab

“We were actually at a company beach party when I was talking with Jim about 3D printing in general, and he went to get the model for me from his car,” Gunn told 3DPrint.com when talking about the old 3D print of the Hagia Sophia. “I was not expecting it as a gift,” he added.

The 3D print model of the Hagia Sophia was printed by the original MIT 3D printing lab in the late 1990s. The model itself has features in the 50-100 micron size range, printed in Alumina, and fired into a ceramic.

The model features the internal geometry of the structure as well. The printer that made the model can be seen at the MIT Museum. Serdy said very few similar prints were done at MIT, and even fewer remain in existence today.

References:
Advertisements

Share comment...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s